New book episode

Episode seven of my in-progress book on the future of classical music is now online.

After some introductory stuff, it goes in a new direction (well, not so new to those of you who read the first, now discarded version of the book). Everything up to now has been the introduction to the book. Now I’ve embarked on the first main section, which will give chapter and verse, in considerable detail, of how classical music is in trouble. But I start with a look at the distant past — at the days when Bach and Mozart were composing, but classical music (as we know it today) didn’t even remotely exist.

I’ve also put a summary of the introduction online (a summary, in other words, of episodes one through six). It’s especially meant for newcomers, but might also be helpful for anyone who’s followed the book, but has read all the old episodes, or might quickly want to review what I’ve written up to now.

The next episode should be online May 29. It’ll offer some fun and maybe even startling data from history.

And by the way…why not mailto:greg@artsjournal.com subscribe to the book? Subscribers get more information than I’m posting here. This time, for instance, I mentioned something I’d left out of the new episode, but which surely should have been there. And I also linked to the latest post on this blog. There’ll be more extras like that — so click the subscription link, and when the blank e-mail form appears, just put “subscribe” in the subject line and mail it off to me. And to make me even happier, add a note to your e-mail, and tell me something about yourself. I’m always curious about who’s subscribing, and why everyone is interested. That often leads to an e-mail exchange, and often enough to some sharing of ideas (from which I learn a lot). I’m going to dedicate the book to everyone in classical music who’s working for change, everyone in the audience who wants change, and especially to the many, many people who’ve helped me in endless ways (which include telling me when I’m wrong). So subscribe, and write to me—and the book will be dedicated to you, too!

Related
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>