A Rebellion At The Venice Architecture Biennale

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“As a result of this unanticipated and welcome rebellion, this year’s Biennale offers an unforgettably wide-ranging, if scattershot, survey of modern and contemporary 
architectural history that will forever demolish the popular notion of what modernism in architecture was.”

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Where Will The Arts Be In 20 Years? Michael Kaiser Predicts …

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“We are at the beginning of a major change in the way people receive their arts, and I believe online will become the source and a major competitor to live arts. And it appears to me that we will see a bifurcation of arts organizations, with the large ones, who will make revenue based on selling performances online, and local organizations who service the community. I am very nervous about the midsize regional organization.”

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How Heiner Goebbels Got Harry Partch’s Insane Magnum Opus Onto The Stage

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“Partch’s masterpiece is the bizarre 1960s music drama Delusion of the Fury. It is outlandish and magnificent and … if it is hardly ever staged that’s because it can’t be: it requires its very own orchestra of hand-built instruments, each one specially invented by Partch to play his unique microtonal music.” But Goebbels – who has created a few insane music-theater spectacles of his own in his day – pulled it off.

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Are Experimental Films Elitist? (Nope)

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“British experimental film has a long tradition of engagement with political and social issues and this goes against a common misconception: that the art form is irrelevant to mainstream audiences. … BBC Culture’s Rebecca Laurence discusses trends in British experimental film with the London Film Festival’s Experimenta programmer, Helen de Witt.” (video)

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UK Government Hopes Tax Relief Will Revitalize Touring Theatre

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“The major new tax relief scheme was confirmed by the government earlier this year and means that from Monday, touring shows can apply for 25% relief and non touring productions will be eligible for a 20% tax credit on qualifying production costs. It will apply to plays, musicals, opera, ballet, dance and circus shows and is expected to bring in up to £120 million for touring and commercial productions in future years. It is expected to benefit around 250 production companies a year.”

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Look, Great Art Belongs In The Capital, Not The Provinces

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“I didn’t invent London. It has dominated British culture since the 18th century and has never exerted more global cultural power than today. Tourists from all over the world are flocking, right now, to London for its renowned galleries. It is a stage on which artists are made and ruined.”

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MPAA’s Movie Ratings Are Capricious And Odd (The Latest Example)

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“MPAA ratings administrators have always resisted strict rules and regulations when determining what instances and degrees of rough language, nudity and violence can lead to a PG, or PG-13, or R, or the supremely rare NC-17. Narrowing this to the language question, these variances nonetheless are chaotic at best.”

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An Aboriginal Dance Company Explores Australia’s Cultural History

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Bangarra Dance Theatre is Australia’s most famous indigenous performing arts group, popular at home and overseas. Supporters argue that it gives today’s indigenous Australians an important way to retell and process their own history – not to mention providing all-too-scarce employment for aboriginal performers. “[But] some critics have described Bangarra’s liberal use of traditional indigenous dance spiced up with modern moves as a Disneyfication of aboriginal culture.”

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