Why Bea Arthur And A Unicorn Showing You The Heimlich Maneuver Isn’t Entirely Legal

bea arthur heimlich

The standard poster demonstrating the Heimlich that you see in every New York City restaurant is clear, mostly grayscale, almost demure – and all too easy to ignore entirely. So several eateries have commissioned designers to create new versions: cocktail-lounge romance, ’50s nautical theme, ballroom dancing manual, and, yes, Bea Arthur and a unicorn. But there’s a problem, and it’s not just killjoy Health Department inspectors. (includes audio podcast and sample posters)

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Curators Trash-Talking At The Smithsonian Summer Showdown

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A bracket-style competition by public vote to choose the Smithsonian Institution’s “most iconic” object has led to a barrage of competitive tweeting and Photoshopping, as a Pullman train car races against the original “Star-Spangled Banner” flag, and a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton battles the National Zoo’s young panda (“Bao Bao may be small, but at least she’s not extinct.”) and the space shuttle Discovery (“What is black and white AND has been to space? Not Bao Bao.”).

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Disgraced Delaware Art Museum Selling Yet More Art

delaware art museum calder

The AAMD sanctioned the museum in June for selling a piece from its collection to raise funds. Now that it’s already in museum-Siberia anyway, the DAM has decided to auction off two more works: Winslow Homer’s Milking Time and Alexander Calder’s The Black Crescent.

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Shigeru Ban, Master Of Paper Tube Architecture

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“In a profession often associated with showmanship and ego, Ban’s work appears humble, and appropriate to a historical moment that celebrates altruism, or its posture.” And yet: “You can live in a house designed by Shigeru Ban only if you are recently homeless or exceedingly wealthy.”

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The Spy Heroes Fighting To Save Syria’s Ancient Treasures

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Hoping to help in catching smugglers and eventually rebuilding whatever possible, Cheikhmous Ali and his fellows are risking their lives, using equipment such as cameras hidden inside ballpoint pens (yes, really) to document the catastrophic damage to historic buildings and artifacts from Syria’s civil war. (in English)

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All Sydney Is Arguing Over This Public Sculpture (And It Isn’t Even Built Yet)

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“There are people in the world – otherwise sensible people – who continue to think that the purpose of public art is to make people happy. … [Yet] the purest pleasure excited by a newly announced work of public art is invariably to be found in the breast of the person who cannot stand it. Take Sydney, which has been yelling at itself all week over … plans to install a 50-metre-high undulating arch of stainless steel fettucine right over the road outside Town Hall.”

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Are We Killing Art Museums With Their Own Popularity?

art everywhere

Peter Schjeldahl: “It is idle to lament democratizing developments that have been inexorable for well over half a century, … [but at]what point does a widely shared yen for aesthetic engagement alter the character of that engagement? We’ve reached that point on many days … where the crowds experience mainly crowdedness.”

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Meet The Woman Who Keeps The Metropolitan Museum’s Old Clocks On Time

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“Visitors wandering among the Met’s paintings, mummies and other treasures probably don’t notice that every European clock on exhibit not only still ticks but also tells the right time. That’s because for 40 years, [Claire] Vincent, who oversees the museum’s European timepieces, has been making sure they are wound like clockwork.” (includes slideshow)

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Abu Dhabi’s Glorious Culture District – A Louvre And Guggenheim! (But Behind The Facade, Dark Problems)

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“The most simplistic accusation against Abu Dhabi is that by building branches of the Louvre or Guggenheim, the city is buying culture. This logic pretends that Cleopatra’s Needle ended up in Paris through the goodness of Egyptian hearts, or that Lord Elgin didn’t just pillage the marbles that bear his name. Those accusations also perpetuate another myth: The UAE has no culture of its own.”

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Artist: Taking Children To Museums Is A Waste Of Time

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“Jake Chapman, half of the revered Chapman brothers duo, called parents “arrogant” for thinking children could understand such complex artists as Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko. He says that standing a child in front of a Pollock is an “insult” to the American who pioneered the abstract expressionism. “It’s like saying… it’s as moronic as a child? Children are not human yet,” the father-of-three declared.”

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Frank Lloyd Wright’s American Office Classic – Now Open For Visits

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“It’s risky to call any office building a masterwork. Even the most insightful architecture can prove too inflexible in the face of changing business models, advancing technologies and the volatile fate of companies themselves. Yet Wright’s design for H.F. Johnson Jr., the third-generation leader of what was then called S.C. Johnson & Son, endures both because of the innate intelligence of its design and the pride the family-owned company takes in it.”

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Univ. Of Maryland Revives Its Proposal To Rescue Corcoran Gallery

corcoran UMD logo

U.Md. president Wallace Loh testified in court that, if the judge should deny permission for the current plan to break up the Corcoran and divide it between the National Gallery of Art and George Washington University, “he would be willing to quickly revive a version of the $46 million Maryland partnership plan that the Corcoran rejected in February.”

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Is There A Way To Save The Corcoran Gallery As Is?

corcoran rosenbaum

“Suggesting that the Corcoran should now entertain the same suitors it previously had reason to reject is probably a nonstarter. Instead of negotiating from weakness, the Corcoran should first focus on how to build on its strengths. Bolstering the board with munificent members is crucial. Notwithstanding his power play, [Wayne] Reynolds is to be thanked for identifying hot prospects.”

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What Rembrandt Found In The Rape Of Lucretia That Other Artists Missed

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Philip Kennicott: “One [hand] resolutely grasps the dagger, the other is held open, in a pose of futile resistance. And they are very sturdy hands for a woman with a face as young as the Lucretia in this image. Rembrandt’s Lucretia kills herself with the hands of a man. Which makes visual the ugly truth of the story: Her suicide is a final act of male violence.”

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Why Can’t You See That Famous Painting? Your Museum Rented It

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“The practice has seen such MFA masterpieces as Monet’s ‘Grainstack,’ Van Gogh’s ‘Postman Joseph Roulin,’ and Degas’s ‘Edmondo and Therese Morbilli’ sent to fee-paying museums in Japan, to the Bellagio hotel and casino in Las Vegas, and to shows in northern Italy organized by Linea d’Ombra, a profit-making company that organizes blockbuster exhibitions.”

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How Sotheby’s And Christie’s Locate New People To Spend Massive Sums Of Money On Art

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“If you’re even remotely curious about starting a blue-chip art collection, there’s a good chance the world’s biggest auction houses already know who you are, and exactly how much you might spend to own a masterpiece. … They’ve dispatched armies of experts to identify potential bigwigs, and satisfy their ever-expanding art whims.”

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