More Radical, Less Conservative

Composer and Sequenza 21 loiterer Steve Layton ran across this article pairing the two of us and discussing our gradual divergences from minimalism. It’s the kind of composer-centered thinkpiece that I didn’t think anyone wrote anymore except to praise Ligeti, Boulez, Adès, and that crowd that people praise to look cultured. Seems like old times.

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Comments

  1. says

    Good article. Makes a strong case for both yours and Mr. Layton’s music.
    Your next-to-last (or penultimate, as they used to say in theory seminar) sentence:
    It’s the kind of composer-centered thinkpiece that I didn’t think anyone wrote anymore except to praise Ligeti, Boulez, Adès, and that crowd that people praise to look cultured.
    I’m glad you can read all those minds. I was laboring under the misapprehension that at least some of those pieces were written because the writer liked the music.
    KG replies: I don’t need to read minds. The writers tell me themselves. They tell me how much they like the music of Robert Ashley, Terry Riley, and Pierre Boulez. And then they write about Pierre Boulez – because, well, Riley and Ashley aren’t going to make them look good now, are they?

  2. says

    That’s bizarre.
    Things are very different in the culture capitals than in the provinces.
    KG replies: Yes.
    And noticeably healthier in the provinces. For one example, when Cage died, his obituaries in regional papers were warm, accurate, and respectful. His obituaries in NYC spewed vitriol, misquoted him, and regretted his existence.
    If you want to write for the Times, either NY or London, and you have a choice between writing about Glenn Branca and Osvaldo Golijov, you’ll impress a lot more of “the right kind of people” by choosing Golijov, just on the sound of his name alone. Golijov. Gooo-lijov.
    Even so, the line was kinda meant as a joke.