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Diane Arbus, The Met and “The Envelope”

Maybe it was the heat, or the humidity. Maybe it was the artist–Diane Arbus, and the fact that diane arbus: in the beginning is focused on her eaerly works, with more than two-thirds of the works on view never before shown. Whatever the reason, the Met Breuer* was packed when I visited on Sunday afternoon. […]

Is This A Portrait If I Say So? A Gutsy Exhibition

But enough about the Met, for the time being at least. Let’s let a little dust settle there. Can we talk about art for a day? Specifically, I want to commend the Bowdoin College Museum of Art for its current exhibition, This Is a Portrait If I Say So: Identity in American Art, 1912 to Today, […]

Painters’ Paintings: Who Owned What When

You never know what might spark the idea for an exhibition, and at the National Gallery in London it was a 2011 gift left to the U.K. by Lucian Freud. He bequeathed a work called Italian Woman by Corot, which he had purchased 10 years earlier “no doubt drawn to its solid brushwork and intense physical […]

Let’s Change to The Positive At the Met–Something “Divine”

Flash back to 1984, and to this excerpt from an article–no, a brief, really, which in itself says something–in The New York Times: Also of interest this week: ”The Flame and the Lotus: Indian and Southeast Asian Art From the Kronos Collections” (Metropolitan Museum, Fifth Avenue and 82d Street): Reflecting a rise in collector interest […]

A Small Museum Focuses On Men

Small museums in this country, and probably everywhere, tend to be ignored. Most lack the kind of art and exhibition program that brings notice beyond their communities. But the Freeport Museum of Art, in northern Illinois, just did something that caught my eye: it organized an exhibition called The Nature of Masculinity.  Yes, there have […]

Since We’re Voting, There’s This Artistic Conundrum

Lest you think I have no sense of fun from my last post, which chastised the Indianapolis Museum of Art for outsourcing its exhibition planning to the public, I thought I would mention an instance where I think engaging the public is fine. It has been taking place at the Royal Academy since mid-March, in […]

Explaining Delacroix, Continued

The Delacroix exhibition at the National Gallery in London that I mentioned in my last post was also on view here in the U.S., at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, under the title Delacroix’s Influence: The Rise of Modern Art from Cézanne to van Gogh.  Yesterday, I learned from Patrick Noon, who curated the show […]

“We All Paint in Delacroix’s Language”

Paul Cezanne said that. He also said that Delacroix’s palette was “the most beautiful” in France. That headline is the end of a short video made by the National Gallery in London; that sentence is the pitch to it. Delacroix and the Rise of Modern Art is currently on view at the NG, and one aspect […]

Expanding Our Art Horizons

In recent years, some museums have begun a push to build their collections in Latin American art and to show more of it in special exhibitions, too. Much of the emphasis has been on modern and contemporary works and/or Spanish Colonial works. That’s why I was pleased to learn about and exhibition that goes, shall we […]

Unveiling Hammershoi, A Worthy Exhibition

While I was away–I traveled to Jordan from Oct. 31 to Nov. 12, more about which another time–a lot happened in the art world, including the New York fall auction season. But before I go there, I want to share my review of an excellent exhibition at Scandinavia House in NYC. The show is titled Painting […]

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