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Kenneth Clark’s Response to Crisis

During World War II, in London’s bleak days, Kenneth Clark acted, as the review of his biography by James Stourton in today’s New York Times reminds us. Clark recognized that in dark times there is a yearning for serious art, music and literature. Many people now feel that we as a nation are going through […]

Comes the Revolution!

Don’t let that word “revolution” scare you this tense Election Day. I’m not talking about the USA. I’m referring to the wonderful exhibition now on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910-1950. It’s a massive show–more than 280 works by 70 artists, filling several galleries. And it’s more than […]

Artificial Intelligence Invades The Museum and Art Worlds

“It’s a massively ambitious project.” That is Tony Guillan, a multimedia producer for the Tate museum, in the U.K, speaking. Guillan manages the IK PRize, which the Tate Britain has awarded for the last few years to projects that use digital technology in an innovative way to promote the exploration of art at the Tate Britain […]

A Star Turn for Giovanni di Paolo

Ever since I first saw Giovanni di Paolo’s  The Creation and the Expulsion from the Paradise in the Robert Lehman Collection at the Metropolitan Museum*, I’ve been a huge fan of the Sienese painter. That wall of six of his works at the Art Institute of Chicago, which I visited again in August, is also stunning. […]

Picture This! Scenes From Tefaf-New York

I spent most of Friday afternoon and evening at Tefaf-New York, and I found it to be as full of interesting paintings and objects as I expected. Here are pictures of some interesting booths–there were so many. When I remember where I was, I’ve added a few details. Richard L. Feigen’s booth–with a wonderful Courbet […]

Big Stakes For This Art Week

Tempus fugit! I’ve been meaning to write more about The European Fine Art Fair’s arrival in New York later this week, but have not had the time. But you can bet that I will be there, prowling the booths at the Park Avenue Armory on Friday. There will be a lot of wonderful art on […]

Maastricht, AKA Tefaf, Comes to New York

Given all the hubbub last week about layoffs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and, more important to me, the deadlines I faced for other articles, I did not have time to expand on my article in last Tuesday’s New York Times about The European Fine Art Fair’s move into North America. Tefaf–most often discussed […]

Met Layoffs Today: About Three Dozen People Were Let Go

Today, the Metropolitan Museum of Art* shed more staff–in the form of involuntary layoffs. As we’ve known for a while, the Met’s financial position has deteriorated: its operating deficit has been placed at anywhere from $10 million to $40 million, depending on various scenarios. I’ve even heard, from informed sources, that it could be larger. […]

What Makes A Good Collector? And What Is Craft vs. Art? Two Stories

Usually, the most noteworthy collectors–aside from those, like J. Paul Getty, with the wherewithal to buy anything they want–are the ones that go their own way, that collect a field that’s out-of-fashion but full of worthy artworks. Usually, they both self-educate and they seek expert advice. One such person is Walter O. Evans (at right), a […]

U.S. As Boiling Pot: “America After the Fall”

Think about American art in the 1930s. Does anything come to mind? Maybe the Regionalism of Thomas Hart Benton and Grant Wood. But there was so much more to the decade than that. For one thing, art was “subsidized” via the Works Progress Administration in the second half of the decade, probably creating a bigger […]

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