Nôtre-Dame de Paris Gets a Lighting Makeover

Notre Dame LEDs

“Many things look better with crisp-edged LEDs – traffic signals, airplane cabins, perhaps even Christmas lights. But what about the moody, atmospheric interior of a 12th-century French-Gothic cathedral?” Oh, yes – have a look and see.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Missing Norman Rockwell Turns Up in Ohio

missing Rockwell

“The 1939 painting, called Sport, was used as one of the many Saturday Evening Post covers for which the artist is well-known. It sold last spring for more than $1 million at an auction in New York and disappeared later last year” – in Queens, yet again.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Sam Mendes’ 25 Tips For Directors

Google ChromeScreenSnapz110

Avoid, please, all metaphors of plays or films as “pinnacles” or “peaks”; treat with absolute scorn the word “definitive”; and if anyone uses the word “masterpiece,” they don’t know what they’re doing. The pursuit of perfection is a mug’s game.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

The Advantages Of Disadvantage

Tropfest New York 2013 In Brooklyn's Prospect Park On June 22nd

“There is this weird thing where having a little bit of resources is worse than having none. Or: having a few numbers of options is worse than having no options. It can be freeing to be at the very bottom.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

The Future Of Books: A Netflix-Like Subscription Model?

apple-ipad-2-well-always1

“So now that we know that it’s possible to deliver books like magazines, to sell them like magazines, and to target them at clusters of readers like magazines, the big question looms: Do book enthusiasts actually want to engage with literature the way they engage with magazines? And can they afford to?”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Tone-Deaf Minnesota Orchestra Board Bobbles Leadership

OsmoVanskaConducting640_1

“This talented orchestra and Vänskä, who resigned as a show of support for his players, have almost come to represent a blue-collar crew who took on the elite in the city. But now with deadlines looming and the newfound attention the orchestra is receiving, there’s also a new pressure on the board to act.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

“Mozart In the Jungle” Gets Picked Up As A Series

mozart-in-the-jungle

Blair Tindall’s memoir turned into an Amazon.com series. “Amazon Studios has settled on four series orders among the 10 pilots the company announced last month were under consideration, according to sources close to the deals.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Is Shakespeare’s Globe Wrong to Visit North Korea?

North Korea

With the London-based company about to begin a two-year global tour of Hamlet that they hope will include every nation on Earth, Amnesty International has given them a scolding for including Kim Jong Un’s domain on the itinerary. Mark Lawson considers the precedent – the long boycott of apartheid-era South Africa – and whether the situations are comparable.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Dancing the First World War

Tamara Rojo rehearses Lest We Forget

English National Ballet artistic director Tamara Rojo and her three choreographers – Liam Scarlett, Russell Maliphant and Akram Khan – talk about creating their upcoming mixed bill, titled Lest We Forget.

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter

Top Posts From AJBlogs 03.11.14

Gerard Mortier’s Last Day in Salzburg (when Viennese Opera found its place on the lunatic fringe)
AJBlog: Condemned to Music | Published 2014-03-12

The Enigma of Acting, and Longing for Adelaide
AJBlog: CultureCrash | Published 2014-03-11

The Met Aces A New Online Feature
AJBlog: Real Clear Arts | Published 2014-03-11

Bruening: Part of the “New Joy” movement in Public Art
AJBlog: Aesthetic Grounds | Published 2014-03-11

 

Haves/Have-Nots: Here’s Who Reads In England

_73487930_ucl_library(2)

“More than one in four (27%) of adults from the poorest socio-economic backgrounds said they never read books themselves, compared with just 13% of those from the richest socio-economic backgrounds.”

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter