Meet the Muslim Woman Revolutionizing Superhero Comics

Meet the Muslim Woman Revolutionizing Superhero Comics

G. Willow Wilson “was a white kid with no religious upbringing, but converted to Islam during the height of the War on Terror. She’s lived in Egypt, done foreign correspondence for the New York Times, penned a memoir, written an acclaimed novel” – and created a female Muslim superhero who’s a commercial and popular success.

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Top Posts From AJBlogs 03.20.14

Tax relief for British theatre
AJBlog: For What it’s Worth | Published 2014-03-21

A Curator For Black Artists?
AJBlog: Real Clear Arts | Published 2014-03-21

Falling in love
AJBlog: Sandow | Published 2014-03-20

“Nur,” About Islamic Art, Sheds Light On Broader Curatorial Goals
AJBlog: Real Clear Arts | Published 2014-03-20

It’s over in Hannover for enterprising music director
AJBlog: Slipped Disc | Published 2014-03-20

 

 

New Study: All-Nighters May Cause Permanent Brain Damage

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Concern about brain changes from lack of sleep has mounted in recent months with the publication of several other key studies. In January, sleep researchers at the University of Surrey linked sleep loss with disruptions in gene function that could affect metabolism, inflammation, and longterm disease risk to body and brain.

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Are Opera Education Programs A Waste Of Time?

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Considerable amounts of money, effort, resources and curriculum time are expended on these projects but to what end? Certainly not the development of new audiences and a future stock of those all-important punters who are freely prepared to part with good money to see a show. Thirty years into the “opera in education” mission and I have never encountered anyone who said to me: “I was turned on to opera by a school education programme.”

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Here’s The Biggest-Selling Author Every Year Since 2001

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“To call James Patterson prolific would be an understatement. The ad man-turned-author has put his name to 130 novels, 15 of which have publish dates in 2014 alone. But even when you divide his estimated 300 million booksales by that number, it still results with a healthy 2.3 million copies sold per title.”

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Barack Obama, Patent Troll Slayer?

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“Even now, a perfect storm of patent reform is brewing in all three branches of government. Over time, it could reshape intellectual property law to turn the sue-and-settle troll mentality into a thing of the past.”

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Major New Tax Breaks For UK Theatres

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“The scheme will mean producers are able to claim up to a 25% tax rebate on 80% of a production’s up-front eligible budget costs ahead of its run.  Touring shows will receive a 25% relief, while other productions will be eligible for a 20% tax credit.”

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The Terror Of One-Star Book Reviews

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Go find a book you love. Click the one-star reviews – there will always be some. Cancel your plans for this evening. But one-star Amazon reviews are more than a space for performance art or green-ink rantings. Some authors believe that they amount to “bullying”.

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San Diego Opera to Shut Down

San Diego Opera logo

Said executive director Ian Campbell, “Over the last several years, we have lost a number of prominent contributors, frequently because of death, but especially during the recent economic downturn … The demand for opera in this city isn’t high enough.”

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When America Was Really Crazy for Shakespeare

when Americans were nuts for Shakespeare

“The 25-year period around the Civil War was the most extraordinary. You have John Quincy Adams on Desdemona having sex with Othello, Lincoln reading Macbeth, and another president, Grant, rehearsing the role of Desdemona at a military camp. You couldn’t make this stuff up. This is how central a preoccupation Shakespeare was at the time.”

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