Study: Did Competition Shorten Lives Of The Great Composers?

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“Their analysis suggests being forced to fight for status and recognition—not to mention commissions, performances, and pupils—took a physical toll on these artists. It provides evidence that the stress of competition—particularly among fellow composers living in the same city—literally took years off their lives.”

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More Forensic Psychiatry About The Crazed Wife-Murdering Composer

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Dr. Ruth McAllister looks at contemporary testimony about Gesualdo and his relationships with others, including his second wife, a rival composer, musicians employed by someone else whom he dressed down to their faces, a former mistress tried for witchcraft, and one of his uncles, St. Carlo Borromeo.

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The Film Scholar Who Tracked Down And Archived Decades Of African American Films

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“Seeking visual representations of black people in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, [Phyllis Klotman] learned of the existence of a body of work — long scattered, little known and unpreserved — by early black filmmakers. She traveled the country, scouring attics and cellars and museum vaults, assembling a collection of films by and about African-Americans. Many had survived only in fragments.”

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The Woman Who’s Changing The Face Of Comedy

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“By the time Jones finishes reading a script, she already has ideas about which actors might be right for the roles—and who can handle the pressure of constantly improvising during the eighty-hour workweek that shooting a television comedy often requires. But she also likes the surprise of the unknown.”

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Critic Andrew Porter Dies At 86

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“Among an unusually wide range of pursuits, Porter is perhaps best known in the United States for a two-decade stint as music critic of The New Yorker that concluded in 1992. He often took readers on expansive routes to his main subjects.”

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The Rise And Fall Of Thomas Kinkade

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“It was Thom’s favorite subject: world domination. The excitement of planning, of dreaming, of bringing vision to life. And it wasn’t because of the money. It was because he believed God had a special purpose for him, and that was to influence people through his paintings. He thought that with his paintings, he would change the world.”

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Talent War Breaks Out In Hollywood As Agents Defect

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There was a flurry of activity inside CAA’s offices, known around town as the “Death Star,” on Wednesday. Agents were stunned by the velocity of the turnover, according to people at CAA who could not speak publicly. They said the large-scale relocation came with no warning to management, and even assistants turned up to work with no bosses to tend to.

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Miriam Bienstock, 92, Co-Founder Of Atlantic Records

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“One of very few women in the record business at the time, Ms. Bienstock earned a reputation not only for toughness – her son, Robert, acknowledged in a eulogy for his mother that many of the businessmen she dealt with called her ‘Dragon Lady’ – but also for efficiency and for the kind of shrewd rule-skirting that the record business of the day required.”

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Mary Clarke, Doyenne Of London Dance Critics, Dead At 91

Mary Clarke in her office at the Dancing Times.

“An article in Dancing Times in December 1943 eventually led to her editing that journal for 45 years, and to serving as the Guardian‘s dance critic for 17 years. There were books, too, and she became one of the most influential writers on dance during the second half of the 20th century.”

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They Dug Up Richard III’s Bones – Why Not Shakespeare’s, Too? Here’s Why Not

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“Inspired by the revelations about Richard III, recently liberated from a car park in Leicester, professor Francis Thackeray of Wits University, in Johannesburg, claims he is ‘very interested by the possibility’ of subjecting Shakespeare to the same treatment.” Andrew Dickson explains why he thinks that wouldn’t be worthwhile. (And no, it’s not the curse.)

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America’s Most Prolific (And Generous) Art Forger

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“It obviously isn’t a crime to give a picture to a museum, and they treated me like royalty. One thing led to another, and I kept doing it for 30 years,” says Mark Landis, one of the most prolific art forgers in US history.

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Tony Award-Winning Director Gene Saks Dead At 93

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While his career in both theater and movies included such hits as Mame, Same Time Next Year and I Love My Wife, Saks was best known for a long series of collaborations (stage and screen) with Neil Simon, from Barefoot in the Park and The Odd Couple through to the “Brighton Beach Trilogy.”

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Court Orders Turkish President To Pay Damages For Insulting Artist’s Work

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Four years ago, when he was still prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan described a peace monument by sculptor Mehmet Aksoy near the Turkish-Armenian border as a “monstrosity.” Under libel laws that Erdoğan has been quick to use himself against critics, he was ordered to pay Aksoy 10,000 lire (about $3,800). The president is appealing.

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The Lawyer Who’s Preparing For Courts About, And Maybe In, Space

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“I began to see analogues between the founding of the United States and what we would need to do to go into space. I want to point out very, very strongly that this analogy between the founding of the US and space law is not a call for United States dominance or Manifest Destiny in space.”

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A Chinese-American Artist’s Pastels Inspired The Look Of Walt Disney’s ‘Bambi’

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“Inspired by Chinese landscape paintings, [Tyrus Wong] used watercolor and pastels to make sample sketches that evoked forest scenes with simple strokes of color and special attention to light and shadow. … Wong’s sketches caught Disney’s eye and became the guide for Bambi’s background artists, who were later trained to mimic his style.”

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Tomas Tranströmer, 83, Winner Of 2011 Nobel Prize For Literature

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“He wrote in exceptionally pure, cold Swedish without frills. His descriptions of nature were as sparse and alive as a Japanese painting. … His sparse output was highly praised from the moment his first collection, 17 Poems, appeared in 1954 and he was acknowledged as Sweden’s greatest living poet long before he won the Nobel Prize. He was translated into more than 60 languages.”

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Booker Prize Mastermind Martyn Goff, 91

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Goff, who died on Wednesday after a long illness, masterminded the Booker for more than three decades. “The current health of English fiction can be explained in two words: Martyn Goff,” wrote John Sutherland, when the former bookseller announced he was stepping down from the prize in 2002.

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Richard III Finally Gets His State Funeral

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“For an English monarchy that has lasted more than 1,000 years, there can have been few more improbable occasions than the ceremony of remembrance here on Thursday for the reburial of one of the most bloodstained medieval sovereigns.”

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S**t Pierre Boulez Said

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“I don’t want my statements to be frozen in time. A date should always be attached to them. Certainly if you take a picture of yourself 30 years ago, that same picture cannot be used as a picture of yourself today.” His incendiary comments, whether directed at his contemporaries (he has described Duchamp as ‘a pompous bore’, Cage as ‘a performing monkey’, and Stockhausen, ‘a hippie’), or more general topics such as culture and history, however, suggest that he enjoys the controversy.

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JK Rowling’s Great Answer To A Question About Dumbledore’s Sexuality

Author JK Rowling

“When Rowling first told fans about Dumbledore’s sexuality, she shed light on the wizard’s confirmed single status by indicating that he was once in love with his childhood friend Gellert Grindelwald – who later went on to become an extremely dangerous dark wizard, and was defeated by Dumbledore prior to the events of the first Harry Potter book.”

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Pierre Boulez Turns 90: His Influence Is Undeniable

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“Boulez’s style is explosive. He detonates a germ of an idea and, like a seed, it grows a sonic forest. The common fallacy is that pieces as highly and intricately structured as these require technical understanding. But you don’t need to be a botanist to be stirred by a field of wild flowers.”

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Norman Scribner, 79, Founder Of D.C.’S Choral Arts Society

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“The late Washington Post music critic Paul Hume once called Mr. Scribner ‘one of Washington’s finest musicians and one of the most gifted choral conductors in the country.’ A skilled pianist, organist and composer, he spent nearly five decades at the helm of the Choral Arts Society.”

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What A Neuroscientist Says About Jon Stewart’s Brain

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Quick-witted would be the layman way to put it; he’ll be interviewing someone… and he’s just very quick, very quick at making these unexpected connections. But the term we would use for that is divergent thinking – that is, making novel connections between things that other people don’t put together, and finding the humor in that.”

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