A First: Brain-To-Brain Communication

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“We wanted to find out if one could communicate directly between two people by reading out the brain activity from one person and injecting brain activity into the second person, and do so across great physical distances by leveraging existing communication pathways.”

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The Ten Most Politically Controversial TV Shows In History

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“‘A slanderous farce.’ No, not The Great British Bake Off‘s ‘bincident’, but Pyongyang’s response to Channel 4’s newly announced 10-part drama Opposite Number, about a British scientist captured in North Korea. … It wouldn’t be the first fictional TV show to create a political firestorm …” (includes video clips)

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Designing Technology That Lies To Us

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“If you don’t know it already, you should: Many crosswalk and elevator door-close buttons don’t actually work as advertised. … Similarly, the progress bars presented on computer screens during downloads … maintain virtually no connection to the actual amount of time left … But these examples offer only a hint of what we’re liable to see in the near future. … Perhaps now is a good time to ask: How deceitful should our new technologies be?”

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Frederick Wiseman Is Moving From Ballet Documentaries To Creating An Actual Ballet

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As part of his residency at NYU’s new Center for Ballet and the Arts, Wiseman and choreographer James Sewell are collaborating on a stage work based on – no, not his dance documentaries, but his 1967 fim Titicut Follies, about the Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane in Massachusetts.

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Study: Few Brits Are Exposed To Theatre When They’re Young

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“Results of the first wave of a ‘tracking study’ conducted by King’s College London’s Culture and Major Events Consortium, commissioned by KCL as part of its Culture at King’s programme, showed that 46% of respondents went to the theatre as children, compared with 86% who went to libraries and 75% who visited museums and art galleries.”

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Why Has The BBC Been Editing New Music Out Of Its Proms Broadcasts?

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Prominent figures from the classical music world have united to condemn the excision of new music from the televised Proms. Susanna Eastburn, the chief executive of Sound and Music, the national agency for new music, said it was “a policy-by-implication which assumes that audiences won’t like new music, and that it’s not valued by the BBC”.

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Is The Internet Changing How Our Brains Work?

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“Part of the difficulty with discussing the effects of Internet use is that there are many ways to use the Internet, and there are many ways for it to have an effect – from how we conduct our relationships to how we think, to how our brains are wired up.”

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Oldest-Known Neanderthal Art Discovered (But Is It Really Art?)

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“The engraved lines found on Gibraltar are said to be 40,000 years old, making them older than the the oldest-known cave paintings by Homo sapiens,which can be seen in the Chauvet-Pont-d’Arc Cave in southern France. It certainly seems that the capacity for symbolic thought is not unique to Homo sapiens, but do the incised lines of Gibraltar really prove a capacity for advanced thought? Can we call them “art” at all?”

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Books In Translation Don’t Sell? That’s A Canard

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“Books in translation do sell, and at bestseller levels … The Name of the Rose sold. Smilla’s Sense of Snow sold. The Elegance of the Hedgehog sold. Suite Française sold. It seems, in fact, fair to expect that every couple of years will bring a bestseller in translation, and the more worthwhile question to consider is not whether books in translation sell, but whether those bestsellers are predictable, whether there are cycles, and in that context, whether the present moment is exceptional.”

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RSC To Stage Forgotten Play By John “‘Tis Pity She’s A Whore” Ford For First Time In Four Centuries

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The revenge tragedy Love’s Sacrifice, “published in 1633 during the reign of Charles I and hardly performed since, was chosen out of 16 works proposed by four academics for the [RSC's] Scholars Pitch programme,” in which experts nominate a neglected play from Shakespeare’s era for revival.

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What Do You Get When You Cross “Survivor” With “Dungeons And Dragons”?

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You get “a world of inept archery and ill-fitting armor, where people who have no business trying to save a kingdom have been given the responsibility to do just that.” You get The Quest, “set in a fictional kingdom called Everealm, but it actually takes place in the Land of LARP: live-action role playing” – into which ABC has transplanted the standard one-elimination-per-week competition show.

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Top Posts From AJBlogs 09.03.14

Good News From The Middle East
AJBlog: Real Clear Arts | Published 2014-09-04

An LA Novelist Pleads With Amazon
AJBlog: CultureCrash | Published 2014-09-04

Frank Gehry Works His Magic on the Philadelphia Museum (with videos)
AJBlog: CultureGrrl | Published 2014-09-03

Flowering Barbed Wire Means War
(in praise of Sir Jonathan Mills’s eight years at the helm of the Edinburgh Int’l Festival)
AJBlog: Plain English | Published 2014-09-03

Gramex to U.S. classical collectors: “Send us your enemies!”
AJBlog: Condemned to Music | Published 2014-09-03

Jennifer Homans To Lead New NYU Center On Study Of Dance

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“Her new organization, the Center for Ballet and the Arts at New York University, where she is a scholar in residence, will open this month with the help of a $2 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Ms. Homans said that its goals include establishing ballet as a serious subject of academic inquiry; drawing new voices into a discussion of its past, present and future; and expanding the conversation beyond the confines of the dance world.”

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Down To The Wire At The Atlanta Symphony Contract Talks

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“We must avoid the residue of discord and acrimony. The concept that stopping the music — whether characterized as lockout or strike — as a reasonable alternative is unfathomable, deeply divisive, and would be a tragic mistake.” – See more at:

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