Issues

Rich People Want Us To Work For Free: “Internship” Has Gone Too Far

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“I recently got asked by an administrator at the Library of Congress to do unpaid labor for its website. … I was dumbfounded to get hit up by a federal agency with an annual budget of $750 million. Yet clearly my experience was not a random event.” Gioia proposes “five simple rules of etiquette for this ugly new beggar-thy-neighbor economy:”

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Orlando’s New Arts Center: As Opening Nears, Plans For Symphony/Opera Stage Are Still On Hold

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“That theater is supposed to be the crown jewel of the center. For many, the center won’t be complete without [it]. … It converts hydraulically from an opera house to a symphony hall and the seats can turn upside down into a flat floor. … But the center needs another $40 million in private donations before it can continue with [that phase] of the project.”

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Smithsonian Turns To Private Funding To Supplement Its Budget

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“In an era of tighter federal funding the Smithsonian is increasing its private fundraising efforts to pay for its stepped-up ambitions at its sprawling network of museums and galleries, the National Zoological Park and research centers, one of the largest collections of museum and research centers in the world.”

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Britain, Give Back The Marbles Of The Parthenon

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“Were a British national monument to suffer the same fate, I dread to think what the reaction would be. But again and again, I have been struck by the equanimity displayed by Athens. With the courtesy that one nation knows for another, the Greeks have trodden a path of conciliation over anger, placation over rancour, humour over hostility.”

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The Need For Critics In The Internet Age

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“Perhaps it is the civic responsibility of the millennial age, one that so eagerly devours electronically its personal content (and that of “friends”) to assure that arts reporting and arts criticism remain central to broad-based media consumption. That responsibility extends to upholding standards, even if they are defined in new terms, lest the biggest loss be the pursuit of truth and an understanding of what has come before and the continuum on which we ride.”

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Survey: Arts Degree Graduates Have High Degree Of Job Satisfaction

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Disputing the “gloomy myths around the value of an arts degree,” the report finds overall job satisfaction for people who have graduated with an arts degree over the past five years is quite high, at 75 percent. That figure is down only slightly from that of older graduates, 82 percent of whom say they are satisfied with their current job.

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Yes, Amazon Is Effectively A Monopoly, And The Justice Dept. Should Rein It In

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Scott Timberg: “In many cities and neighborhoods, Amazon has destroyed the bookstores (and other locally owned shops), so it’s often the only option. Think of what the rapid spread of cellphones have done to payphone booths: There now is no alternative. In other words, exactly what anti-trust legislation was established for.”

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Amazon Isn’t The Problem With Capitalism, It’s Part Of the Solution (So The Justice Dept. Should Let It Be)

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Reihan Salam: “No, I’m not saying that it’s OK for Standard Oil to come along and gouge its customers because we don’t want to discourage future robber barons. I’m saying that having the government step in and squash Amazon before it actually uses its (supposed) pricing power to screw consumers will likely yield less innovative entrepreneurship. The only people who will win in this scenario are the mostly wealthy people who own shares in lazily managed companies.”

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What, Everybody Can Be Queer Now? LGBT Themes And Images Meet The Ever-Vexed Issue Of “Appropriation”

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“In theatre, television and pop music, being gay has become ever more mainstream, while in the traditionally avant-garde art world, queer art (or art that draws on the codes and cultures of homosexuality) is no longer only made by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) artists. … Who has the right to use this imagery and can anyone claim ownership of queer culture?”

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Has U.S. Copyright Law Gone Overboard?

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“Rod Stewart is being sued over the rights to an image of his own head.” (True story.) Louis Menand gives an in-depth look at the current approaches to the concept of copyright – and asks if we need to update our ideas and laws for the Internet era.

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EU Culture Commissioner Rejected By European Parliament

Education, Culture, Youth and Citizenship European Commissioner-designate Navracsics of Hungary addresses the European Parliament's Committee on Culture and Education in Brussels

“A European Parliament committee voted on Monday to reject the nomination of Hungarian Tibor Navracsics as education and culture commissioner.” The legislators found that he was qualified for the post, but objected to his former role as justice minister in the controversial right-wing government of Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orban.

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A Radical Solution For Amazon: Break Up The Monopoly

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“Amazon is the shining representative of a new golden age of monopoly that also includes Google and Walmart. Unlike U.S. Steel, the new behemoths don’t use their barely challenged power to hike up prices. They are, in fact, self-styled servants of the consumer and have ushered in an era of low prices for everything from flat-screen TVs to paper napkins to smart phones.”

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Report: UK Arts Funding Policy Needs An Overhaul

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“Too often there appear to be disguised agendas that benefit a small minority of established, and most commonly London based, arts organisations and a privileged section of the population as a whole,” it states, adding that, with the next general election, an “incoming administration should review the arts council’s remit and the policies and structures for delivering it”.

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Moshe Safdi: We Need To Rethink How We Build Cities

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“Safdi said that proliferating downtown high-rises — he called them “object buildings” — sitting atop retail spaces around the world are creating cities that are “disjointed and disconnected and not worthy of our civilization.” He said these buildings fail to nurture community spaces like the squares and piazzas of the past, so that the very idea of shared space is becoming extinct.”

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What Happens When National Geographic Uses Your Art Without Telling You (Or Paying For It)?

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“National Geographic used artist Barrett Lyon’s internet image (opte.org) on the cover of its bookazine, 100 Scientific Discoveries that Changed the World, and in the book, The Big Idea, without Lyon’s permission or respecting the Creative Commons license that allows it to be used free of charge for non-commercial purposes.”

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Facing Ever-Tighter Budgets, More Paris Institutions Turn To Crowdfunding

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In August, the National Library asked the public to help with the purchase of a €2.4 million illuminated manuscript; last week, the Musée d’Orsay began a campaign to raise €30,000 towards restoration of a Courbet painting. This week, the Louvre – who’s been doing this for four years now – launched a €1 million appeal to help buy a bejeweled 18th-century table that Proust wrote about in Swann’s Way.

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