Are you a Channel or are you a Library?

library

TV used to be an appointment medium. It's Thursday night at 8 and you're in front of the set watching or else you missed your favorite show. Then VCR's, DVD's and DVR's progressively pecked away at the appointment schedule. Many of us now wait till a show has aired and then watch a saved copy at our leisure. On-demand TV and mobile subscriptions from channels like HBO and services like Hulu … [Read more...]

Do you want to be my cable company or my TV provider?

tv

I pay my cable provider to supply me with TV. Since I don't want to watch on my cable provider's schedule I pay for Tivo. Since my cable provider doesn't have all the movies I want to watch, I buy DVDs. I also have a Netflix subscription. Since I travel a lot I use Hulu. My cable provider isn't cheap. My cable provider thinks the value it delivers is access to its pipe. But I don't care about … [Read more...]

Sharing, The New Default

share

Build something in the physical world and the minute it's used it starts to decay - scuffs, dents, chips. Drive a car off the new car lot and it immediately loses ten percent of its value. Use something a lot and eventually it wears out. Art is different. A work of art gets more powerful when more people use it. Music that gives voice to people grows in meaning. A play that doesn't get discussed … [Read more...]

The New Literate?

qr

Literacy has traditionally been described as the ability to read for knowledge, write coherently and think critically about printed material. - Wikipedia Literacy at its most basic is the ability to read and write. Someone is judged "literate" by what they've read or written, and notions of literateness (as opposed to "literacy") have changed over time. Time was when definitions of literate … [Read more...]

The Classical Music Critic Goes Extinct

John Terauds, Music Critic

Seems important to note the passing of music criticism as a legitimate job in Canada. John Terauds, for six years staff classical music critic of the Toronto Star, was reassigned this week to the paper’s business section. He was the last full-time classical music critic at a Canadian newspaper. The job of full-time classical music critic literally ceases to exist in English-speaking Canada (Quebec … [Read more...]

A New Look

via CommonCraft

If you're a follower of ArtsJournal blogs, you'll notice that this blog doesn't look the same as any of the others. That's because I'm in the midst of redesigning all of AJ, starting with the blogs, and using my own as a beta test. It's not just the look that's different (and that look will continue to evolve over the next few weeks, as I work on it). I'm rebuilding the backend of AJ as well. … [Read more...]

Sorry, but I'll take experience over artistry

Meadowlands website

Professional sports has more money than God, and they spend more to attract and entertain fans than anyone else. So how does the NFL sell itself? Not by touting the quality of its games. They sell the contest. They sell the experience.And they have to work to keep making the experience better. How many perfectly functional stadiums were discarded in the 1990s/00's to be replaced by facilities with … [Read more...]

The Lang Lang Experience, Live And In 3D

Is the future of live classical music recitals to turn them into a multimedia experience that is somehow more "familiar" to a generation raised on video screens. Here's a report from Lang Lang's concert in London over the weekend:He is not the first classical pianist to give a solo Albert Hall recital but few of his predecessors brought along in-your-face amplification and multiple screens … [Read more...]

How many True Fans do you have?

How do you make a living as an artist? In the old mass-culture model you needed a distribution and marketing engine that could fire up on your behalf to reach as many people as possible. Sell a million albums and if your take after the record company, agents and managers get their share is a buck or two, you're doing pretty well. In the new economy, how many fans do you need to make a living? If … [Read more...]

Beware the mushy middle

mush

The NYT's Charles Isherwood writes about what he calls the "odd-man-out" syndrome: This can roughly be described as the experience of attending an event at which much of the audience appears to be having a rollicking good time, while you sit in stony silence, either bored to stupefaction or itchy with irritation, miserably replaying the confluence of life circumstances that have brought you here. … [Read more...]