Tiler Peck Transforms Herself Into The World’s Most Famous Ballet Statue

Degas little dancer

“With her strong jaw and confidently bared breastbone, Degas’s Little Dancer statuette … absolutely does not care what we think. Yet her mystique has only grown. Who was that girl, really? And who was she to Degas? These questions fuel [a new] musical, which is reportedly part fact, part fantasy,” in which Peck is starring this fall.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Penguin Defends “Creepy” Cover Of “Charlie And The Chocolate Factory”

dahl book cover

“Members of the public reacted angrily when the new edition – part of the Penguin Modern Classics range – was revealed [last] Wednesday. The cover was deemed ‘misleading’ and ‘creepy’. Author Giles Paley-Phillips said it looked ‘more like Lolita‘. But Penguin said it stressed ‘the light and the dark aspects’ of Dahl’s work.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Can Digital Tech Help Build A Better Piano?

science build a better piano

That’s what acoustical scientists at NYU are trying to find out, as they bring banks of microphones and a Disklavier out to the Steinway factory to gather “a very dense acoustical scan of the radiation pattern of the grand piano.” (includes audio)

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Dylan Thomas Is Underrated. Why? Embarrassment

dylan thomas

“[There’s] a degree of cultural and political embarrassment to start with – over a writer whose near-total indifference to politics is still startling and whose attitudes to women are likely to win few allies today. But there is a deeper embarrassment yet. For so many male readers, he is the quintessential poet of adolescence. How many of us were convinced on reading him that this was what poetry was really like, heady, incantatory, obsessively sensual? How many proceeded to write terrible imitations of him in the back of school notebooks? That is what people wince over.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Top Posts From AJBlogs 08.10.14

Ask The Curator: The Secret Life Of Cezanne’s Apples
AJBlog: Real Clear Arts | Published 2014-08-11

Know when to fold ‘em
AJBlog: For What it’s Worth | Published 2014-08-10

Defining R & D in the cultural sector: why we need innovation in grantmaking strategy
AJBlog: Speaker | Published 2014-08-10

A Fountain of Music and Love
AJBlog: Dancebeat | Published 2014-08-10

Waging War on Middlebrow
AJBlog: CultureCrash | Published 2014-08-08

Sotheby’s Earnings Conference Call: The Cost of Activist Shareholders
AJBlog: CultureGrrl | Published 2014-08-08

Even Dogs Get That Eureka! Feeling (And So Do Cows)

dog eureka

Recent research from Sweden found “that when dogs solved the problem and earned a reward they wagged their tails more and were more eager to repeat the experience than if they were just given a reward.” The study was inspred by earlier research showing a similar effect in cattle. (How could they tell?)

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Met Opera Rejected Pay Freeze Offer From Union: Report

US banknotes A

“Sources tell NY1 that a letter from James Claffey, the President of Local 1, sent to members in the stagehands union earlier this week, said the Met rejected a proposal to freeze union wages for the next five years. Instead, opera management pushed for a 14.5 percent cut in pay and benefits.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Multidisciplinary Public Art Event Actually Wins TV Ratings (It Was Amazingly Popular In Person, Too)

Lumenocity 3

Lumenocity, a collaboration between the Cincinnati Symphony, Cincinnati Ballet, and video artists Brave Berlin – projecting intricate images onto the façade of Music Hall – was that media market’s top-rated TV broadcast last Saturday. And all 42,500 free tickets available for the three-night run were snapped up in 12 minutes. (includes video)

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

FringeNYC – Not Your Father’s Fringe Festival? Well, It Is Now

nyc fringe oldsters

“Common sense might suggest that artists well ensconced in their careers would look askance at FringeNYC’s no-frills, DIY ethic … But to Ms. Prince and other longtime grown-ups, the chance to present a show cheaply in New York is a potent lure, even if each production has only 15 minutes to put up its set and 15 minutes to strike it afterward.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

A Toronto Titan At 70 And His Plans To Transform The City

mirvish_and_gehry.jpg.size.xxlarge.letterbox

“Plans for the still massive and transformative project he and architect Frank Gehry are orchestrating for King St. W. could take a decade to execute. But there’s no sign that the man who runs the empire created by his father, a.k.a. Honest Ed, has any plans to scale back his own role as presiding czar.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Radio Station Cuts All Songs To Two Minutes

lana_del_rey_at_glastonbury_2014.jpg.size.xxlarge.letterbox

“In a nutshell, QuickHitz doesn’t care if you’re Drake, Lorde or Lana Del Rey. Your single is going to get cut down to about two minutes, with a hard target of 24 songs — about twice the number common to a patient society — during each hour of airtime.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

$20 Million Loss As Cancellations Mount At Israeli Festivals

israels-live-events-cee-lo-lana-del-rey-lady-gaga-2014-bb25-biilboard-650

Summer is the high season for large-scale outdoor concerts and festivals — “a city like Jerusalem has festivals practically every week”. And though local performers are inured to the threat of attacks, local police are refusing to grant permits for outdoor gatherings. The result is that hotels, restaurants and bands take a financial hit. “Suddenly, they’re stuck in Europe for two days. If they’ve got a large entourage and crew, putting them up can be quite expensive.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Peter Sculthorpe, Australia’s Leading Composer, Dead At 85

peter sculthorpe

“For many, Sculthorpe defined what it meant to be an Australian composer and defined a uniquely Australian sound. … He would become our most acclaimed contemporary composer, admired for pieces like his 1960s series Irkanda – ‘scrub country’ – … and later work such as Kakadu (1988), Memento Mori (1993) and the Rites of Passage, originally commissioned for the opening of the Sydney Opera House.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter