Showstopping Review of Showstoppers

Let us now praise great moments in criticism. Stephen Holden's New York Times review of "Broadway's Greatest Showstoppers," itself contains this showstopping bit of critique:

You haven't really heard "Bring Him Home," the corny, tear-jerking aria from "Les Misérables," until you've savored the grand operatic treatment given it by the tenor J. Mark McVey, sobbing as the strings sighed behind him; it was the aural equivalent of a thick lobster bisque made with heavy cream.

 Nicely done, sir. It calls to mind Jay McInerney's evocative wine/Beatles comparisons in Food and Wine magazine, and does the whole profession proud. 

Thumbnail image for lobster_bisque.jpg
I can taste that Les Miserables viscosity all the way from here.

May 22, 2008 7:01 PM | | Comments (2)


Thanks Skylar,

I just love it when a critique uses metaphor in such an unexpected way. It's so easy to get caught up in the mechanics of a review, and forget that we're describing a work of art. Literary language is really the least we can do in return, but often it's also what we do the least.

Anyway, my blog thinks you rock, too.


Your blog rocks. Speaking of rock, or at least light rock, and this post -- reminds me of when Mike Jollett at NPR compared the last Coldplay album to chocolate. He said, and I'm paraphrasing: The album's great in the same way chocolate makes for a great dessert, which is to say lots of people will like it, but there's nothing very groundbreaking or special about it. Food metaphors work wonders sometimes.

Keep up the awesome work.

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