Here’s How Big Los Angeles’ Creative Economy Is

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“The report compiled figures on jobs and pay from 2013 for a dozen creative industries that include not just arts and entertainment but also advertising, publishing and three manufacturing and product sales fields: fashion, furniture and toys. Thus defined, the report said, creative sector payrolls accounted for 406,900 jobs in L.A. and Orange counties in 2013 — 12.5% of the region’s economy as a whole.”

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Are Americans Getting Dumber? Here’s The Evidence

Supporters Of Michigan Open Carry Law Hold March And Rally

“The digital revolution, which has brought boundless access to information and entertainment choices, has somehow only enhanced the lowest common denominators—LOL cat videos and the Kardashians. Instead of educating themselves via the Internet, most people simply use it to validate what they already suspect, wish or believe to be true.”

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UK Arts Funding Is In Crisis Says Museum Director

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Most museum directors are wary about criticising government, which funds them, but David Anderson, the director general of National Museum Wales (funded by the Welsh government) and the outgoing president of the Museums Association, says it is time to speak out.

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Knight Foundation Distributes More Millions To South Florida Arts Orgs

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“The Miami-based Knight Foundation on Sunday announced $25 million in new grants to South Florida cultural organizations that include the Perez Art Museum Miami, University of Miami Frost School of Music and the new Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami, bringing its total investment in South Florida arts to $122 million since 2005.”

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Philadelphia’s Prince Music Theater Saved

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“Coming to a choice parcel on Chestnut Street just west of Broad: neither a chic new condominium nor another drugstore. The Prince Music Theater isn’t going anywhere. The defunct theater in the center of town was sold Thursday to the Philadelphia Film Society – a transaction that not only gives the film group a new home, but also preserves the hall’s role for arts groups that cannot afford pricier venues like the Kimmel Center.”

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Yet Another Ancient Iraqi Site (Probably) Destroyed By ISIS

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“‘We are in despair with the government,’ Ali al-Nashmi, a professor of history at Mustansiriya University in Baghdad, said in a telephone interview. He was nearly in tears after hearing the reports about Hatra, which he said had been rare in Iraq for its classical ruins. ‘We are losing the country.'”

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Travels With My Censor: An American Author’s Book Tour Through China

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“Recently, there have been a number of articles in the foreign press about Chinese censorship, with the tone highly critical of American authors who accept changes to their manuscripts in order to publish in mainland China. The articles tend to take a narrowly Western perspective: they rarely examine how such books are read by Chinese, and editors like Zhang are portrayed crudely, as Communist Party hacks. This was one reason I went on the tour – I figured that the best way to understand censorship is to spend a week with your censor.”

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The Double-Edged Sword Of Nostalgia

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“I try to support what few record and book stores survive, and I still mourn the closing of Driggs Pizza in Williamsburg, where on our first date, my wife and I shared a few of the most exquisite pesto-enhanced grandma slices Brooklyn ever conceived. But I also like living in a city that moves to the beat of what Joseph Schumpeter referred to as “creative destruction,” one that innovates, evolves and experiences cultural ebbs and flows.”

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“Relying On Private Sector Funding Makes Me Uneasy,” Says Top British Stage Director

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Rupert Goold, artistic director of the Almeida Theatre: “The arts have to be very uncomfortable and provocative at times, that is their function, it is their function to really serve you. Inevitably, people who are bringing people to see the work in a corporate climate may be resistant to that kind of work being made.”

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How Much Do Britain’s Top Arts Institutions Get From Corporate Sponsors? And What Do The Sponsors Get For Their Money?

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“Details of specific deals are usually secret, because neither arts organisations nor sponsors want their rivals to know exactly what is changing hands. So we looked at the accounts of 10 top arts organisations – Royal Opera, English National Opera, National Theatre, Royal Shakespeare Company, Southbank Centre, British Museum, Science Museum Group, Victoria and Albert Museum, Natural History Museum and National Gallery – and asked them how much money they get from sponsors overall.”

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Should The NYPD Be Deciding When Busking Counts As Art And When As Begging?

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“Recently, a busking video went viral. In it a police officer, armed with a gun and club, passed judgment on a busker, who protested by reading out the law covering art in public. He got a loitering charge. Boos are bad, hisses worse and an audience unsatisfied enough to pelt is humiliating. But a criminal record? Does society want such severity?”

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It’s Time To Consider Making The Destruction Of Cultural Heritage A War Crime

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“In the face of vandalism on this scale and at this level of wantonness and depravity, something larger is called for. The collective voice of the civilized world must speak out and declare that, henceforth, the destruction of cultural heritage will be deemed a war crime, with appropriate penalties meted out by the International Court of Justice in The Hague.”

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Performing Artists Need Emotional, Not Just Financial, Investment In Their Arts

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“Artists are constantly being asked to be financially resilient. But what about emotional resilience? When artists face rejection from a funder or a programmer, who is there to provide that sense of community and solidarity and empathy? So often the work that artists subsidise with time, money, love and belief is treated as a commodity, or just a product by venues.”

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How A Radical Idea To Transform Public Spaces Failed In San Diego

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“The concept behind the Lab — a cadre of designers embedded in the mayor’s office, with the power to revive public spaces around the city and launch a broad campaign of civic engagement — was unique in North America, and almost unimaginable in conservative San Diego. It seemed to answer the long-held desire of architects, especially, for designers to play a role in the decision-making that shapes cities.”

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FCC Approves Strict Net Neutrality Rules, Declares Broadband A Public Utility

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“Following one of the most intense – and bizarre – lobbying battles in the history of modern Washington politics, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) passed strict new rules that give the body its greatest power over the cable industry since the Internet went mainstream.” Said the FCC chairman, “This is no more a plan to regulate the Internet than the First Amendment is a plan to regulate free speech.”

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Who Should Decide How Students Learn About America’s Past?

Who Should Decide How Students Learn About Americas Past

“This school year, the fury is over the new U.S. History Advanced Placement course – in particular, whether its perspective is overly cynical about the country’s past. The controversy raises significant questions about the role of revisionism in education: How should students learn about oppression and exploitation alongside the great achievements of their country? And who decides which events become part of the national narrative as more information comes to light?”

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Non-Profits Versus For-Profits – The Lines Are Blurring

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“All organizations – not just nonprofits – are now in the business of promoting “social good” in order to gain support… If your organization imagines one of its key differentiators to be its social responsibility, well, then your thinking may be at complete odds with the way the market perceives and evaluates all organizations (i.e. nonprofits and for-profits alike).”

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Results: Arts Rank Low In Survey Of Essential Skills Students Need

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“Despite decades of work citing and arguing the value and benefit of the Arts as a core subject important to the education of our children, despite substantial research on that importance, despite the flourishing of hundreds, if not thousands, of exemplary programs across the country, and despite all our efforts, the public seemingly STILL thinks of the arts (at least as important in education) as a frill, a luxury.”

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