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Unveiling Hammershoi, A Worthy Exhibition

While I was away–I traveled to Jordan from Oct. 31 to Nov. 12, more about which another time–a lot happened in the art world, including the New York fall auction season. But before I go there, I want to share my review of an excellent exhibition at Scandinavia House in NYC. The show is titled Painting […]

Denver’s Long-running And Contemporary Commitment to Native American Art

As I’ve mentioned here before, the Denver Art Museum has a long historical record of paying attention to Native American art and valuing it for aesthetic rather ethnographic reasons. That’s a big plus for me because it gives museum a specialty that cannot be seen at every museum–and differentiation among museums is a big attribute. […]

A Good Show Spoiled

With the weather in New York still fine–and warmish–on Saturday, I ventured up to the New York Botanical Garden for FRIDA: Art, Garden, Life, one of the Garden’s hybrid exhibitions that combines plants and paintings. This one, much like the Garden’s 2012 exhibition titled Monet’s Garden, offers about a dozen works of art, exhibited in […]

A Delectable Selection of Native American Art, With Just One Problem

If you read my last post, about thematic exhibition cooperation among museums, you know I was in Santa Fe recently. But why was I in Santa Fe–that’s another story, one that resulted in a review published in The Wall Street Journal last Thursday. It was about an exhibition at the Wheelwright Museum of the American […]

The Shocking Cooper Hewitt, Part Two

Aside from the maltreatment of its beautiful historic building, which I wrote about here nearly three weeks ago, something else is deeply wrong with the new incarnation of the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum: the display and the contextualization of the objects in the displays simply don’t measure up to minimal standards. To be sure, visually […]

First Thoughts On the New Whitney

After visiting the new Whitney Museum twice, for a total of about five hours, I’ve come to some tentative conclusions–first and foremost, that it’s a successful building for art, which always be the prime goal of an art museum. I went into this blog’s archives to see what I thought when I first saw the […]

International Pop, World Pop, And Don’t Forget German Pop

In today’s Arts & Leisure section of The New York Times,  the Walker Art Center’s new International Pop exhibit gets a good curtain-raiser. Randy Kennedy makes its case “not only that Pop was sprouting in countless homegrown versions around the world but also that the term itself has become too narrow to encompass the revolution […]

A Giant Step Forward At The Met

When I visited The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky at the Metropolitan Museum on Saturday afternoon, I was prepared to be delighted–and I was, in more ways than one. The Nelson-Atkins Museum, which co-curated the show with the Musee du Quai Branly in Paris, had primed me for how beautiful it was going to […]

Exhibitions To See This Spring

As usual for the past few years, I also compiled a list of about 30 exhibitions at museums around the country that are on view now or will be on view this spring and summer for The New York Times‘s Museums special section. That’s not so easy. I look at hundreds of exhibition descriptions and […]

Why Otis Kaye?

Last week, The Wall Street Journal published my review of a little show up at the New Britain Museum of American Art: paintings by Otis Kaye. Kaye (1885-1974) is not very well known–in fact, that’s how I began my review. I commend the New Britain museum for taking the show, which was organized, oddly enough, […]

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