Using New Language Analysis, Scholars Attribute Another Play To Shakespeare

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“We can tentatively add another play to the Shakespeare canon. Using a unique form of text analysis, in which they weigh the “psychological signatures” of three possible authors, psychologists Ryan L. Boyd and James Pennebaker of the University of Texas-Austin conclude Double Falsehood was written largely by the man who brought us Twelfth Night and King Lear.”

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An Interactive Map Of Shakespeare’s London

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“[It] pulls information from databases with names of locations, people, organizations in the city at the time, as well as reference material about the early modern period in London. These data are layered on to the ‘Agas’ base map [from 1561]. So if you click on the Middle Temple building, for example, the map will give you an idea of what it is and how it was used, back when Shakespeare was around.”

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What Harvey Weinstein Learned On “Finding Neverland”‘s Long, Long Trip To Broadway

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“In making the leap from movie mogul to lead theater producer … [he] has fired or lost more actors, artists and executives than most impresarios do on their shows. … Yet Mr. Weinstein has been more than a hands-on producer. At 63, he has also become a student again, learning the art and craft of making musicals, one of the trickiest entertainment forms to get right.”

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A Serbian/Kosovar “Romeo And Juliet”

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The Capulets are Serbs, the Montagues are Kosovo Albanians, and each family will be speaking its own language. There are no subtitles. “There are people in Belgrade who don’t speak Albanian,” says the director, “but they will understand.” (Do most people in Pristina, where the production opens next month, speak Serbian?)

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Canada’s Shaw Festival Gets A New Leader On The Eve Of A Big Project

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Tim Jennings will lead the Shaw Festival. Originally from Georgetown, Ont., he “has had a long career in theatre management, having worked at the Canadian Opera Company and held the position of managing director at Toronto’s Roseneath Theatre and the Seattle Children’s Theatre.” Most recently he has led Minneapolis’s Children’s Theatre Company.

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Writing A Play In Which The Characters Can’t Speak

Writing A Play In Which The Characters Cant Speak

Bess Wohl’s Small Mouth Sounds takes place at a silent Buddhist retreat. “Aside from the unseen teacher, who lectures from offstage, its characters say almost nothing. Most of the play is written in the form of stage directions, and the audience bases many of its assumptions on nonverbal cues.”

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We’re In A New Golden Age Of Comedians

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“There has never been a better time to be a comedian: The talent pool is broad, deep, and more diverse than ever before; a new generation of passionate fans is supporting experimental work; and there are countless ways (online, onscreen, in your earbuds, at live shows) for new voices to be heard and — not always a given when it comes to the internet — make a living. It’s a peak that hasn’t been seen since the first comedy boom, which lasted from 1979 to about 1995, and was defined by two stages.”

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Five Philadelphia Theatre Companies Find A New Home

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“After 18 years performing at the tiny but storied Adrienne Theater on Sansom Street, InterAct Theatre Company will be picking up its props and sets and leading a group of four other theatrical organizations to a new, multistage home being carved out of the old Drake hotel ballroom behind the Kimmel Center.”

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Do We Still Need Theatre Critics?

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“The American Theatre Critics Association, ATCA, the only national organization of American theatre critics, has been struggling with their criteria for membership. Right now they admit people who, as they put it, write professionally, regularly, and with substance about the theatre. But what does professional mean at a time when only a handful of critics derive all their income from their reviews?”

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A Black, Female Hamlet? Absolutely!

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Wilma Theater artistic director Blanka Zizka: “Hamlet is a remarkable play, and one that I have always wanted to direct, but I had to wait for an extraordinary actor, and it was not until I met Zainab that I knew it was time for our production.”

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Wondering If The Show You’re Seeing Uses Union Actors? Here’s How To Find Out

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Actors’ Equity has been aiming to educate the consumer and protect its members with an “Ask If It’s Equity” campaign that today expanded to Washington and eight other cities. (It tested earlier in Chicago.) The website www.askifitsequity.com will allow visitors to check touring shows city by city, and the D.C./Baltimore market will be seeing a digital ad and Twitter effort.

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How “Sleep No More” Went From Avant-Garde Theatre Experiment To Thriving Commercial Enterprise

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When the British company brought its immersive adaptation of Macbeth to New York in 2011 and parked it at an old hotel on the far West Side, the project was still experimental and risky, good reviews or no. Four years later, Sleep No More has a merch table, souvenir programs, and an associated bar and restaurant. It is, writes Alexis Soloski, “a case study of the relationship – sometimes cozy, sometimes uneasy – between art and commerce.”

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How Two Theatre Managers Became Impresarios Across The West End And Broadway

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“With backstage space in the 123-year-old building being severely limited, and no spare cash available to rent an office, Ms Squire instead parked the car outside the theatre, and worked from there. So while having to dodge Westminster City Council’s enthusiastic traffic wardens, she would sit in the driver’s seat and do all the paperwork.”

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Carey Perloff: The Big Challenges For American Theatre

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She’s disturbed by the way “many large-scale institutional theaters today have become roadhouses to incubate commercial productions headed for Broadway,” alarmed at the “relative paucity of female voices rising to the top of our profession” and frustrated that funding sources are so heavily focused on new-play development that there is “virtually no support for the training of actors” and not all that much for new approaches to the classics.

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Cirque du Soleil To Be Sold?

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Renée-Claude Ménard, senior director of public relations for the circus, told CBC News the company is searching for a “strategic partner. This is a very long process and [founder and majority shareholder] Guy Laliberté will take the time necessary to evaluate all available options,” Ménard said.

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What Shakespeare Knew About Robert Durst’s Confession-Or-Non-Confession

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Adam Gopnik: “Many people have pointed out the eerie resemblance of Durst’s words to a Shakespearean soliloquy. Actually, only one kind of soliloquy – the villain’s kind – takes this form. Durst’s words are not at all Hamlet-like, as some have said. They recall, instead, the soliloquies of Iago, in Othello, and of Edmund, in King Lear – the moments when an evil man speaks out loud of his own capacity for evil, and then assures us that there’s nothing really shocking there.”

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At Stanford, Musical Theater About The Birth Of Modern Computing

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“In December 1968, the computer scientist Douglas Engelbart … brought together for the first time a mouse, word processing, multimedia communication and networking to demonstrate interactive computing before an audience of a thousand leading computer scientists. His presentation would become known as the Demo.” Ben Neill and Mikel Rouse have now made the Demo into a stage work .

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