Museums Have Gotten Technology All Wrong. So Stop!

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“This obsession with new technology is based on the patronising belief that engaging the public means geeing them up and making the museum experience ‘fun-filled’ and purposefully ‘enlightening’. Even more pernicious is the belief that grabbing the young, before they know any better, will create future audiences.”

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Full-Frontal Jesus in Late Medieval Art

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Lee Siegel: “But in casting aside Christ’s garments, the Franciscans made Christ’s nude body a focal point. As a result, according to Steinberg, from about the middle of the thirteenth century until the sixteenth century artists lavished particular care on Christ’s penis, the part of Christ’s body that made him most mortal, and which proved his union with humankind.”

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New Owner Promises Handmade Steinways for Years to Come

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“For 160 years, the pianos made by Steinway & Sons have been considered the finest in the world. So when hedge fund billionaire John Paulson recently bought the company, it struck fear in the hearts of musicians: Would the famously handcrafted pianos be changed, for the sake of efficiency?”

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What Happened When Andres Serrano Bought Signs From Homeless People

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They always said yes and I’d say, “I’m an artist. And artists see things in a different way. And one of the things I see are the signs the homeless have. I’m buying these signs because I see every sign as a story. There are many stories out here that should be heard. Can I offer you $20 for your sign?” They would all say yes, and it touched me how grateful many people were when I bought their sign. I got several hugs and many a “God bless you.”

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Seven Reasons Listicles Capture Our Attention (and Confuse Our Brains)

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Derek Thompson: “Rankings create order where there is chaos. They enumerate the innumerable variety of the world and give us a small sense of mastery over our environment. … They’re also devious in both obvious ways (they can be wrong, and not everything is rank-able) and surprising ways that researchers are only beginning to understand.”

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How Economics Really Got The Nickname “The Dismal Science”

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“The story goes like this: Thomas Carlyle, a Scottish writer and philosopher, called economics ‘the dismal science’ in reference to Thomas Malthus, that lugubrious economist who claimed humanity was trapped in a world where population growth would always strain natural resources and bring widespread misery.” Turns out that what Carlyle was saying was far more dismal (not to mention abhorrent).

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Author Hired To Write Stieg Larsson Sequel

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“The head of publishing at Norstedts, Eva Gedin, told The Associated Press the book will be an original work that includes nothing from the fourth book in the series that Larsson began writing but hadn’t finished when he died.”

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Art In 2013 – Only For The Wealthy?

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“Art and critical thinking, yes. Art and enchantment, for certain. Without both, or without either, art and its encircling vocation of criticism risk irrelevance. A bigger problem is the culture of prohibitions we seem to be engendering against creativity.”

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Novelist Hugh Nissenson, 80

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“[His] books were immersive journeys that often explored religion, particularly Judaism, often to high praise by reviewers. They were not strong sellers, however, and throughout his life Mr. Nissenson struggled with depression … But he never stopped writing.”

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