Listen to Orson Welles’s Legendary Shakespeare Productions Online

Orson Welles Shakespeare

“Being a trailblazer in both radio and the stage, Welles adapted many of his stage productions for the wireless. The Internet Archive has posted many of these recordings online, which you can listen to for free. The selection includes performances of Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, Richard III, Macbeth and, of course, Julius Caesar, among others. In most cases, these recordings – along with a few set photos – are the only documents left of Welles’s groundbreaking productions.”

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It’s Terrifying To Make Films, But They Must Be Made

Richard Ayoade

Richard Ayoade: “You do this thing that is completely personal and invested and then you find yourself on T4 trying to see if you can throw a hoop over Justin Bieber’s erect nipple and you go, ‘I’m in the most absurd kind of weird light-entertainment world anyway.’”

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Gene Feist, Founder Of Roundabout Theatre Company, Dies At 91

Gene Feist

“Carving out a 150-seat performance space in a basement under a supermarket in Chelsea (now home to the comedy troupe Upright Citizens Brigade) and drawing an audience with an inexpensive subscription offer (three plays for $5 — the first season had 400 subscribers), Mr. Feist assembled a schedule made up largely of revivals of classic plays from various eras.”

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Is The World Ready To Laugh At Hitler?

Timur Vermes

“Books don’t have to educate or turn people into better human beings – they can also just ask questions. If mine makes some readers realise that dictators aren’t necessarily instantly recognisable as such, then I consider it a success.”

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Hollywood + Bible = Scary, But Also Potentially Lucrative

Noah

“If that interest then [develops] into controversy, and if the censorship word comes in, if certain countries start banning it, then that in itself will arouse a little bit of interest, maybe even suspicion. And people will walk through the theater doors, [when earlier] perhaps they thought, ‘Oh, maybe not.’”

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Bring Back The Angry, Unsent Letter!

Angry Unsent Letter

“The unsent angry letter has a venerable tradition. Its purpose is twofold. It serves as a type of emotional catharsis, a way to let it all out without the repercussions of true engagement. And it acts as a strategic catharsis, an exercise in saying what you really think.”

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