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Exhibitions To See This Spring

vmfa2-Manet

As usual for the past few years, I also compiled a list of about 30 exhibitions at museums around the country that are on view now or will be on view this spring and summer for The New York Times's Museums special section. That's not so easy. I look at hundreds of exhibition descriptions and images, and I strive to choose a balance to appeal to many tastes. So there's always a mix of Old Masters (though few this year), 19th Century European, American, Asian and modern and contemporary art. Sometime I throw in a manuscript exhibit if there's … [Read more...]

Why Otis Kaye?

OK-EasyCome

Last week, The Wall Street Journal published my review of a little show up at the New Britain Museum of American Art: paintings by Otis Kaye. Kaye (1885-1974) is not very well known--in fact, that's how I began my review. I commend the New Britain museum for taking the show, which was organized, oddly enough, by James M. Bradburne, the departing director of the Palazzo Strozzi in Florence. Bradburne had learned of Kaye when the Palazzo Strozzi presented Art and Illusion, a survey of trompe l'oeil from antiquity to the present, in 2009 (which … [Read more...]

“Provocative Intervention” In Dulwich’s Galleries

Made in China

The other day, the Dulwich Picture Gallery announced a 2015 program with "an intervention in the Gallery’s permanent collection offering a provocative challenge to the public." And what could that be? Rather provocatively, it's an exhibition called Made in China, and it's described this way in the press release, as ...a unique intervention that questions the significance and value of the ‘original’ work of art. ‘Made in China: A Doug Fishbone Project’ (10 February–26 July 2015), will see one of the paintings in Dulwich’s collection removed … [Read more...]

Picturing Mary: It Could Have Gone Another Way

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Is there a woman who was painted more frequently in all of Western art than Mary? If so, I don't know of her. So many great artists painted her, in many situations, poses, costumes and guises. That was the rich territory the National Museum of Women in the Arts chose to explore in its current exhibition, Picturing Mary: Woman, Mother, Idea. And although it's not the show I conjured in my mind when I heard the title--a Leonardo side-by-side with a Raphael, a Michelangelo, a Fra Angelico, a Bellini, a Titian, and so on--it's a mind-stretching … [Read more...]

On The Art Movie Docket: Matisse and…

matisse

"Matisse From Tate Modern and MoMA" is the latest of Exhibition on Screen's movies about art exhibitions to open here in the U.S. It's a one-night only event on Jan. 13 at theaters nationwide. Fathom Events is the distributor, and you can find out where it is nearest you right here. The movie is 90 minutes long, and it's about the cutouts show now at MoMA. You can see the preview on YouTube, which tells the five essential things you should know about Matisse's cutouts. Here's the billing from the email I received for a preview (which I can't … [Read more...]

Portland’s Masterworks: Looking Back And Forward

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On Saturday, the Portland Art Museum in Oregon opened a new "Masterworks" exhibition, of El Greco's Holy Family With Saint Mary Magdalen, which is being lent by the Cleveland Museum of Art. It's the fifth show in this series, and I love the idea of borrowing and focusing attention on one artwork. The El Greco "Masterworks" was preceded by Raphael's La Velata, Thomas Moran's Shoshone Falls, Titian's La Bella and Francis Bacon's recording-breaking triptych, Three Studies of Lucian Freud. I think I've written about all of them here, for one … [Read more...]

Happy Thanksgiving, Courtesy of The Bruce

FSnyders

The Bruce Museum sent a seasonal greeting yesterday that I'd like to share. It's Frans Snyder's Still Life with Fruit, Dead Game, Vegetables, a live Monkey, Squirrel and Cat (c. 1635). It's on view now there, as part of Northern Baroque Splendor: The HOHENBUCHAU COLLECTION from: LIECHTENSTEIN. The Princely Collections, Vienna.  Well, part of it is, anyway, through Apr. 12, 2015. Thereafter, the exhibit will travel to the Cincinnati Art Museum. Here's the BG, drawn from the press release: The Hohenbuchau Collection was gathered by Otto … [Read more...]

Opening Soon In Tacoma: New Wing, New Collection

Albert_Bierstadt,_Departure_of_an_Indian_War_Party

Before everyone gets distracted by the opening of the new Harvard Art Museums later this week, let's learn a little about the expansion set to open a day before, on Nov. 15, at the Tacoma Art Museum. I haven't been to Tacoma in about 20 years, and the museum has moved to new quarters since then. Back in 2003, it moved to a $22-million Antoine Predock-designed building. Now it is opening a new wing and entrance to house a collection of Western art donated a few years back. The gift came from a German supermarket mogul, billionaire Erivan … [Read more...]

Zurbarán In The News!

St.Serapion

Since 2012, when TEFAF celebrated its 25th anniversary, the Maastricht art fair has been awarding grants toward the conservation of objects held by museums that have attended the fair in that year. The other day, TEFAF announced the 2104 grants: the €50,000 annual amount from the TEFAF Museum Restoration Fund will be split between two early paintings by Francisco de Zurbaran. One, St. Serapion (1628) [at right], is owned by the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Ct.; the other, Saint Francis of Assisi in Meditation (c. 1630-1635) [below], is in … [Read more...]

Don’t Miss This Exhibition! (Installation Pictures Included)

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In tomorrow's Wall Street Journal, I review an absolutely wonderful exhibition called Grandes Maestros: Great Masters of Iberoamerican Folk Art at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. It's a massive, mesmerizing show that I visited last week--but which I had seen once before, by accident, in Mexico City. I tell that story, very briefly, in my review, headlined A New Perspective on an Overlooked Art Form: A global journey ends in an exhibition that takes folk art seriously. My review begins--like the exhibit--with the three clay … [Read more...]

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