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Aussie prime minister attacks opera in Sydney harbour

Paul Keating, the former Labour prime minister, is not one to pull punches. The most classically attuned of Australian pols, he hates the uses of Sydney harbour front as a place to stage outdoor operas.

A “mindless quest for promotional funds” he calls Carmen on the Harbour.

carmen harbour

More here.

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Comments

  1. They day we fail to realise there is a time and place for music is the day we loose all respect for it. Yet, since I can’t take a wee in a public toilet without hearing a muzak version of Aerosmith’s “Walk This Way,” it’s clear we’ve already lost respect.

  2. I’m not sure who can comment on this beyond those well-versed in Sydney’s local politics and OA’s artistic strategy.

  3. Typical politician,just because the focus is not on him!

  4. He is correct! And he is not the only one to think that!

  5. So. . .your PM chooses to be WRONG!

  6. an aussie says:

    Miisleading title…

  7. I agree with him, except I believe it is useful to remember where the mindless urge came from. It is a still-rampant remnant of a mistaken idea to put the very highest musical thoughts before the public by promoting them with unviable Socialist Realist concepts of “bringing the music to the people” no matter what. “Enough” availability is too much. We no longer have picnics in concert halls as they did in the 17th and 18th Centuries, but mindless promoters want concerts at picnic sites, and they thereby make the public mindless, not “more appreciative.”

  8. Jeeez Paawl, gotta poot it owt thair. Oim a bit awefended bout watya sayin bout ou opra.
    may oi tell an ex proim minista thet in moi umbel apinyan thet ow linden terrorcinos doin a grate job given is mates jobs n gettin blokes loik moi outa the pub an down te the arbor te wotch the fiawerks an this opra stuff. jus as well cos they wudnt let moi inta the opraous werin me stubbies n thongs…

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