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A Star Turn for Giovanni di Paolo

Ever since I first saw Giovanni di Paolo’s  The Creation and the Expulsion from the Paradise in the Robert Lehman Collection at the Metropolitan Museum*, I’ve been a huge fan of the Sienese painter. That wall of six of his works at the Art Institute of Chicago, which I visited again in August, is also stunning. […]

What Makes A Good Collector? And What Is Craft vs. Art? Two Stories

Usually, the most noteworthy collectors–aside from those, like J. Paul Getty, with the wherewithal to buy anything they want–are the ones that go their own way, that collect a field that’s out-of-fashion but full of worthy artworks. Usually, they both self-educate and they seek expert advice. One such person is Walter O. Evans (at right), a […]

The Revelation in Four “Women Modernists”

The Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach has, under director Hope Alswang, strived to increase the exposure to art by women. It is, for example, known for its annual “Recognition of Art by Women” exhibitions that showcase the work of living painters and sculptors. The artists chosen for that, in my opinion, have been […]

An Exhibition Not to Be Missed, And One I’m Glad Is Over

In New York, I visited several special exhibitions this past week. Let me mention two here. The first, Founding Figures: Copper Sculpture from Ancient Mesopotamia, ca. 3300–2000 B.C., is at the Morgan Library and Museum until Aug. 21. Don’t miss it, if you live nearby. Lucky for me, I had a tour of it from the […]

I’m Back…With A Masterpiece

Europe beckoned–that is where I have been. Not to the art sales in London, but rather to Berlin and then to Bulgaria for a week. I saw a lot of art–fantastic art in Berlin, of course, and some interesting things in Bulgaria. I’ll share some of that here in the future. But while I was […]

Painters’ Paintings: Who Owned What When

You never know what might spark the idea for an exhibition, and at the National Gallery in London it was a 2011 gift left to the U.K. by Lucian Freud. He bequeathed a work called Italian Woman by Corot, which he had purchased 10 years earlier “no doubt drawn to its solid brushwork and intense physical […]

“We All Paint in Delacroix’s Language”

Paul Cezanne said that. He also said that Delacroix’s palette was “the most beautiful” in France. That headline is the end of a short video made by the National Gallery in London; that sentence is the pitch to it. Delacroix and the Rise of Modern Art is currently on view at the NG, and one aspect […]

The Spirit of Alma Thomas — UPDATED

Talk about a life: Alma Thomas was born in Georgia in the 1890s, one of the most vicious decades of the Jim Crow South. She told a reporter in 1972 that when she was young, blacks like her could not enter museums. Yet that year she became the first African-American woman to be honored with […]

Becoming An Art Convert In Spain–And Why

Earlier this year, I made an art pilgrimage to Valladolid, the home of Spain’s National Museum of Sculpture. So much Spanish Renaissance and Baroque sculpture resides and stays in Spain, sometimes because it can’t leave and sometimes because there is no demand to borrow it, and I had felt remiss in not having seen enough Spanish […]

The Broad Museum Answers Back

Several days ago, I asked here if any other art museums in the U.S. were spending as much money buying art as the Crystal Bridges Museum. I had added up the announced purchases over the past year or so by Crystal Bridges and it came to more than $150 million. I could think of only […]

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