My Trajectory Leads Back to Provence

pound1

"I knew at fifteen pretty much what I wanted to do... I resolved that at thirty I would know more about poetry than any man living, that I would know the dynamic content from the shell..." - Ezra Pound, "How I Began" (1913) A thrill ran up my spine when I read those words in college, for I harbored an identical ambition with respect to music. I recognized a kindred spirit, someone who was not only obsessed with an art form, but for whom creating in that art form was not enough: he had to devour and digest the entire history of the art, the … [Read more...]

Consumed with Architecture Envy

I heard Mahler's Ninth live today, for the first time since 1977 in Cleveland. I got a ticket (for an instantly sold-out concert) from the conductor, my employer, based on the fact that I wrote my senior paper at Oberlin on the piece. I analyzed the entire thing, but my paper was on the third-movement scherzo, a contrapuntal miracle. I know every note, and I registered every performance mistake. The performance was 85 minutes of me being consumed with envy. How did Mahler develop that continental sense of architecture? How did he know he could … [Read more...]

The Truth About Youth

From Robin Black's mouth to God's ears. And even more true, if possible, about composers. UPDATE: Allow me to amplify a little. The idea of helping young artists is an attractive one (I've done a lot of it myself via publicity and enjoyed doing so), and I eagerly concede Dave Seidel's point below about the young being at a disadvantage in this economy. It's not that I desperately need or desire the occasional $3000 cash prize. The issue is that prizes given to young composers often confer upon them a visibility that then tends to follow … [Read more...]

Canon to the Left of Me, and Now the Right

I had a great time working on my piece Hudson Spiral (2010) last week with the Sirius Quartet, whose career I'd followed from their beginnings - although three of the four players are new since I left the Voice in 2005. It was a rare experience to walk into rehearsal and find performers completely understanding the piece, no explanation necessary, including my totalist dotted-eighth/triplet-quarter rhythms. The performance at Symphony Space last week went great. Here's the recording. The piece is a canon at the major sixth, one of my spiral … [Read more...]

Minimalism Conference Deadline Extended

There was a clever joke to be made there, but I'm too foggy to come up with it. The minimalism conference being held in Finland in September has extended its deadline for paper proposals to April 15. Just follow this link, scroll down, and there's a very convenient online submission form. I submitted a précis for my upcoming paper "Elodie Lauten as Minimalist Improviser." Wish she were still around to enjoy it. … [Read more...]

What Am I, Chopped Liver?

Liturgy1c

David Garland interviews my son's black metal band Liturgy on Spinning on Air. At the end, all the band members say hello to their moms, over the radio. That's Bernard, second from left. … [Read more...]

The Crisis in Education Today

Only one student in my theory class today recognized the song "Lydia the Tattooed Lady," and I had to sing it to jog his memory. There is no hope. UPDATE, 3.28.15: Sometimes I feel impelled to resolve to no longer attempt to make jokes in this space, but if I ever come to that point, there will truly be no hope indeed. I can provide more context for the above remark for people who might want it. My students often surprise me with what they know. I would be neither disappointed nor dismayed if they were unfamiliar with Oklahoma or The Music … [Read more...]

Feeling Played Out, but Also Played

In the next month I have five performances of my music coming up, three of them in New York City. On this coming Sunday, March 22, James Bagwell will conduct the Dessoff Choirs in three movements of my Transcendental Sonnets, 7 PM at Peter Norton at Symphony Space in New York. On Wednesday, April 8, students of Dawn Upshaw's will premiere my song cycle Your Staccato Ways (on poems of Karen Schoemer) at Bard College's Bito Auditorium, at 8 PM. That's a preview performance for the real premiere the following Sunday, April 12 at the Morgan … [Read more...]

There Are No Coincidences

My subject heading is from Jung. Today we went to our usual Saturday breakfast diner. Our favorite table by the window was being vacated, a young guy still sitting there. Nancy brought to my attention that the book in front of him was Music Downtown. This had never happened to me, and I couldn't resist: "Is that a good book?," I asked, ready to slink away quietly if he replied "Not really." "Yeah, it's really good!" "I wrote it," I replied. "Really?" He looked like I had to be joking. His breakfast partner, who turned out to be his uncle and a … [Read more...]

Thirteen, My Lucky Number

Unnameable ex-123

Below is the paper I delivered Saturday at the University of Pittsburgh's microtonality conference. I altered the title from the original "How the 13th Harmonic Saved my Sorry Ass." I think my approach to microtonality is rather unusual, and the conference offered little counter-evidence. I feel like most composers use microtones to add an extra layer of complexity, or just to create an exotic out-of-tuneness, and sometimes (especially Europeans) deploy the harmonic series as little more than a background structuring device. I'm looking for a … [Read more...]

Villain for a Day

I had my most fun day at school ever yesterday. The reason will be arcane to explain. As chair of the arts division, I am on the executive committee, and currently chairing that as well. Last week we made an administrative decision to restrict the divisional listserv for official announcements by the division chair, after a two-year experiment in having it unmoderated, which latter privilege had never been announced and was little used, as far as I know. Anyway, the first non-chair professor to attempt to use the divisional listserv raised a … [Read more...]

The Tough Discipline of the Vernacular

LidaRose-ex

Students are inscrutable. I've taken over first-year theory again this semester, as a favor to a younger colleague. So far I've brought in, as examples for musical analysis, "Take Me Out to the Ball Game"; Tom Lehrer's "Bright College Days"; two ragtimes by Scott Joplin; two barbershop quartet songs, "I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles" and "Lida Rose" from The Music Man; "Yesterday" by the Beatles (unrecognized by half my class); and the Beach Boys' "God Only Knows." The other day a songwriting guitarist kid came to drop the class. His reason: "I'm … [Read more...]

Propelled into Action

Teatro-Petruzzelli

My life has been sedentary and uneventful of late, but that's about to change. In the month two weeks beginning next week I give nine seven lectures in locations across the nation. First I head for the University of Missouri at Kansas City, where I've already had such happy times, to teach classes on the Concord Sonata, microtonality, and such. I will also give my lecture "Thoreau's Flute and Charles Ives's Concord Sonata" at the Kansas City Central Library, 14 West 10th Street, at 6:30 on the evening of Thursday, Feb. 19. Then I'll teach some … [Read more...]