Welcoming A New AJ Blogger: Art of the audience

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I'm very pleased to welcome a new blogger to ArtsJournal today. Lynne Conner will be writing the blog We the Audience, a blog about the relationships between artists and audiences. Lynne is a professor in the theatre and dance department at Colby College in Maine, where she directs plays and teaches playwriting, performance history, and art for social justice courses. She's also a terrific … [Read more...]

Morbid Curiosity – Culture Is Dead (Move Along…)

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What a week. First there was the Slate piece that declared classical music dead. Then spiked decided that pop music was over. Why is it that people keep wanting to kill off great swaths of our culture? These are only the latest in a long series of articles declaring the end of orchestras, of Netflix, TV, the demise of book stores, movie theatres, publishing, video games, the English language, … [Read more...]

A New ArtsJournal is coming.

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It's been a while since we redesigned ArtsJournal. AJ is now 14 years old, and this will be the fifth redesign. And a new content platform as well, as the site moves to WordPress. This week we're testing the new design while I chase down bugs (for example, the site is currently loading too slowly). I'll write more about the direction the site is taking once it launches, but for now you can see it … [Read more...]

What if an Arts Organization was a MOOC?

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That's "Massive Open Online Course" and they're everywhere right now. Some of the most prestigious universities are creating courses online and attracting tens of thousands of students. Among them is Curtis, the music school in Philadelphia, which became the first big music conservatory to sign up with Coursera. We live in a time in which we're overwhelmed with information, with choices. People … [Read more...]

A New Look

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If you're a follower of ArtsJournal blogs, you'll notice that this blog doesn't look the same as any of the others. That's because I'm in the midst of redesigning all of AJ, starting with the blogs, and using my own as a beta test. It's not just the look that's different (and that look will continue to evolve over the next few weeks, as I work on it). I'm rebuilding the backend of AJ as well. … [Read more...]

Beware the mushy middle

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The NYT's Charles Isherwood writes about what he calls the "odd-man-out" syndrome: This can roughly be described as the experience of attending an event at which much of the audience appears to be having a rollicking good time, while you sit in stony silence, either bored to stupefaction or itchy with irritation, miserably replaying the confluence of life circumstances that have brought you here. … [Read more...]

We're All For Technology Except When…

Nick Carr has a great post about the course of technology development. Progress doesn't always go the way we think it ought to (even if we're right).Progress may, for a time, intersect with one's own personal ideology, and during that period one will become a gung-ho technological progressivist. But that's just coincidence. In the end, progress doesn't care about ideology. Those who think of … [Read more...]

Need Your Help: Let's Make Arts Journalism Viral – UPDATES II:

UPDATE: The first blogs are beginning to sign up to stream: www.createquity.com, www.artsDC.com, http://gatheringnote www.seattledances, www.salvadorcastillo.wordpress.com. One blogger has already tried to embed the feed in Blogger and got back an error. Anyone familiar with embedding in Blogger? Leave a note in the comments at the end of this post and we'll figure it out.UPDATE II: There's a fix … [Read more...]

ArtsJournal Turns Ten Years Old

This week I gave a talk in San Francisco and I mentioned that Sunday - today - ArtsJournal is ten years old. In web terms, that makes us pretty old. Except, in the room were the editors of at least a couple of other arts sites that are older than AJ. Lori Sparrow of Voice of Dance and Patty Gessner of San Francisco Classical Voice run sites that are at least a couple of years older (also there was … [Read more...]