How Big Data Is Finding Meaning In Meaningless Data

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“While traditional data analysis tends to focus on data that has intrinsic, meaningful value, Big Data allows us to aggregate otherwise meaningless data and find insight in the group. By way of analogy, it probably won’t tell us much to observe the individual meanderings of an ant, but when observing the colony together, patterns emerge.”

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Harlem’s Apollo Theater Is Going Global

Apollo Theater

“Looking to expand its brand to international proportions, the Apollo Theater is kicking off its 80th anniversary with a series of global initiatives – including a first-ever international tour of its original production about the Godfather of Soul.”

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Playwright Sues to Get His ‘Three’s Company’ Deconstruction Out of Copyright Limbo

3C

After David Adjmi’s 3C had an Off-Broadway run, attorneys for the producers of the old ABC sitcom sent a cease-and-desist letter alleging copyright infringement, and the play has not been staged since. Now Adjmi has gone to U.S. Federal court, arguing that fair-use laws regarding parody proyect him and his script.

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Why Conspiracy Theories Make Some People Go Postal

going postal

Jared Loughner in Tucson. Aaron Alexis at the Washington Navy Yard. Raulie Wayne Casteel in Michigan. Timothy McVeigh. Lots of people believe in strange conspiracy theories; why are some people driven to serial murder because of them?

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What Makes a Book a ‘Classic’ – And When That Question Matters

What Makes a Book Classic - Vonnegut and Wallace

Laura Miller: “That’s one of the most acrimonious, endless and irresolvable discussions in the literary world. … But there are a few places where deciding whether a book is a classic or not has real consequences. One is, obviously, classrooms, but the other is bookstores.” How do, or should, they make that decision?

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Top Posts From AJBlogs 01.30.14

The Cost of Poor Care: Multi-millions Source: Real Clear Arts | Published on 2014-01-31 Looking Back, Dancing Now Source: Dancebeat | Published on 2014-01-31 “Passion” and a Life in the Arts Source: CultureCrash | Published on 2014-01-30 From John Steinmetz: A life-changer Source: Sandow | Published on 2014-01-30  

People, People, People – Why Waste Time Arguing Over An Ill-Informed Article On Classical Music?

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“Classical music isn’t dying. I also say to all of you: some people will write bad articles, and that doesn’t signal the death of journalism, either. But for those of us who love the field, let’s think of more productive ways to marshall our intellectual resources than shooting fish in a barrel and congratulating each […]

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What Kind Of Idiot Steals A Strad?

cd-lipinski

“The nature of the crime suggests that the thieves knew what they were after, which is a downer on one hand and encouraging on the other. If they know what they have, they’re less likely to damage it. But if they know what they have, they might be more likely to have a buyer lined […]

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You Are What You Read? (Uh, Oh – Americans Are In Trouble)

book-shelves

“If we are what we read, then Americans are wimpy, religious, ambitious, self-improving, and patriotic. The specific possibility that the only book any adult read last year was one of the best-selling books on the Nielsen or Amazon list is perhaps more disheartening than the shapeless fact that three-quarters of the American population read only […]

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