Music

Enough Is Enough: US Senator Pushes For Law On Allowing Musicians To Bring Instruments On Airplanes

us-airways_1-1

“In a letter sent Friday, the Rhode Island Democrat urged U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx to speed implementation of a 2012 law that requires commercial air carriers to allow musical instruments as carry-on items as long as they can be safely stowed in the aircraft cabin. But Reed said the law has not taken effect because the Department of Transportation has yet to adopt the specific rules needed for the provision.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Time For A New Leader At The Metropolitan Opera?

Peter Gelb directeur du MET Crédit : B. Lacombe/Metropolitan Opera

“What’s clear is that something needs to give and, after nearly thirty-five years of labor-management harmony, it’s apparent that the Met’s problems start at the top. The cleanest solution would be to appoint a new GM, preferably someone, unlike Gelb, with an actual background in opera, who unequivocally believes in the vibrant future of the art form, and who can work creatively within a budget.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

PayPal Forces Buyer To Destroy Violin

regretsy-violin-paypal-post

“Rather than have the violin returned to me, PayPal made the buyer DESTROY the violin in order to get his money back. They somehow deemed the violin as “counterfeit” even though there is no such thing in the violin world.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Subbing In At The Last Minute For A Broadway Musician? No Problem

subbing musicals

“As recently as the late 1980s, playing in a Broadway musical was not considered the most desirable gig for a musician. Most professionals sought better-paying work in jingles and recording sessions. But as that work dried up, due in part to samplers and digital-audio software, the ace musicians gravitated toward theaters near Times Square.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Denver Seriously Considers Tearing Down Its Concert Hall

20140724__Boettcher-Concert-Hall-Denver~p1

“The CSO is set to move out — temporarily — at the end of the 2014-15 concert season to accommodate a planned $17 million upgrade of the facility. It had hoped to return a year later. But, according to e-mails between the CSO and the Arts & Venues department, the plan may be changing.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

British Government Backs Down On Cuts To Music Education

music-123_2938235b-1

“This is undoubtedly good news. That extra £17 million (the government says £18 million, but no-one quite understands their arithmetic), means the total amount spread around the music hubs will rise to £75 million. This will reverse the decline of recent years, which has been steep.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Saving Canada’s Most Iconic Record-Store Sign

sam the record man

“Since selling its final CD in 2007, Torontonians have been waiting to find out what would happen to the flashing neon discs that used to lure them into Sam the Record Man’s flagship store for nearly 40 years. … City officials were able to finally secure the storefront’s fate earlier this month – on top of a mid-rise tower one block away.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

The Next Big Musical Tool – Your Phone

ff_music7_f

“Your phone is now a recording studio, a music school, and a Guitar Center. Thousands of music apps enable you to do everything from autotune your voicemail greeting to compose a symphony.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

The Stradivarius Investment Company

140728_r25263-320

“The way we look at this violin, from an investment point of view, is that this is a store of value,” Allain said. “We are big investors in gold. That’s a store of value, to the extent that someone is saying it’s worth something, just as we think bitcoin is worth something. This Stradivarius—it’s a finite supply. It’s musical gold.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Queen Elizabeth Appoints First Woman Master Of The Queen’s Music (It Only Took 388 Years)

Judith Weir

Judith Weir says there is still a sneaking suspicion that the world of classical music is carved up by a few big institutions and a handful of powerful cultural leaders. That really is an establishment; but Weir does not need the role of the master for access to classical music’s top table. The opportunity of the role, she says, “is to avoid all that – and go and meet the other people”.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

How Classical And Jazz Are Getting Screwed By Streaming

U.S. musician David Byrne attends a conference with public before screening his movie "True Stories" at the Estoril Film Festival

“Between low royalties, opaque payout rates, declining record sales and suspicion that the major labels have cut deals with the streamers that leave musicians out of the equation, anger from the music business’s artier edges is slow[ly] growing. … The shift to digital is also helping to isolate these already marginalized genres: It has a decisive effect on what listeners can find, and on whether or not an artist can earn a living from his work.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Inside America’s Biggest Employer Of Musicians

PRESIDENT'S OWN0011405256705

“The military is one of the largest employers of musicians in the Washington area; indeed, the Army’s Web site claims that the institution is “the oldest and largest employer of musicians in the world.” The combined budget for the nation’s military bands was projected, in 2013, at $388 million (before sequester-related cutbacks).”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

So Opera Is Dying, Says The Met. But Does The Evidence Back That Up?

AR-AG656_SIGHTI_G_20140717151632

“At its best, no art form is more thrilling than grand opera, yet none is at greater risk of following the dinosaurs down the cold road to extinction. The New York City Opera was forced to close its doors last year after seven decades of introducing nonrich New Yorkers to big-house opera. That could happen to the Met, too, unless Mr. Gelb—or his successor—takes a searching look at the company’s artistic policy.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

The Heart Of Opera? Why, That Would Be Germany

718germanopera01

“According to the opera statistics website Operabase, last year 7,230 opera performances took place in Germany, one-third of the world’s total. The United States was a distant second, at 1,730 performances, followed by Russia and France, at 1,441 and 1,288, respectively. Austria ranked sixth, at 1,252 performances, and Switzerland ninth, at 795.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Opera Out In The Wild (And Great Fun It Is Too)

MillCity2-e1405343850849

“Sometime a few years ago some local members of the arts scene decided that it would be fun to start a summer opera company and hold all the productions in an outdoor platz that is part of the ruins of an old milling company, now turned into an educational museum. The next morning, when they had sobered up, it still seemed like a good idea, so they ran with it. The result is one of the most fun and entertaining additions to the Twin Cities art scene in many a year.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter