As LGBT Bookstores Close, Will They Take LGBT Publishers Down With Them?

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“At a bookstore, you can browse the shelves, open a book, sample its pages as well as those of its peers shelved in the same category or by the same author. With Amazon, if you do not know the author or the title or a great deal of the plot; your chances of finding that book you overheard friends talking about is like a pricking yourself while rolling in a haystack.”

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Revisiting James Joyce’s Dublin 100 Years Later

The James Joyce House.

“If you’re a person whose perception of the world is shaped by literature, Dublin can feel less like a place that James Joyce wrote about than a place that is about James Joyce’s writing. The city of his fiction exists in ghostly superimposition over the actual city … Joyce will not be escaped. He inheres in the city’s bones.”

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‘Fun Home’ And ‘Here Lies Love’ Dominate Off-Broadway’s Top Awards

Lortels Fun Home

A disco bioplay of Imelda Marcos, Here Lies Love took five Lucille Lortel Awards, including for director and lead actress, while lesbian-and-gay-themed musical memoir (and South Carolina lightning rod) Fun Home won the best musical prize and two acting awards. Lisa Kron, who wrote the book for Fun Home, took honors of her own for best featured actress in a play.

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Has Boston Run Out Of Rehearsal Space?

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“The city has run out of rehearsal space. These days there’s hardly anywhere for a cello and a marimba to meet. In neighborhoods across Boston, musicians lug unwieldy instruments up the stairs of triple-deckers for “house” rehearsals because it’s the only place to practice. But leases routinely prohibit the playing of instruments, and, in any case, apartment rehearsals are limited to the goodwill and noise tolerance of neighbors.”

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Cell Phone Vandalism Mars Carnegie Concerts

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“Sometimes, you almost suspect there are concert saboteurs with cellphones poised to disrupt a performance at the most crucial moment. You see? Here I am going on about an infuriating cellphone when I should be describing the Philadelphia Orchestra’s superb concert.”

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An Iowa Symphony Orchestra Is Thriving. Here’s How

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“Orchestra Iowa has grown to be the state’s largest not-for-profit performing organization in terms of budget and performance schedule. That budget has doubled from a low of $1.6 million right after the flood, and 150 concerts are staged per year in the Corridor, in all Cedar Rapids and Iowa City schools and in venues in such cities as Fairfield, Davenport, Mason City, Ottumwa and Coralville.”

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Is The Infomercial Dead? (Please, Please Say Yes)

The Perfect Bacon Bowl.

“The golden age began in 1984 when President Reagan deregulated the television industry, allowing broadcasters to sell larger chunks of time to advertisers. That year also saw a significant cable television growth spurt, exploding the number of channels needing content. In 1984–1995, marketers rediscovered the ‘the power of the half-hour,’ and fortunes were made.”

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New York Is Eating Into Hollywood (Again)

Emma Stone

“New York had a record number of film and TV projects last year and is on track to do the same in 2014, state officials say. Credit goes to generous financial incentives, experienced crews that rival Hollywood’s best and friendly (some might say star-struck) politicians.”

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Jane Jacobs Vs. Robert Moses: The Opera (Wait, THE OPERA?)

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“A group of New York artists is working on an opera telling the story of Jacobs’s fight against Moses’s utopian schemes to raze Manhattan neighbourhoods. The battles turned Jacobs, a freelance journalist married to an architect, into an activist and formed her thinking about urban issues articulated in her 1961 book The Death and Life of Great American Cities.”

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