Marc Maron Became A Comedian Because He Thought They Have Life Figured Out

Actor and comedian Marc Maron arrives at the Los Angeles premiere screening of the feature film "Afternoon Delight" at the ArcLight Hollywood on Monday, Aug. 19, 2013 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Dan Steinberg/Invision/AP Images)

“I think when I was a kid, I always thought that the comics seemed to have a handle on things because they had a joke about everything or they had a point of view about everything, or they were able to manage a certain amount of chaos and pain and family situations. They just seemed to be able to handle life.”

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How A Game-Show Champion Became The Embattled Conscience Of American Male Geekdom

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Jeopardy! champion Arthur Chu “leveraged his 15 minutes of game-show fame into, of all things, a national platform for his opinions about nerds: What America gets wrong about nerds; what nerds – especially male nerds – get wrong about themselves; and why it matters. … Chu wants to make nerd culture better – and to stop more of his fellow nerds from getting drawn into the worst of it.”

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Director Joss Whedon Quits Twitter After Criticism

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Many called him sexist and misogynistic and said he had done a “hatchet job” on Black Widow, also known as Natasha Romanoff. Whedon had been a high-profile user of Twitter, calling it “enormous work – very fun”.

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‘The Bieber Of Buddhism’

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“Except imagine if Justin Bieber had been pronounced, from age seven, the most perfectly compassionate and wise being.” His Holiness the Seventeenth Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, visits Princeton.

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The Urban Planner Artist Who Wants To Revitalize Without Gentrifying

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“Artists have long been a useful tool for developers; since the 80s the conventional way of ‘waking up’ destitute urban areas has been to rent out cheap studio space to art students and watch the creativity and the café culture follow, before the loft apartments are sold on to the bonus-rich with authentic artisanal grit priced in. Gates wanted to change that cynical paradigm.”

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Ruth Rendell, Fired From Her Reporting Job For Lying, Became A Famous Mystery Writer

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The author of the Inspector Wexford books, and also of intense psychological thrillers under the name Barbara Vine, died Saturday at age 85 several months after a serious stroke. Crime writer Val McDermid: “The broad church that is current British crime writing owes much to a writer who over a 50-year career consistently demonstrated that the genre can continually reinvent itself, moving in new directions, assuming new concerns and exploring new ways of telling stories.”

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Remembering The Young Oliver Sacks

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“The world was saddened to learn of neurologist and best-selling author Oliver Sacks’s terminal illness through a recent op-ed. With Sacks’s new autobiography out this month, Lawrence Weschler shares early stories and diary entries about Sacks, his close friend, before Sacks achieved worldwide fame.”

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Trumpeter Rolf Smedvig, 62

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“Perhaps best known as one of the founding members of the widely acclaimed Empire Brass Quintet, Smedvig enjoyed a busy career as a soloist with major orchestras, including those in Boston, Chicago and Cincinnati. In 1973, the 19-year-old Smedvig was hired as assistant principal trumpet of the Boston Symphony by music director Seiji Ozawa. Smedvig, then the youngest member of the orchestra, moved up to principal trumpet in 1979.”

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The Woman Who Shaped The Las Vegas Skyline

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“Baron Haussmann was lucky enough to be hanging around Paris at the exact moment Napoleon III thought it could do with a refit. Christopher Wren had the good fortune to be alive at the time of Britain’s worst bakery fire. And Betty Willis happened to be working for a sign manufacturer in Las Vegas when the twin forces of modish Googie architecture and the leisure era came together to cut it a singularly brash neon destiny.”

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A Pioneer Of Making Buildings Sing At Night

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Janet Turner “became a much admired role model for women in the design business at a time when few made it into the boardroom. … She was also a powerful proponent of lighting design as a profession in Britain. Until the late 80s, lighting schemes had generally been the province of architects and lighting manufacturers. The emergence of a new breed of specialist designers and consultancies was something she keenly supported.”

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Film Critic Richard Corliss, 71

18 May 1999, Cannes, France, France --- Critic Richard Corliss at Cannes Film Festival --- Image by © Eric Robert & Stephane Cardinale/Sygma/Corbis

“He could have a fanboy’s enthusiasm for his favorite genres – he was big on Bollywood before Bollywood was cool – but he never checked his brains at the popcorn stand. He was of a generation of critics who disputed cinema the way Lutherans and Papists once faced off over theology. But he was nothing if not a sporting polemicist.”

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The Ten Wealthiest Musicians In The UK

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“Of the 1,000 richest people in the UK and the 250 wealthiest in Ireland, the list puts Irish band U2 at third place with £431m. Pop veteran Sir Elton John and Rolling Stones’ frontman Sir Mick Jagger follow with their fortunes, thought to be worth £270m and £225m respectively.”

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Literary Scholar M.H. Abrams, 102

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With “The Mirror and the Lamp,” Professor Abrams almost single-handedly conferred legitimacy on the study of Romantic poetry, which had been held in low regard by the followers of New Criticism, then in its ascendancy.

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Historian And Author Frederic Morton Dead At 90

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“An Austrian-born Holocaust refugee who became a highly regarded chronicler of his abandoned homeland, capturing in works of history and fiction the Viennese society at the fin de siècle and on the eve of two world wars,” Morton was best known for A Nervous Splendor: Vienna, 1888-1889 and Thunder at Twilight: Vienna, 1913-1914, as well as a history of the world’s most famous banking family The Rothschilds.

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