Bellaart Paints Homage to Yves Tanguy

Gerard Bellaart's 'Colle de St Tanguy' (2015) [oil on canvas 122x122 cm]

Oil on canvas by Gerard Bellaart (left). Drawing by Yves Tanguy, Joan Miró, Max Morise, and Man Ray (below). Postscript: June 19 -- The work of Gerard Bellaart is a continuous esoteric sub-form of question-and-answer via images. A facetious confession of being, not in the existential sense of painting and sketching, but rather through asymmetry and parallels. Bellaart has all the features of Bellaart; the pursuit of Bellaart, which is the total rejection of shadow, the gradual removal of knowledge and validation of consciousness, the … [Read more...]

Of Poetry and Fakery, Cultural Theft, and Stolen Identity

Heathcote Williams [photo: JH]

The title of Heathcote Williams's memoir, Of Dylan Thomas and his Deaths, reflects the author's belief that the great Welsh poet died twice, not once. He writes, "It can be said that he was to suffer no less than two deaths at American hands." The first death, contrary to the accepted claim that he died of a drinking bout, refers to his "mistreatment with morphine by an incompetent and flamboyant doctor" in New York, who misdiagnosed his condition and "brought on the coma from which he would never recover." The second death came in the form of … [Read more...]

Recapped: R. Crumb Epic Home Video (Un, Deux, Trois)

From 'CRUMB LINES ON PAPER' [2011]

This video was recorded on April 29, 2011 at the Society of Illustrators in New York City, where the exhibition ran from March 23 to April 30. Curated by Monte Beauchamp, editor of The Life and Times of R. Crumb, the show was a retrospective that presented key pieces culled from the underground art collection of Eric Sack, with contributions from Paul Morris and John Lautemann. The laid-on soundtrack is "Pennies From Heaven," from "Ben Webster: King of the Tenors" (part one); a selection from Satie's "Nocturnes," played by Aldo Ciccolini (part … [Read more...]

New from Cold Turkey Press: ‘Of Dylan and his Deaths’

Cover 'Of Dylan and his Deaths' [Cold Turkey Press, 2015]

A writer as prolific as Heathcote Williams runs the risk of having his poems and prose taken for granted. But this essay — a memoir so rich in personal history, so evocative of his first inspiration, Dylan Thomas, and so indignant about the cultural theft of Thomas's identity by a famous imposter — merits attention as a masterpiece of literary investigation. It stands out for high purpose even among his most provocative and polemical works. Yet it is infused with a private tenderness that defies and surpasses moral abstraction. It has a … [Read more...]

The Extinction Lesson of a Comical, Salutary Creature

Illustration © by Elena Caldera

But the bird was fearless and easily lured aboard By an offer of unlimited ship’s biscuits. By a miracle the bird survived the crew’s curiosity And their wondering if it tasted delicious. After it had lived out its life in England A taxidermist was called when it died. He stuffed it and, to retain its luxuriant plumage, Cunning preservatives were applied. Its first owner in its afterlife was John Tradescant, Who passed it onto Elias Ashmole, Since when this comical but salutary creature Has become a curator of the earth’s … [Read more...]

Algren to Get the Literary Biography He Deserves

Colin Asher [Photo: Andrew A. Nelles]

The Leon Levy Center for Biography has awarded fellowships worth $60,000 each to four writers who are currently working on new biographies. One of them is Colin Asher, whose tentatively titled biography of Nelson Algren, But Never a Lovely So Real, is under contract to W. W. Norton & Company. The other recipients are Blake Gopnik for a biography of Andy Warhol, Gordana-Dana Grozdanić for a biography of the Bosnian writer Zija Dizdarević, and Eric K. Washington for a biography of James H. Williams, the former chief porter of Grand Central … [Read more...]

realitystudio.org Launches Jed Birmingham’s Podcast

Jed Birmingham's Podcast from RealityStudio

I am STAGGERED! Of course I would be, for obvious reasons. Did I say I want this embedded in my headstone? Click to listen. It is utterly, inescapably humbling. The really wonderful thing about JB's devotion to books as artifacts is the way he appreciates them as mysteries and teases out their hidden meanings. This is the first in a possible series about William Burroughs, book collecting, the mimeo revolution, and whatever else strikes JB as relevant to his bibliographic interests. … [Read more...]

Sinclair Beiles: Poet of Many Parts and Places

Sinclair Beiles in 1969 [from 'Bone Hebrew,' Cold Turkey Press]

Dyehard Press has re-issued Who Was Sinclair Beiles? in a revised and expanded edition. I posted an item about the first edition when it was published five years ago. It's hard to believe so much time has passed. As I wrote then, Beiles was best known for his association with the Beats. He collaborated on Minutes to Go with William Burroughs, Brion Gysin, and Gregory Corso, and helped to shepherd Burroughs’ manuscript of Naked Lunch into print at the Paris-based Olympia Press, where he worked as an editor. "Best known" is a questionable term, … [Read more...]

‘Fugitive Literature': Granary Books Has Done the Deed

'My Adventures in Fugitive Literature' by Jan Herman [Granary Books, 2015]

Here's what happened: I was invited to speak about "little magazines and William S. Burroughs" on a panel with Jed Birmingham and Charles Plymell at the 2014 Burroughs Centennial Conference hosted in New York City by the Center for the Humanities. After my talk, Steve Clay came up to me and asked to publish what I'd said. I didn't know Steve, though I'd met him once years earlier, but I knew of his Granary Books. Among Granary's many titles was At a Secret Location on the Lower East Side: Adventures in Writing: 1960-1980. Based on a 1998 … [Read more...]

Some Got Plenty and Some Got Plenty O’ Nuttin’

Illustration: Elena Caldera

Five years after the Wall Street crash of 1929, George Gershwin wrote what he called a “banjo song” for "Porgy and Bess." It turned into "I Got Plenty O' Nuttin'" with lyrics by Edwin DuBose Heyward and Ira Gershwin. The second verse goes like this: De folks wid plenty o' plenty Got a lock on de door 'Fraid somebody's a-goin' to rob 'em While dey’s out a-makin' more What for? Heathcote Williams reminded me of the song when his poem Rich People was posted the other day by the International Times in London. His second verse goes like … [Read more...]

Burroughs Central This Is Not

My Adventures in Fugitive Literature [Granary Book, 2015] front cover

Anyone who thinks this blog is Burroughs Central has no idea. The fact is, I'm just skimming. The real Burroughs Central is RealityStudio, where the true aficionados congregate for deep postings by Jed Birmingham's Reports from the Bibliographic Bunker. For example, he recently made the case that le maître's cut-ups in the mimeo mags of the '60s are far more satisfying than the novels of his so-called cut-up trilogy (The Soft Machine, The Ticket That Exploded, and Nova Express). Jed goes into great detail, brilliantly as usual, but his basic … [Read more...]

By Burroughs Possessed >>>>>> Burroughs 101

Burroughs-Possessed [Gerard Bellaart, 2015]

Being a serious writer hardly means leading the life of a saint. In 1951, in Mexico City, long before the publication of Naked Lunch, which made him famous, William S. Burroughs accidentally shot and killed his common-law wife Joan Vollmer in a drunken stunt. He was trying to prove his marksmanship William Tell-style. Instead of hitting the glass placed on her head, he shot her square between the eyes. Gerard Bellaart's charcoal sketch captures Burroughs possessed by what he called "the Ugly Spirit."* * * * * “I am forced to the appalling … [Read more...]