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Friday, March 24




Friday, March 24 - - ArtsJournal Yesterdays: Daily Arts News
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Friday, March 24




Ideas

An Orchestra Of Laptops The Princeton Laptop Orchestra, founded last fall, can, with "15 first-year students on Macs connected to custom omnidirectional speakers" emulate a full-fledged orchestra. "Or an electronica band. Or a jazz combo. It's easy when the conductor keeps time via network clocks precise to 20 milliseconds." Wired 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 9:23 pm

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Ideas stories submitted by readers
Aesthetic Competition Walker Art: Off Center Blog
Culture Clash Travel + Leisure, April 2006
William Safire And Art That's Good for You Washington Post 3/15/06
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Visual Arts

Wills Wins Australia's Biggest Art Prize Marcus Wills wins this year's Archibald Prize. "The Melbourne artist won the $35,000 prize for his portrait 'The Paul Juraszek Monolith (after Marcus Gheeraerts)', inspired by an etching by a Flemish engraver." Sydney Morning Herald 03/24/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 10:17 pm

Tate Britain - Fighting For Identity "Tate Britain drew a record 1.73 million visitors last year with shows such as 'Turner Whistler Monet.' Yet many overlook its permanent display of Turners and Gainsboroughs, and forget that it hosts the Turner Prize contest and other contemporary-art events. As the museum turns six this month, it seeks to shed its dowdy image as a venue reserved for old-master shows." Bloomberg.com 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 8:41 pm

Museum Attendance Up/Down In UK "Since scrapping entrance fees, the national galleries and museums that used to charge have attracted 5 million extra visitors. There were celebrations yesterday at the 67 per cent increase in numbers through the doors of institutions from the Science Museum in Manchester to the National Maritime Museum, London, since they axed their admission fees. But of all the national museums and galleries in England - those regarded as so significant they receive funding direct from Government - seven which had never charged have experienced a fall in visitors during the last four years. Overall attendance has risen by only two per cent since 2001 at the museums and galleries that were always free." The Independent (UK) 03/22/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 7:29 pm

Click here for more Visual Arts stories...

Visual Arts stories submitted by readers
Mermaid statue's new parts may not Float Palm Beach Post 3/22/06
Many donations for Blanton Museum come from outside Austin Austin American-Statesman 3/18/06
Ideas

An Orchestra Of Laptops The Princeton Laptop Orchestra, founded last fall, can, with "15 first-year students on Macs connected to custom omnidirectional speakers" emulate a full-fledged orchestra. "Or an electronica band. Or a jazz combo. It's easy when the conductor keeps time via network clocks precise to 20 milliseconds." Wired 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 9:23 pm

Click here for more Ideas stories...

Ideas stories submitted by readers
Aesthetic Competition Walker Art: Off Center Blog
Culture Clash Travel + Leisure, April 2006
William Safire And Art That's Good for You Washington Post 3/15/06
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

Visual Arts

Wills Wins Australia's Biggest Art Prize Marcus Wills wins this year's Archibald Prize. "The Melbourne artist won the $35,000 prize for his portrait 'The Paul Juraszek Monolith (after Marcus Gheeraerts)', inspired by an etching by a Flemish engraver." Sydney Morning Herald 03/24/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 10:17 pm

Tate Britain - Fighting For Identity "Tate Britain drew a record 1.73 million visitors last year with shows such as 'Turner Whistler Monet.' Yet many overlook its permanent display of Turners and Gainsboroughs, and forget that it hosts the Turner Prize contest and other contemporary-art events. As the museum turns six this month, it seeks to shed its dowdy image as a venue reserved for old-master shows." Bloomberg.com 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 8:41 pm

Museum Attendance Up/Down In UK "Since scrapping entrance fees, the national galleries and museums that used to charge have attracted 5 million extra visitors. There were celebrations yesterday at the 67 per cent increase in numbers through the doors of institutions from the Science Museum in Manchester to the National Maritime Museum, London, since they axed their admission fees. But of all the national museums and galleries in England - those regarded as so significant they receive funding direct from Government - seven which had never charged have experienced a fall in visitors during the last four years. Overall attendance has risen by only two per cent since 2001 at the museums and galleries that were always free." The Independent (UK) 03/22/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 7:29 pm

Click here for more Visual Arts stories...

Visual Arts stories submitted by readers
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

Music

Is St. Luke's Orchestra A Model For The Future? The orchestra is flexible in its numbers and its management. "This flexibility -- borne of necessity -- has become a great asset, enabling us to sustain a financially viable model with no deficit. As the orchestra world grapples with top-heavy, inflexible, deficit-ridden organizations -- many of which no longer respond to the changing needs of their communities -- we believe the distinctive structure we have created could end up being a model for the orchestra of the 21st century." BusinessWeek 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 7:25 pm

The Risky Business of Chamber Orchestras Keeping a chamber orchestra alive, even in a city known for its vibrant cultural scene, is a tough assignment, and this week's announcement that Seattle's Northwest Chamber Orchestra would fold came as a harsh dose of reality, but not a big surprise. "There was a time when the loss of the Northwest Chamber Orchestra would have been grieved much more by the music community. The impact is less now, not only because its audiences were in a downward spiral, but because there are more opportunities to hear chamber orchestra repertory now." Seattle Post-Intelligencer 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 5:30 am

Wilkens Takes Ohio Christopher Wilkens, music director of the Orlando Symphony and formerly of the San Antonio Symphony, has been appointed to lead the Akron Symphony in Ohio as well. "Wilkins' audition concert caused a stir in the audience because of how Wilkins helped the orchestra overcome the famously dry acoustics of E.J. Thomas Hall to achieve a large, resonant sound." Akron Beacon Journal (Ohio) 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 5:14 am

All Concertmasters Are Pretty Much Alike, Anyway Philadelphia Orchestra concertmaster David Kim's appearance was to be the highlight of the year for California's El Camino Youth Symphony, but this week, as Kim prepared to leave for Silicon Valley, one of his assistant principals in Philadelphia was in a car accident, another went into labor, and he was forced to stay behind lest the orchestra go leaderless. Nonetheless, after a few phone calls, Kim was able to rustle up a passable replacement soloist for the El Camino kids - his good friend Robert Chen, concertmaster of the Chicago Symphony. San Jose Mercury News 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 5:00 am

Since We're Not Bankrupt After All... In the wake of the bitter, months-long battle that preceded the Louisville Orchestra's contract settlement with its musicians this week, the orchestra knows it has some public fences to mend. So with its April performances back on (the board had threatened to cancel them,) the orchestra is offering free tickets to several shows, and giving subscribers who exchanged out of the April shows extra passes. Louisville Courier-Journal 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 4:53 am

Honoring The Women In A Men's World The Detroit Symphony has created a new annual prize to recognize female composers. "The Elaine Lebenbom Award will be open to an international field and reward the winner with a $10,000 check and the world premiere performances of the selected work on the orchestra's classical subscription series." Detroit Free Press 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 4:49 am

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Music stories submitted by readers
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Arts Issues

Ontario's Arts Funding Bonanza Ontario arts gets a big boost from the province's new budget proposal. "Not only announced increased tax incentives for film and new media, $10-million for the Ontario Heritage Trust and $15-million for libraries ($8-million of that for digital libraries and another $1-million for servers in the province's far north) -- there was also a much-hoped-for $49-million over three years to help complete Toronto's cultural building projects." The Globe & Mail (Canada) 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 9:08 am

George Lucas On America's Negative Cultural Influence: "As long as there has been a talking Hollywood, Hollywood has had a huge impact on the rest of the world. There has been a conflict going on for thousands of years between the haves and the have-nots, and now we are in a position for the first time to show the have-nots what they do not have." Sydney Morning Herald 03/24/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 10:10 pm

Foreign Sch?NEWS_ID=709">Soldier’s imagery from Iraq dominates All-Army Photo Contest USArmyMWR 3/17/06

More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

Music

Is St. Luke's Orchestra A Model For The Future? The orchestra is flexible in its numbers and its management. "This flexibility -- borne of necessity -- has become a great asset, enabling us to sustain a financially viable model with no deficit. As the orchestra world grapples with top-heavy, inflexible, deficit-ridden organizations -- many of which no longer respond to the changing needs of their communities -- we believe the distinctive structure we have created could end up being a model for the orchestra of the 21st century." BusinessWeek 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 7:25 pm

The Risky Business of Chamber Orchestras Keeping a chamber orchestra alive, even in a city known for its vibrant cultural scene, is a tough assignment, and this week's announcement that Seattle's Northwest Chamber Orchestra would fold came as a harsh dose of reality, but not a big surprise. "There was a time when the loss of the Northwest Chamber Orchestra would have been grieved much more by the music community. The impact is less now, not only because its audiences were in a downward spiral, but because there are more opportunities to hear chamber orchestra repertory now." Seattle Post-Intelligencer 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 5:30 am

Wilkens Takes Ohio Christopher Wilkens, music director of the Orlando Symphony and formerly of the San Antonio Symphony, has been appointed to lead the Akron Symphony in Ohio as well. "Wilkins' audition concert caused a stir in the audience because of how Wilkins helped the orchestra overcome the famously dry acoustics of E.J. Thomas Hall to achieve a large, resonant sound." Akron Beacon Journal (Ohio) 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 5:14 am

All Concertmasters Are Pretty Much Alike, Anyway Philadelphia Orchestra concertmaster David Kim's appearance was to be the highlight of the year for California's El Camino Youth Symphony, but this week, as Kim prepared to leave for Silicon Valley, one of his assistant principals in Philadelphia was in a car accident, another went into labor, and he was forced to stay behind lest the orchestra go leaderless. Nonetheless, after a few phone calls, Kim was able to rustle up a passable replacement soloist for the El Camino kids - his good friend Robert Chen, concertmaster of the Chicago Symphony. San Jose Mercury News 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 5:00 am

Since We're Not Bankrupt After All... In the wake of the bitter, months-long battle that preceded the Louisville Orchestra's contract settlement with its musicians this week, the orchestra knows it has some public fences to mend. So with its April performances back on (the board had threatened to cancel them,) the orchestra is offering free tickets to several shows, and giving subscribers who exchanged out of the April shows extra passes. Louisville Courier-Journal 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 4:53 am

Honoring The Women In A Men's World The Detroit Symphony has created a new annual prize to recognize female composers. "The Elaine Lebenbom Award will be open to an international field and reward the winner with a $10,000 check and the world premiere performances of the selected work on the orchestra's classical subscription series." Detroit Free Press 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 4:49 am

Click here for more Music stories...

Music stories submitted by readers
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

Arts Issues

Ontario's Arts Funding Bonanza Ontario arts gets a big boost from the province's new budget proposal. "Not only announced increased tax incentives for film and new media, $10-million for the Ontario Heritage Trust and $15-million for libraries ($8-million of that for digital libraries and another $1-million for servers in the province's far north) -- there was also a much-hoped-for $49-million over three years to help complete Toronto's cultural building projects." The Globe & Mail (Canada) 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 9:08 am

George Lucas On America's Negative Cultural Influence: "As long as there has been a talking Hollywood, Hollywood has had a huge impact on the rest of the world. There has been a conflict going on for thousands of years between the haves and the have-nots, and now we are in a position for the first time to show the have-nots what they do not have." Sydney Morning Herald 03/24/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 10:10 pm

Foreign School Applications On Rise Again At US Schools Reversing a two-year decline in applications, the "number of foreign students who applied to graduate programs in American universities during the current academic year increased by 11 percent" from last year. The New York Times 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 8:26 pm

Click here for more Arts Issues stories...

Arts Issues stories submitted by readers
Rough ride for a rough stone Scotsman 3/20/06
Arts Center Has a Plan to Help Newark Revive New York Times 3/16/06
One Minute You're Up.... Dallas Morning News 3/12/06
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

People

Sarah Caldwell, 82 She was the founding director of the Opera Company of Boston and the first woman to conduct at the Metropolitan Opera. In its glory years Ms. Caldwell's company was a model of bold, imaginative programming, offering musically insightful productions with distinguished casts." The New York Times 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 4:03 pm

The Dan Brown Behind The Book The Da Vinci Code writer filed a brief with the court hearing plagiarism charges against him. "At first glance, the document bears the giddy signatures of a Dan Brown novel. It's chopped into staccato chapters; the language is awkward ("I quite literally woke up one morning and decided to write a thriller that delved into NSA"); and its hero is a simple man who is being pursued by evil forces he doesn't quite understand. Educated at Amherst and Phillips Exeter Academy, Brown had an unusual literary awakening." Slate 03/22/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 8:46 pm

Pio Leyva, 88, Of Buena Vista Fame "Leyva shot to international fame late in life along with his Buena Vista bandmates after recording an album in 1996 with blues legend Ry Cooder in Cuba. The Grammy-winning 1997 Buena Vista Social Club CD introduced the world to traditional Cuban "son" music." CBC 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 8:32 pm

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People stories submitted by readers
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Theatre

Ouzounian: Rings Is Dull The reviews are in on Lord of the Rings, the musical. Toronto Star critic Richard Ouzounian had an unexpected reaction: "From the morning last March when this city first heard that a stage version of J.R.R. Tolkien's classic trilogy would be having its world premiere here, some people hoped it would be magnificent, others feared it might be foolish. But no one ever thought it would wind up being dull. Yet somehow that's the most fitting word" Toronto Star 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 6:40 am

  • "Rings": It Makes The Movie Look Better "Artistically, the stage version makes the movie seem that much more impressive. Neither a straight drama nor a traditional musical, the new production succeeds only as a dazzling spectacle. Even so, you'll need to bone up on the books just to follow what's going on, let alone enjoy the ride. Or better yet, get the DVDs, which for all their interminable length demonstrate how material as intractable as Tolkien's can be made dramatically addictive." Los Angeles Times 03/24/06
    Posted: 03/24/2006 6:27 am

  • Lord of the Rings" Onstage - Unfinished Business "The blueprint for the adaptation a heroic, if misguided, undertaking billed as a hybrid of drama, music and spectacle is now in place. All it needs is an engaging storytelling approach, an emotional arc, credible performances and a more coherent musical score. In other words, what's missing from this adaptation is the essence of theatre itself as that divine place for sharing stories and forging emotional connections between the audience and the performers." The Globe & Mail (Canada) 03/24/06
    Posted: 03/24/2006 6:23 am

  • Brantley: "Rings" Is Lost In Space This ambitious effort, writes Ben Brantley, is "a murky, labyrinthine wood from which no one emerges with head unmuddled, eyes unblurred or eardrums unrattled. Everyone and eool Applications On Rise Again At US Schools Reversing a two-year decline in applications, the "number of foreign students who applied to graduate programs in American universities during the current academic year increased by 11 percent" from last year. The New York Times 03/23/06
    Posted: 03/23/2006 8:26 pm

Click here for more Arts Issues stories...

Arts Issues stories submitted by readers
Rough ride for a rough stone Scotsman 3/20/06
Arts Center Has a Plan to Help Newark Revive New York Times 3/16/06
One Minute You're Up.... Dallas Morning News 3/12/06
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

People

Sarah Caldwell, 82 She was the founding director of the Opera Company of Boston and the first woman to conduct at the Metropolitan Opera. In its glory years Ms. Caldwell's company was a model of bold, imaginative programming, offering musically insightful productions with distinguished casts." The New York Times 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 4:03 pm

The Dan Brown Behind The Book The Da Vinci Code writer filed a brief with the court hearing plagiarism charges against him. "At first glance, the document bears the giddy signatures of a Dan Brown novel. It's chopped into staccato chapters; the language is awkward ("I quite literally woke up one morning and decided to write a thriller that delved into NSA"); and its hero is a simple man who is being pursued by evil forces he doesn't quite understand. Educated at Amherst and Phillips Exeter Academy, Brown had an unusual literary awakening." Slate 03/22/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 8:46 pm

Pio Leyva, 88, Of Buena Vista Fame "Leyva shot to international fame late in life along with his Buena Vista bandmates after recording an album in 1996 with blues legend Ry Cooder in Cuba. The Grammy-winning 1997 Buena Vista Social Club CD introduced the world to traditional Cuban "son" music." CBC 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 8:32 pm

Click here for more People stories...

People stories submitted by readers
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

Theatre

Ouzounian: Rings Is Dull The reviews are in on Lord of the Rings, the musical. Toronto Star critic Richard Ouzounian had an unexpected reaction: "From the morning last March when this city first heard that a stage version of J.R.R. Tolkien's classic trilogy would be having its world premiere here, some people hoped it would be magnificent, others feared it might be foolish. But no one ever thought it would wind up being dull. Yet somehow that's the most fitting word" Toronto Star 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 6:40 am

  • "Rings": It Makes The Movie Look Better "Artistically, the stage version makes the movie seem that much more impressive. Neither a straight drama nor a traditional musical, the new production succeeds only as a dazzling spectacle. Even so, you'll need to bone up on the books just to follow what's going on, let alone enjoy the ride. Or better yet, get the DVDs, which for all their interminable length demonstrate how material as intractable as Tolkien's can be made dramatically addictive." Los Angeles Times 03/24/06
    Posted: 03/24/2006 6:27 am

  • Lord of the Rings" Onstage - Unfinished Business "The blueprint for the adaptation a heroic, if misguided, undertaking billed as a hybrid of drama, music and spectacle is now in place. All it needs is an engaging storytelling approach, an emotional arc, credible performances and a more coherent musical score. In other words, what's missing from this adaptation is the essence of theatre itself as that divine place for sharing stories and forging emotional connections between the audience and the performers." The Globe & Mail (Canada) 03/24/06
    Posted: 03/24/2006 6:23 am

  • Brantley: "Rings" Is Lost In Space This ambitious effort, writes Ben Brantley, is "a murky, labyrinthine wood from which no one emerges with head unmuddled, eyes unblurred or eardrums unrattled. Everyone and everything winds up lost in this $25 million adaptation of J. R. R. Tolkien's cult-inspiring trilogy of fantasy novels. That includes plot, character and the patience of most ordinary theatergoers." The New York Times 03/24/06
    Posted: 03/24/2006 6:20 am

  • "Rings" - It Takes More Than Money To Make Theatre "Behold a paradox. "Lord" is now viable on stage because of the popularity of the movies. Yet even at this stunning budgetary level, theater can't compete with film unless it finds its own, distinctive language. That hasn't sufficiently happened here. And as a result, the iconography of the show isn't fresh enough. Yet, at least." Chicago Tribune 03/24/06
    Posted: 03/24/2006 6:16 am

  • An Early Critical Consensus On "Rings"? The mega-production of Lord of the Rings opened in Toronto Thurday night. "The general feeling is that the spectacle overwhelms the story, and that the hybrid musical/non-musical doesn't really work. It's not that three-and-a-half hours is too long - some of us are used to sitting through Wagner. It's that it isn't enough time to tell the story. Even Peter Jackson needed nine hours of movie time." The Guardian (UK) 03/24/06
    Posted: 03/23/2006 9:52 pm

Live And Synthetic An actress in London's West End is delivering her lines with synthetic vocal cords. "Who's Afraid of Virginia's Sister by Sarah Daniels stars disabled actress Amy Golden in the lead role using a communication aid with a synthesised voice to deliver her lines." BBC 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 8:12 pm

Click here for more Theatre stories...

Theatre stories submitted by readers
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

Publishing

The Problem With Books? Storage "Books, it turns out, inflame a particular kind of passion. They inform, they amuse, they provoke. They keep us company and lull us to sleep. They give manifest evidence of our intellect. They show off our interests and our values. And when we've run out of places to put them, they prove extremely difficult to part with." Washington Post 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 9:06 am

Booker: We 'Da Man The Booker Prize has renewed its affiliation with financial company Man Group. "The five-year agreement means the UK's most prestigious literary award will continue to be branded as The Man Booker Prize." BBC 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 8:01 pm

Click here for more Publishing stories...

Publishing stories submitted by readers
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

Media

A Plan To Jam Cellphones In Theatres "This past week the National Association of Theater Owners (NATO) pondered blocking cellphone signals as a way to improve the cinema experience. The idea was a hot topic in the nation's gambling capital this past week when theater owners from coast to coast met to preview the summer lineups from movie studios and trade tips on combating falling movie theater attendance. The 6,000-strong membership of NATO voted to authorize its board to look into changing federal laws that currently prevent them from using cellphone-jamming equipment in theaters." Christian Science Monitor 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 8:39 am

Sitcoms - Thanks, But I'll Watch The Classics People are watching more sitcoms on TV these days. But they're not watching the new shows. Indeed, new sitcoms have bombed this season, while viewers stick with the classics of the past 30 years. "The viewers say we're not going to tolerate mediocrity any more because we've got the classics and there's a lot of competition out there." The Globe & Mail (Canada) 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 7:06 am

You're A Movie Critic? I Hate You! Movie reviewing is a tough beat, writesverything winds up lost in this $25 million adaptation of J. R. R. Tolkien's cult-inspiring trilogy of fantasy novels. That includes plot, character and the patience of most ordinary theatergoers." The New York Times 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 6:20 am

  • "Rings" - It Takes More Than Money To Make Theatre "Behold a paradox. "Lord" is now viable on stage because of the popularity of the movies. Yet even at this stunning budgetary level, theater can't compete with film unless it finds its own, distinctive language. That hasn't sufficiently happened here. And as a result, the iconography of the show isn't fresh enough. Yet, at least." Chicago Tribune 03/24/06
    Posted: 03/24/2006 6:16 am

  • An Early Critical Consensus On "Rings"? The mega-production of Lord of the Rings opened in Toronto Thurday night. "The general feeling is that the spectacle overwhelms the story, and that the hybrid musical/non-musical doesn't really work. It's not that three-and-a-half hours is too long - some of us are used to sitting through Wagner. It's that it isn't enough time to tell the story. Even Peter Jackson needed nine hours of movie time." The Guardian (UK) 03/24/06
    Posted: 03/23/2006 9:52 pm

Live And Synthetic An actress in London's West End is delivering her lines with synthetic vocal cords. "Who's Afraid of Virginia's Sister by Sarah Daniels stars disabled actress Amy Golden in the lead role using a communication aid with a synthesised voice to deliver her lines." BBC 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 8:12 pm

Click here for more Theatre stories...

Theatre stories submitted by readers
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

Publishing

The Problem With Books? Storage "Books, it turns out, inflame a particular kind of passion. They inform, they amuse, they provoke. They keep us company and lull us to sleep. They give manifest evidence of our intellect. They show off our interests and our values. And when we've run out of places to put them, they prove extremely difficult to part with." Washington Post 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 9:06 am

Booker: We 'Da Man The Booker Prize has renewed its affiliation with financial company Man Group. "The five-year agreement means the UK's most prestigious literary award will continue to be branded as The Man Booker Prize." BBC 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 8:01 pm

Click here for more Publishing stories...

Publishing stories submitted by readers
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

Media

A Plan To Jam Cellphones In Theatres "This past week the National Association of Theater Owners (NATO) pondered blocking cellphone signals as a way to improve the cinema experience. The idea was a hot topic in the nation's gambling capital this past week when theater owners from coast to coast met to preview the summer lineups from movie studios and trade tips on combating falling movie theater attendance. The 6,000-strong membership of NATO voted to authorize its board to look into changing federal laws that currently prevent them from using cellphone-jamming equipment in theaters." Christian Science Monitor 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 8:39 am

Sitcoms - Thanks, But I'll Watch The Classics People are watching more sitcoms on TV these days. But they're not watching the new shows. Indeed, new sitcoms have bombed this season, while viewers stick with the classics of the past 30 years. "The viewers say we're not going to tolerate mediocrity any more because we've got the classics and there's a lot of competition out there." The Globe & Mail (Canada) 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 7:06 am

You're A Movie Critic? I Hate You! Movie reviewing is a tough beat, writes Geoff Pevere. "You can fill newspapers with page upon page of global atrocities, injustices and outrages and expect very little by way of indignant outrage expressed by your readers. But suggest they might have been wrong about loving Star Wars? For this you bring down the wrath of the heavens." Toronto Star 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 6:53 am

UK Movies - Buy, Rip, Burn UK movie fans will soon be able to buy and download movies online. "Fans will pay 19.99 for a DVD of their chosen film plus two digital copies to keep indefinitely - one for their home computer and one for a portable device. Universal said it could 'completely revolutionise' how people watch movies. However users will not be able to burn copies of the films to DVD themselves and the files will be compatible only with PCs and Windows software." BBC 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 7:58 pm

TV Whenever You Want (Even When You Don't) For the first time, TV is available anywhere you have access to your cellphone. In fact, TV is about to be anywhere and everywhere, period... The New York Times 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 7:07 pm

Click here for more Media stories...

Media stories submitted by readers
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

Dance

A Blend Of Modern And Aboriginal Australian Ballet and Bangarra Dance Theatre (an aboriginal company) collaborate on a piece. "The traditional Aboriginal element of dance and that kind of spirit that flows through the movement is what makes it so unique, and such an amazing hybrid of old and new..." Sydney Morning Herald 03/24/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 10:24 pm

Click here for more Dance stories...

Dance stories submitted by readers
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story


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Geoff Pevere. "You can fill newspapers with page upon page of global atrocities, injustices and outrages and expect very little by way of indignant outrage expressed by your readers. But suggest they might have been wrong about loving Star Wars? For this you bring down the wrath of the heavens." Toronto Star 03/24/06
Posted: 03/24/2006 6:53 am

UK Movies - Buy, Rip, Burn UK movie fans will soon be able to buy and download movies online. "Fans will pay 19.99 for a DVD of their chosen film plus two digital copies to keep indefinitely - one for their home computer and one for a portable device. Universal said it could 'completely revolutionise' how people watch movies. However users will not be able to burn copies of the films to DVD themselves and the files will be compatible only with PCs and Windows software." BBC 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 7:58 pm

TV Whenever You Want (Even When You Don't) For the first time, TV is available anywhere you have access to your cellphone. In fact, TV is about to be anywhere and everywhere, period... The New York Times 03/23/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 7:07 pm

Click here for more Media stories...

Media stories submitted by readers
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story

Dance

A Blend Of Modern And Aboriginal Australian Ballet and Bangarra Dance Theatre (an aboriginal company) collaborate on a piece. "The traditional Aboriginal element of dance and that kind of spirit that flows through the movement is what makes it so unique, and such an amazing hybrid of old and new..." Sydney Morning Herald 03/24/06
Posted: 03/23/2006 10:24 pm

Click here for more Dance stories...

Dance stories submitted by readers
More reader-submitted stories... | submit a story


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