The Latest Group To Use Drones: Archaeologists

drone 2

“Archaeologists around the world, who have long relied on the classic tools of their profession, like the trowel and the plumb bob, are now turning to the modern technology of drones to defend and explore endangered sites. And perhaps nowhere is the shift happening as swiftly as in Peru.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

What Do We Do With Our Old, Disused Airports?

airport

There are more out-of-use terminals around than you’d think, some of them architectural landmarks (Saarinen’s TWA terminal at JFK) and all of them expensive. Jonathan Glancey looks at what’s been tried, from the triumphant repurposing of Berlin Tempelhof to Saarinen’s building to poor old Montreal Mirabel.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Email Is Still The Best Thing On The Internet

email

Some pundits, and Silicon valley types with cloud software to sell, keep arguing that email is an antiquated, dying technology. But no: “You can’t kill email! It’s the cockroach of the Internet, and I mean that as a compliment. This resilience is a good thing.” Alexis Madrigal explains why.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

The Web’s Original Sin: The Serpent Fesses Up (And Says It’s Not Too Late To Repent)

original sin

“I have come to believe that advertising is the original sin of the web. The fallen state of our Internet is a direct, if unintentional, consequence of choosing advertising as the default model to support online content and services.” Ethan Zuckerman, who wrote the code for the very first pop-up ad, points out some downsides of the ad-based business model and argues that there’s still time to come to Jesus work out a better system.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

China’s Young Rival Kings-Of-All-Media

han guo

“China’s culture-watchers have pitted Han Han and Guo Jingming against each other since they were teenagers. The two men, both now in their early thirties, make for a tempting juxtaposition, a sort of Mailer-Vidal rivalry” – except that Mailer and Vidal didn’t write million-selling Young Adult novels, record pop albums, and direct hit movies.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

New $50M Arts Center Coming To San Diego

la jolla music society

The La Jolla Music Society, the San Diego area’s leading presenter of touring classical music and dance performers, is building a two-audottoprium venue that will host films, lectures and exhibitions as well as concerts. The grand opening is planned for 2017.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

We Have Too Many Bogus Plagiarism Scandals

HBO's "True Detective" Season 1 / Director: Cary Fukunaga

Laura Miller argues that few of us realize “just how commonplace plagiarism charges are, how thin most of the evidence is and how poorly the average person understands the nature of the transgression. … We’re a plagiarism-obsessed society, partly because we know how much damage we can do to someone’s career and life by accusing them of it, but largely because so many of us don’t really grasp what plagiarism is.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

What Does It Take For Content Creators To Get Some Royalties?

SpotifyCoverFeature_0

Publishers, record labels, digital distributors, streaming music services – these days it seems like everyone involved in creative works can earn some money except the creators themselves. (Rosanne Cash earned $114 from 600,000 streaming audio plays.) Here are the stories of two struggles – by John Steinbeck’s descendants and by one particular singer-songwriter grand-nephew and his partner – to claw some income back.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Multidisciplinary Public Art Event Actually Wins TV Ratings (It Was Amazingly Popular In Person, Too)

Lumenocity 3

Lumenocity, a collaboration between the Cincinnati Symphony, Cincinnati Ballet, and video artists Brave Berlin – projecting intricate images onto the façade of Music Hall – was that media market’s top-rated TV broadcast last Saturday. And all 42,500 free tickets available for the three-night run were snapped up in 12 minutes. (includes video)

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

$20 Million Loss As Cancellations Mount At Israeli Festivals

israels-live-events-cee-lo-lana-del-rey-lady-gaga-2014-bb25-biilboard-650

Summer is the high season for large-scale outdoor concerts and festivals — “a city like Jerusalem has festivals practically every week”. And though local performers are inured to the threat of attacks, local police are refusing to grant permits for outdoor gatherings. The result is that hotels, restaurants and bands take a financial hit. “Suddenly, they’re stuck in Europe for two days. If they’ve got a large entourage and crew, putting them up can be quite expensive.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Here’s A Map Of 2000 Years Of Cultural History

cultural-migration-trends

“Mapping the geography of cultural migration does gives you some insight about how the kind of culture we value has shifted over the centuries. It’s also a novel lens through which to view our more general history, as those migration trends likely illuminate bigger historical happenings like wars and the building of cross-country infrastructure. At the end of the video you see Florida blowing up in red. More proof that indeed, the sunshine state is a damn nice place to die.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

The Problem With Ivy League Colleges Isn’t A College Problem At All

ivy league

Joshua Rothman, responding to William Deresiewicz’s broadside against the Ivy League and its students: “I tend to draw the opposite conclusion from Deresiewicz’s data: the fact that you can feel soulless in such an intellectual paradise suggests that the problem is bigger than college. … Deresiewicz makes a mistake in ascribing to his students, as personal failings, the problems of the age in which they live.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Amsterdam Is Out Of Control, Says Rijksmuseum Director; Chill Out, Reply Amsterdammers

amsterdam culture war

Wim Pjibes complains in an open letter that the city is “dirty, filthy, and too full”, with too many badly behaved visitors, hashish coffee shops, and whores in shop windows, not to mention a “medieval way of dealing with rubbish”. Opponents are not only calling Pijbes a killjoy, but suggesting that he’s in league with the forces “artwashing” the red-light districts for the sake of real estate interests.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Jed Perl: Art For Art’s Sake Is Losing As Liberals Need It To Do More

ezra-pound

“In our data- and metrics-obsessed era the imaginative ground without which art cannot exist is losing ground. Instead of art-as-art we have art as a comrade-in-arms to some more supposedly stable or substantial or readily comprehensible aspect of our world. Now art is always hyphenated. We have art-and-society, art-and-money, art-and-education, art-and-tourism, art-and-politics, art-and-fun. Art itself, with its ardor, its emotionalism, and its unabashed assertion of the imagination, has become an outlier, its tendency to celebrate a purposeful purposelessness found to be intimidating, if not downright frightening.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

So There’s A Neurological Explanation For Why Boomers Think Their Culture Was Best

pevere03rv1

“The music that moved us in our youth stays with us for a lifetime. It imprints itself on our brains when our personalities are still forming. It mingles with our memory functions and defines our sense of pleasure. It restores a sense of wholeness to even the most fractured souls. But its effect may also account for something else – the fact that people tend to love throughout their lives the music (and movies and books and television) they loved as kids and teenagers. That’s another way of saying there might be a neurological reason baby boomers can be so boring when they insist their music was so much better than anything that came before or after. They can’t help it.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

The Liberal Arts Desperately Need A Defense – And Are Worth Defending

liberal arts

“If left to our own devices we academics might become more and more out of touch with what the society really needs. That tradition of criticizing elitists, criticizing the kind of snobbery that often goes with elite education, that’s I think a very healthy American tradition for good, democratic reasons.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Everything You Need To Know About Amazon Vs. Hachette

Robin Roberts Hachette

“The first half of 2014 has actually seen a 5.6 percent increase in [Hachette]‘s US sales relative to last year. … Nonetheless, e-book sales have fallen, now making up 29 percent of adult book sales in the US versus 34 percent a year ago.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

The New Fandom – It’s All About The Fans

la-et-mn-comiccon-the-mtvu-fandom-awards-and-h-001

“A lot of fans are basically fans of fandom itself. It’s all about them. They have mastered the ‘Star Wars’ or ‘Star Trek’ universes or whatever, but their objects of veneration are useful mainly as a backdrop to their own devotion. Anyone who would camp out in a tent on the sidewalk for weeks in order to be first in line for a movie is more into camping on the sidewalk than movies.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter