Passing the Blame

Wow: famous Japanese composer I’d never heard of admits his music was ghostwritten. I sometimes wish I could claim that my music was ghostwritten, but I’m afraid I must accept responsibility for every note.

UPDATE: Actually, subsequent reading about this has made me think that the real scandal is that this patent mediocrity was ever considered “the Beethoven of Japan” – showing that compositional celebrity is just as uncorrelated to talent or achievement in Japan as it is here.

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    • says

      Check out Rosemary Brown, who claimed to have had many great composers dictate music to her.
      What would be really revolutionary would be to have music dictated to someone by a composer who has yet to be born: e.g. here is a duo for arentant and kkouris, from Men Jurrkot (2918-30014).

      KG replies: SHe’s just who I had in mind.

    • says

      How hard would that piece of news be to understand? “Composer who had said his pieces had been ghostwritten admits to being their actual author.”

      KG replies: (LOL) It would almost be worth doing. One for the history books, as they say.

  1. kea says

    I would love to be a ghostwriter, especially if the pay was good. All I have to do is write music? And then I can pass off all the marketing and publicity, selling it to orchestras/video game companies, interviews, explaining my “creative process”, etc, to someone else? Sold!

  2. mclaren says

    O the hilarious irony. The howling humor of it all. The heavens themselves resound with the laughter of the gods…

    Japanese composer(Mamoru Samuragochi) hires human to compose music for him. When revealed, he suffers disgrace and ignominy.

    American composer (David Cope) gets a computer program (EMI) to write music for him. When revealed, he enjoys worldwide acclaim and kudos.