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Class One, Entrepreneurship in Music and the Arts

The most surprising aspect of my first class was the result of my asking the question, “why are you taking this class”

The responses altered my thinking on the teaching of arts entrepreneurship to students to whom the topic is new.

I only allowed for approximately 10 responses (there were 30 students in the room). The responses ran from, I want to pursue a career in arts administration, to those that were quite specific, from graduate students who are already embarking on nascent careers. Those in this group expressed a need to specific skills: in fund raising, marketing, etc.

Our discussion at the end of the class, as a result of the questions I posed (previous blog) and an open-ended Q&A, centered on issues involving American orchestras, the financial structure of large music organizations, and the impact of pop culture (the truly vapid variety) on music in general.

This experience reinforces my growing belief that the field of arts entrepreneurship remains ill defined.

“You know you need it, but aren’t quite sure what it is.”

I’m excited about working with this group of young people. They are articulate, intelligent and motivated. Look for continuing posts about them and the class structure.

Comments

  1. Jim:

    I’m not convinced that the field is “ill-defined” but rather that the field is developing. The fundamental question – for me at least – is “Is arts entrepreneurship a discipline unto itself or (merely) the application of entrepreneurial processes to arts disciplines?” I raise this question in the opening article of the first issue of “Artivate: A Journal of Entrepreneurship in the Arts” available at http://www.artivate.org/?p=137 and hope to find some answers at the AAAE conference in March, at which Andrew Taylor, Margaret Wyszomirski, Susan Badger Booth and I will participate in a roundtable discussion “What Do We Mean When We Talk About Arts Entrepreneurship?” based on the definitional issues raised in the Artivate piece.

    Hopefully, we’ll see you there!

    – Linda

  2. Bruce Brubaker says:

    I want to urge the broadest inclusiveness in considering what “entrepreneurship” may be. Art itself is entrepreneurship. Beethoven was a fine entrepreneur — and so was John Cage.

  3. Nice post which the responses altered my thinking on the teaching of arts entrepreneurship to students to whom the topic is new. This experience reinforces my growing belief that the field of arts entrepreneurship remains ill defined. Thanks a lot for posting.

  4. The second issue of Artivate focuses on arts entrepreneurship pedagogy. I hope you will find it useful: http://www.artivate.org/?p=317 -LE

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