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Tacking on to Undercofler and Taylor: What Do Graduates of Arts Colleges Need to Know and Be Able To Do?

I've been following the recent posts of Jim Undercofler and Andrew Taylor: Jim's post, Arts Entrepreneurship -- Lack of Imagination, Lack of Chutzpah? was followed up by Andrew's post, Is Arts Entrepreneurship Training  Really Just Career Prep?So, here's my tack-on, making for a trio on the subject.Today, much of the K-12 education debate is being framed by what a student needs to know and be able to do in college and career. What is more, increasingly, educators are looking at continuum of education that is P-16, rather than K-12, meaning … [Read more...]

David Brooks Gets It Right

It seems simple, but that is not what is happening. Instead, legislators and administrators are simply cutting on the basis of what's politically easy and what vaguely seems expendable. In education, many administrators are quick to cut athletics, band, cheerleading, art and music because they have the vague impression that those are luxuries. In fact, they are exactly the programs that keep kids in school and build character. Click here to read The New Normal, The New York Times, March 1, 2011. … [Read more...]

From Tikkun Magazine: Arts Education as a Spriritual Act

From Joel Shatzky and Tikkun Magazine comes Arts Education as a Spiritual Act.As this trend continues to evolve and grow, the spiritual qualities of America which was once, in the words of Abraham Lincoln, the "last best hope of mankind" will have been extinguished, while along with the intellectual and cultural environment, the physical environment will continue to decline. In order to see the consequences of this "educational reform" movement let's examine what a large proportion of our young learners are not being adequately taught as "test … [Read more...]

Scorched Earth Educational Policy: Toledo Public School System to Eliminate All Elementary School Arts and Phys Ed

That's right, ALL arts and physical education. Click here to read End of Art in School Means End of A Legacy, from the Toledo Examiner.There was a radio interview with one of the Board of Education members and when they were asked when the child will be introduced to music the person said "...they can learn in church..." … [Read more...]

How Important is Arts Education? The New York Times Asks Students

From The Learning Network of The New York Times, comes How Important is Arts Education?, by Katherine Schulten.As a follow-up to Chloe Veltman's recent piece on how youth choirs are flourishing despite cuts in arts education, Schulten asks the students to respond to:Does your school offer classes in music, drama, dance or the visual arts? What experiences have you had with arts classes yourself, whether in or outside of school? How important do you think arts education is for students in general? Why? Here are a couple of excerpts from the … [Read more...]

More on Belinda Reynolds’s Manifesto: Where Art Thou Composition in Music Ed?

Those who know music education, know that for many years research has indicated that creative music making, meaning composition and improvisation, is taught at a distinctly lower frequency than other types of musical activities not centered in musical creation, but instead interpretation.So, as a a follow-up to Belinda Reynolds's Manifesto, I thought it would be interesting to note that of all 2010 grants made by the National Endowment for the Arts for arts education, a total of seven include music composition as an essential activity, with … [Read more...]

On The Declining Field of Concert Music

The New York Times recently published a feature story on the state of concert music freelancing: Freelance Musicians Hear Mournful Coda as the Jobs Dry Up.It was a good living. But the New York freelance musician -- a bright thread in the fabric of the city -- is dying out. In an age of sampling, digitization and outsourcing, New York's soundtrack and advertising-jingle recording industry has essentially collapsed. Broadway jobs are in decline. Dance companies rely increasingly on recorded music. And many freelance orchestras, among the last … [Read more...]

Guest Blogger, Jane Remer: The New Messiah: Are the Arts Waiting for Godot…er, Superman or Woman?

Let's welcome back Jane Remer to Dewey21C. It's been a bit of time since her last guest entry. I know I missed her. How about you? --RK************************************************************************************************************Jane Remer's CliffNotesThe New Messiah: Are the Arts Waiting for Godot...er, Superman or woman? October 4, 2010 The latest flurry that has caught the interest of some, but by no means all, Americans (after all, we have the play-offs, football, latest sex scandal, questionable police shooting, the economy, … [Read more...]

Books. Children. Arts. Education!

It's never too early to consider your holiday gift list. Today, I present to you a lucky 13 list of primarily arts-oriented books for children. The wonderful thing about these books, which for me is a big-time measure of children's book quality overall, is that adults will enjoy these books just as much as the kids.The list runs the gamut of music, dance, drama, and visual art. When Pigasso Met Mootisse The book cover tells you all you want to know. A lovely and fun book. I stand self-corrected: A great children's book.My sister Linda and her … [Read more...]

Former Arts Endowment Official Takes Arts Ed Advocates To Task

In the new edition of Education Next, Mark Bauerlein takes a dim view of the nature of arts education advocacy and offers a prescription for improvement, namely a focus on arts as a discrete discipline and a more entrepreneurial approach overall.Click on through to read Advocating for Arts in the Classroom.In essence, Bauerlein sees a field of arts education advocates who have the wrong message, are disconnected from real schools, and fail to seek solutions outside of the public sector. While I admire Bauerlein's passion, the piece had an out … [Read more...]

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