People

What’s Jon Stewart Going To Do With Himself Now?

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“What I’m doing. Whether it’s standup, the show, books or films, I consider all this just different vehicles to continue a conversation about what it means to be a democratic nation, and to have it written into the constitution [sic] that all men are created equal – but to live with that for 100 years with slaves. How do those contradictions play themselves out? And how do we honestly assess our failings and move forward with integrity?”

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Raw Nerve: Françoise Mouly

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The art editor of The New Yorker – the woman who has chosen hundreds of striking, witty, and sometimes powerful covers – talks with Grace Bello about using visual imagery to master English, what comics can tell us about the state of a culture, and collaborating with husband Art Spiegelman on the seminal graphic magazine Raw.

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Meryl Streep Funds Screenwriting Lab For Women Over 40

"India's Daughter" New York Screening

“Called the Writers Lab, the screenplay development program aims to increase opportunities for female screenwriters over the age of 40. This year the initiative will accept submissions May 1-June 1, with eight winning scribes named Aug. 1.”

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Why Did Somebody Steal Einstein’s Brain?

Israeli Prime Minister, David Ben Gourio

“While Einstein’s bones (and most of the rest of his body) were cremated and his ashes scattered at a secret spot on the Delaware River, in accordance with his wishes, his gray matter took a different course. Thomas Harvey, the pathologist who performed Einstein’s autopsy at Princeton Hospital in New Jersey in 1955, took a bone saw to Einstein’s famous cranium, then a chisel, and snipped out the century’s most famous brain. Then he kept it.”

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Two New Books Claim Le Corbusier Was An Active Fascist

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Both books—Xavier de Jarcy’s Le Corbusier, un fascisme francais (Albin Michel, 2015), and Francois Chaslin Un Corbusier (Seuil, 2015)—claim the architect was active in several fascist groups in France beginning in the 1920s, but did a good job of keeping his involvement under wraps.

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Morgan Library Gets A New Director

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The Library “looked West to bring back a longtime New Yorker as its new director, choosing Colin B. Bailey, who has served since 2013 as director of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco but was for many years before that the chief curator at the Frick Collection.”

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Günter Grass’s Final Interview: Humanity May Be ‘Sleepwalking’ Into World War

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“We have on the one side Ukraine, whose situation is not improving; in Israel and Palestine things are getting worse; the disaster the Americans left in Iraq, the atrocities of Islamic state and the problem of Syria. There is war everywhere; we run the risk of committing the same mistakes as before; so without realising it we can get into a world war as if we were sleepwalking.”

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Abraham Lincoln, Man Of The Theatre

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“He deeply loved the theater, his teacher from the rugged prairie to raging, war-torn Washington. … Lincoln’s meteoric rise from the frontier was fueled by his skills as a performer. Drama, jokes, stories, courtroom arguments, outdoor debates – he could go on for hours and exhaust rivals such as Senator Stephen Douglas.”

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Eduardo Galeano, Who Inspired Latin American Leftists Through His Writing, Has Died At 74

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“His best known book, ‘The Open Veins of Latin America,; published in 1971, described the historical legacy of the Spanish colonial era and capitalist plunder that followed it. He spurned conventional narrative in favor of anecdotes highlighting, among others, enslaved indigenous Bolivian miners, devastated Brazilian rain forests and polluted Venezuelan oil fields.”

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Günter Grass Dead At 87

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“With his novels, plays, articles and speeches, Mr. Grass became one of Germany’s foremost intellectuals and gadflies. The themes that consumed his literature – guilt, atonement and hypocrisy – were also central to his political commentary. He could be shrill and polarizing, a self-professed ‘troublemaker’ who cultivated what he described as a ‘tendency to bring out into the open what had too long been swept under the carpet.'”

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The Man Who Formalized Jazz Dance As He Recovered From Paralysis

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“Starting in the late 1940s, he conceived an approach to the genre that is known for its elegance, liquidity and keen musicality. It emphasizes strength, balance, alignment, bodily freedom and above all the imperative of his oft-repeated mantra, ‘Never stop moving.’ It was an imperative born of grueling necessity.”

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Anything To Be Learned From The Lisitsa/Toronto Symphony Debacle?

ts lisitsa globe and mail

“The takeaway from all this is still unclear. In the short term, certainly, it’s a public-relations bonanza for Lisitsa, who gets to be a martyr to her beliefs, unpalatable though they may be to some. In the long term, I wonder if there will be lasting consequences to having her Tweets made more public, as their content begins to sink in; and I wonder if this will affect the willingness of orchestras, a group not known for their public courage, to hire her.”

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The Art Of Being Philip Glass (Not So Easy, As It Turns Out)

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For Glass, the point is always process, the doing of the thing, more so than the result. And keeping that in mind, I’m inclined to let him define success here in his own terms: “If you don’t know what to do, there’s actually a chance of doing something new. As long as you know what you’re doing, nothing much of interest is going to happen.”

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Frederick Douglass, Defender Of The Liberal Arts

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“[His] example offers a helpful corrective to the tendency of contemporary education debates to fixate on economic questions. … Douglass’s own life testified to the ability of the liberal arts – fields such as literature, philosophy, the physical sciences, and social sciences – to inspire internal emancipation as well.”

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Humorist Stan Freberg, 88

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“Mr. Freberg was a hard man to pin down. He made hit comedy records, voiced hundreds of cartoon characters and succeeded Jack Benny in one of radio’s most prestigious time slots. He called himself a “guerrilla satirist,” using humor as a barbed weapon to take on issues ranging from the commercialization of Christmas to the hypocrisy of liberals.”

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Hidden Worlds: The Creative World Runs On Assistants

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“When I was an undergrad at Harvard, the English department produced fancy brochures about the opportunities available to its majors: teacher, editor, Rhodes scholar. Personal assistant was not listed. I hadn’t even heard of such positions until senior year, when older friends, artistically inclined friends, started snagging them. It’s the position I think I’ve heard most about now. Nearly every exclusive field runs on assistants.”

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Julie Wilson, 90, Celebrated Cabaret Singer

julie wilson

“Ms. Wilson began her career as a musical theatre actress, both in New York and London. But, beginning in the 1980s, she began to focus on the smaller stages of the cabaret world, finding acclaim for her interpretations of songwriters such as Stephen Sondheim, Kurt Weill, the Gershwins, Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, Rodgers and Hart and Cole Porter.”

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