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Teresa Berganza: Certain opera directors should be put in jail

The celebrated Spanish mezzo, 78, is unhappy with productions that play around with the context of an opera. Here’s what she tells Le Figaro:

berganza-2

 

 

Je n’aime pas ce qu’on fait aujourd’hui, ces mises en scène qui ne respectent ni l’époque ni la musique. Pour moi, l’opéra est une religion, et il faut la respecter comme telle. Est-ce qu’on irait dire à des jeunes: «Le Tintoret est un peintre trop vieux, si l’on rajoutait du rouge ou du jaune fluo pour rendre ses toiles plus modernes?» Le premier qui ferait cela se retrouverait en prison. On devrait en faire autant avec certains metteurs en scène.

I hate what they do today, these stagings that respect neither the period nor the music. For me, opera is a religion, and must be respected as such. Are we to tell young people: “Tintoretto is outdated, we should add red or bright yellow to his paintings to make them more modern?” The first to do that it would find himself in prison. We should do the same with certain (opera) directors.

 

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Comments

  1. Gurnemanz says:

    Name-calling directed at Mrs.Berganza by proponents of Konzept/Eurotrash/Regie in 5…4…3…2…

  2. Dear Norman,

    Teresa Berganza is 80. All the online sources say that she was born in 1935, but it was all based on a slip up years ago (as explained in my post) but she had to come clean this year when the Teatro Real in Madrid put on an 80th Birthday Gala for her.

    She tells a lot of good anecdotes and expounds on her opinions of directors/designers/colleagues in her recently published autobiography “Un monde habité par le chant” – a great read!

    http://www.gramilano.com/2013/06/the-mystery-of-teresa-berganzas-true-age/

  3. The only time I saw a production which was faithful to the “epoch” was at the Opera-Comique a few years ago. Costumes and movements were reproduced from original drawings and it was done (partially) by candlelight. The Comique is a venue with particular sensitivity to this issue due to the 1887 fire which killed 84. When it reopened it was one of the first all-electric theaters. I assume what Ms Berganza is talking about is a return to the “epoch” of her youth where walls waived in the wind, all furniture was red velvet, acting was unknown, wigs moved during a performance and, whenever an aria occurred, the action stopped and the singer came to the edge of the proscenium. This is apparently her Tintoretto?

    • Walls do not have to wave and wigs fall. You miss the point Frank, she is talking about respect for the genre. Many today feel that opera needs to be hip to be relevant. A pity that some have difficulty connecting to the past and universal emotions. Its the same in the plastic arts, the art fairs are full of gaudy, trendy trivia marketed to the nouveau riche. Past present and future exists together. There is no need to update, unless it is by the artist himself.

    • How wrong you are Frank. The singers of the past were the truly great singing artists and not the puppets of depraved stage directors who are called opera singers today. Opera lives because of great singing artists like Teresa Berganza. That is why the artform is dying Frank. Ask City Opera

  4. Sänger in Deutschland says:

    The problem with this entire debate is that it is being debated as though it were a theological debate between fundamentalists of two entirely different religions. If we are to believe Mme. Berganza, there can be be no modernity, and if we are to believe Frank, to follow tradition whatsoever is to be stuck in some dark age where modern advancements in set and costume design, and any semblance of stagecraft is to be ignored. The performance that Frank describes is a product of convention, but Regietheater and/or only modernized productions as de rigeur is just as much a convention. Many pieces are dramaturgically weak and full of conventions that do not lend themselves well to traditional stagings, while many others are so explicitly linked to a specific setting and time period that they do not adapt well to a modern staging. There is a lot of middle ground that can be occupied by those who know what they’re doing and respect the requirements of staging a drama in which the main performers must sing without amplification over an orchestra.

  5. Baltazzi Phebe says:

    Taking time to read the entire article of the newspaper “Teresa Berganza : «Les compositeurs sont mes dieux, Mozart est mon messie !» one conclusion can be drawn in my opinion: one that has the capacity to understand and primarely respect another person’s opinion cannot but agree with her ! Unfortunately sensitivity and nobility is much at stake in an age in which boundaries are being surpressed and demonised in the name of “modernity”- wrongly undertood creativity-, and “personal gusto” …!!! As every age has its charme, let it also so for music!

  6. harold braun says:

    But without parole!!!

  7. Regardless of what anyone thinks about certain ways of staging opera, such a statement is not only stupid, but shows a clear lack of respect towards artists of any kind who in some countries face prison and torture because of their political and/or religious views, their sexual orientation etc.

    • Stupid is supporting criminal directors who destroy opera masterpieces and make opera an awful experience for both public and performers. I would say further, but you got the gist.

      • “Criminal” usually refers to things such as murder, rape, robbery etc. So you claim a poor opera production is equivalent to those?

        And fortunatley opera masterpieces can’t be destroyed unless you destroy all existing copies of the score, all recordings etc. This is why Ms. Berganza’s Tintoretto-comparison doesn’t work.

      • Hear Hear! I couldn’t agree more!

  8. John E Niles says:

    I love to see interesting and well conceived Modern Productions. What Ms.Berganza is talking about is not MODERN PRODUCTIONS. There really some good new productions out there. Even in the world of Regie-
    Theatr.
    But I believe the best maxim for ALL stage directors is to first GO TO THE SCORE. Read the score, Listen to the music. And if you cannot read Music correctly–and 95% of todays Stage Directors cannot–the DO NOT STAGE THE DAMN OPERA!!!!
    Pichas Zukerman got into all kinds of hot water when he said in an article about 15 years ago that a lot of CONDUCTORS today–particularly those who advocate ORIGINAL INSTRUMENTS–do NOT know how to really read a score. Perhaps Mr. Zukerman’s admonition pertains to todays stage directors as all.
    Particularly with Wagner. RW was a stage director himself. He wrote his operas as a man of the theater. You want to stage a WAGNER OPERA: Look at the damn score and really read the score Both Horizontally (The flow of the music) and Vertically (The Harmony and Rhythm—and I mean REALLY analyze it. Don’t just look at it and go on from there!!!)

    • Baltazzi Phebe says:

      Thank you for your interesting comment…!

    • I agree – if it weren’t for your excessive use of capital letters. ;-)

      The point is: There are good and bad productions (and of course lots somewhere in the middle). And there are “traditional” and “modern” productions (same diclaimer applies). Some “modern” productions are good, some “modern” productions are bad. The same with “traditional” productions.

      I would like to praise everyone who speaks out against bad productions, be they “traditional” oder “modern”. But most of those who speak out and are quoted on Slipped Disc make the impression that they don’t reject bad productions for being bad but would like to ban everything which doesn’t fit with their opinion of how a “traditional” production should look like.

      And yes, some (bad) stage directors make the impression that they don’t read the score but only a short plot summary. But this doesn’t mean “modern” productions as such are bad.

      • Simon says: “The point is: There are good and bad productions (and of course lots somewhere in the middle). And there are “traditional” and “modern” productions (same diclaimer applies). Some “modern” productions are good, some “modern” productions are bad. The same with “traditional” productions.”

        It’s so true! I have seen some really terrible Regietheater productions, some good ones too; but — ditto with “traditional” productions.

        But I guess it is too boring to take this middle position. You get more coverage if you simply blast all productions in the style you don’t like.

        I can’t, for instance, accept Mme Berganza’s position that all productions must be “d’époque.” Meaning, I suppose, that all Mozart productions must be done in 18th century costume? But I have seen some productions of Mozart operas that worked very well where the period was moved around — sometimes into contemporary times, sometimes simply into some historic era other than the 1700s.

    • Edgar Brenninkmeyer says:

      I just had the immense joy of experiencing the RING in Seattle. The production was directed by Stephen Wadsworth, who first staged the RING in 2001, and then improved the production in 2005 and 2009, and now in 2013: the fourth and last run of three cycles of this production. It was abundantly clear throughout this entire RING that here was a director at work who indeed had studied and analyzed the score most thoroughly. Seattle’s RING has been decried by some as “traditional”, but General Director Speight Jenkins prefers to call it a “Green Ring”: the scenery makes one feel indeed to be present in the forests of the Olympia Mountains. And yet: in 2010, one year after having seen Seattle’s RING for the first time, I had the equally immense joy of experiencing LA Opera’s RING, with sets and costumes as well as direction by the German painter and director Achim Freyer (who spent four years in a LA loft to paint and to work on the RING). Freyer’s RING was widely decried as “Eurotrash”. But once I overcame my initial bewilderment vis a vis the color and imagery of Freyer, I became aware how deeply in touch he was with Wagner’s score. I even can say that, because of Freyer’s imaginative production, I heard certain parts of the RING as if for the first time: subtle contexts became clear. Freyer, like Wadsworth, had himself immersed deeply into Wagner’s score, and responded with very different artistic “language”, but no less profound. Wagner would have been proud of both Stephen Wadworth and Achim Freyer, in my opinion. By the way: neither the Seattle nor the LA RING will be available on DVD. That is good. Because each of these RINGs will continue to profoundly affect my memory, and contribute to my deeper appreciation of Wagner’s work. “Work in progress”, I guess… My reply to John E Niles is a bit late, as I gradually emerge from “RING-mode” after returning home.

  9. for a review of her book, see http://www.operanostalgia.be, scroll down on the homepage till you see the book cover coming up, should be a good read

  10. jopie frank says:

    Dear Teresa,…………..I agree on every single word you say about “modern” productions.
    Thank you so much for saying it.

  11. For me there is firstly “right ” and “Wrong”. Only the productions on the right side qualify for me to be discussed as ” Good ” or ” bad”. This means I reject “modern” or Regietheater productions by priniciple. I am glad to see that more and more singers say what they believe in that matter!

    • Of course it’s your right to reject “modern” “Regietheater” productions as a matter of principle. So do I reject many things like, say, yellow press, jazz, beach volleyball etc.

      But I acknowledge that others enjoy these things and don’t call for the responsibles to be jailed.

  12. There’s a certain thread in her logic which reminds me of the early 2000s anti-download lobby.

    “You wouldn’t steal a car, so don’t steal music.”
    “If you deface a painting, you would go to jail. The same should go for opera.”

    Car / Painting: valuable irreproducible physical object
    Music / Opera: not a physical object

  13. Willem Bruls says:

    I appreciated Mrs Berganza enormously as a singer and I am quite sure there has never been a better Italiana (Rossini) than her’s.

    But, she makes a mistake about modern stagings and regie. Her comparison with Tintoretto touches a nerve.

    Firstly because Tintoretto’s Crucifixion at the Scuola di San Rocco in Venice is one of the most beautiful and most superb paintings I have ever seen in my entire life. Especially the mourning women at the bottom of the cross.

    Secondly, because one object of art is very different from the reproductive and recreational arts (music, literature, opera etc). In all the discussions about modern and contemporary stagings I always say as a kind of joke: As long as we don’t change all the manuscripts, librettos and scores in all the libraries, archives and theaters, anything goes in the world of staging opera. For me one can cut, change, adapt as one likes… As long as the original work of art is available for the next generations.

    Staging opera is as free as the creational arts. Any limits would create Soviet or fascist art.
    And yes, there is a comparison with painting here. Imagine telling Van Gogh he can paint whatever he wants, but he is not allowed to use the color yellow…
    That’s what Mrs. Berganza wants, and it’s silly.
    I will forgive her the (quite fascistic) remark on prisons. “Da wo man Bücher verbrennt, verbrennt man am Ende auch Menschen.”

    I will always love her anyway!

    Willem Bruls

  14. Bravo Teresina, I fully agree!!!

  15. mr bruls said: any limits would created soviet or fascist art?
    What’s wrong with that? I can name a few composers under the fascist regime and the soviet regime who created very , very impressive art, at least in the music section. Those melodya recordings are still sought after by many people !!!!

    • Willem Bruls says:

      You do realize that with your statement you agree with the brutal extermination of more than 30 million innocent human beings, artists and non-artists. And the intense suffering of millions and millions more. I am not surprised actually. Every discussion I ever had with people who are against modern stagings sooner or later turn out to be retards, lunatics or worse. You belong to the last category.

      • No I do not realize that. I was talking about art under the fascist regime in italy (which was different from the nazi regime) and art in the soviet Union. I never said i agreed with the political aspects of the regime.
        You would make a fine prosecutor mr Bruls putting words into me which i never said nor implied. Luckily we have putin and the chinese to stand up the retards, lunatics or worse, READ war mongers who want to replace the hateful regime of Assad with an even more hateful and murderous regime of the so called rebels…

  16. “Put some opera directors in prison”. Great. Even if it’s only metaphoric, this kind of totalitary way of thinking where artists should be punished for their art is frightening. This is not acceptable.

    • Willem Bruls says:

      Dear Musicasola, apparently we are the only ones who find this appalling and not acceptable. What does that say about the state of mind of those people who are against modern stagings??

  17. those staging are only possible through heavy subsidizing, cut the subsidies and the bullshit is over……coz there won’t be any public to pay for that bullshit on stage

  18. Novagerio says:

    Teresa worked with the very best such as Ponnelle. If you are fortunate enough of having had that background and think for one moment of the Bieitos, Baumgartens and Jonathan Meeses who run the daily eurotrash market for the sake of making audiences vomit, where does true artistry and integrity end then? Enough said.

    • Just for the sake of understanding:

      What is eurotrash ? How does it compare to ustrash ??? Or is there no ustrash ???

  19. What I am missing in Mrs. Berganza’s statement as well as in many comments above is TOLERANCE !!!

    Opera is NOT religion but reproductive art and therefore different viewpoints and interpretations are essential. If you don’t like a production you may boo or just don’t visit it. But demanding jail for stage directors is pure fascism… Enough said !

    • Gonout Backson says:

      Tolerance? Fascism? Not too heavy?

      Opera is, indeed, a “reproductive” art (i.e. one that demands mediation from an interpreter), but there is an enormous difference between “interpretation” (of what is actually written) and “paraphrase, adaptation, pastiche” (which means more or less vast rewriting of the original work). Mrs Berganza protests against the so-called “modern” productions, who, while being radical paraphrases, try to pass for “creative interpretations”. It’s a lie.

      • John E Niles says:

        I am reminded of Leonard Bernstein in the Conducting Classes at Tanglewood. I was never a participant but I was allowed to audit and listen and watch. One of the things he said over and over again to the participants in the class was: “Do your HOMEWORK.”
        If fear that in many cases with some of our so called “Modern” or Regie-Theatr Directors they have NOT done their homework sufficiently. If they did, I doubt they would come up with some of their ideas.
        Don’t get me wrong, I like well thought out, updated, modern productions where careful thought to EVERY detail is used.
        Now, I saw for example and EXCELLENT very modern production of Wozzeck with English National Opera just this year. Outstanding production, I thought. Well thought out and right on target. I also saw the Ring at Valencia. It was really fine!

        You can have updated, thoughtful productions of operas and we do. It is just that some directors alas go overboard in self indulgence and the results are, alas, not very good.

        My favorite of the modern updates is not, unfortunately, an opera. It is the new updated Sherlock Holmes, SHERLOCK. Here the details of Conan Doyle are present on some form in the new version. Now THAT is doing your homework, I feel.

        • Gonout Backson says:

          “NOT done their homework SUFFICIENTLY”? Someone told me recently about the living nightmare of a German opera Direktor : when he sees his stage director arriver at the first rehearsal a walkman on his ears and a “Reclam” miniature libretto in his hands. I know for a fact, that many of them come completely unprepared, not knowing the work. José Van Dam confirmed that in an interview quoted here recently.

          FYI : I absolutely share your enthusiasm for Sherlock and cannot wait for the third season. To me BC is the best Sherlock since Jeremy Brett, MF may be the most “alive” and touching Watson ever, and what AS did to Moriarty is simply a work of genius. Why? because 1. the creators honestly admit it’s a paraphrase; 2. in spite of all changes and manipulations – you know it’s Sherlock you’re watching, and you know all these guys love the character and the stories.

      • I want to point out that I am German. I was born in 1949 and thus experience the luck not having lived during the Nazi time nor afterwards in the GDR. But anyhow I am very sensitive about statements as the one from Mrs. Berganza. To my opinion one should NEVER play around with such words, it’s just too serious….

        • Gonout Backson says:

          Dear Stephan, are you sure to have read it right? Not only is the tone of Mr. Rothenberg’s post clearly facetious, but even if you take it seriously, it mentions “cretins all nationalities, ethnicities and sexual orientation”, which means exactly the opposite of what you suspect: no discrimination here.

          • Gonout Backson says:

            My mistake : in was meant to answer Stephan’s post of 8.15.

          • I am sorry, but the use of the word “cretin” for me is merely out of question, in whatever context it is used. I cannot take this as “facetious”. As said before, one should not play around with such words…

            and once more to the subject: I cannot understand why people always react so hateful if they are against “modern” stagings. I never heard this from the other side. There may be a joke and talk about the danger of getting pneumoconiosis after watching an old fashioned production but I never heard something dishonorable.

            And for sure time is always an important factor for understanding something new and unusual. Remember how Beethoven and especially Mahler themselves were opposed in their times, because they suddenly created something which did not fit into the ears of the traditional public. Or remember the “revolution” against the Centenary Ring production in 1976 when people would have liked to KILL Patrice Chereau. Now it has been accepted as one of the best productions ever on stage and has won a cult status.

            I just advocate mitigation and I hate generalization….

          • Gonout Backson says:

            “I am sorry, but the use of the word “cretin” for me is merely out of question”, in whatever context it is used. I cannot take this as “facetious”. As said before, one should not play around with such words…”

            I’m very suprised. It’s my favorite word to qualify myself.

            “I cannot understand why people always react so hateful if they are against “modern” stagings. I never heard this from the other side.”

            You’re happy, I hear it all the time. Their favorite insult is “reactionary”. This is what gives me the creeps, because people have been shot for such a sin. No one ever shot someone for being a cretin.

            “And for sure time is always an important factor for understanding something new and unusual.”

            This is one of the most frequent argument in this controverse, too bad it’s not very pertinent, and not really true. Beethoven has been opposed for five minutes. Mahler have been opposed for fifteen minutes. The Eighth, not the simplest of works, scored a triumph at the premiere and was immediately repeated elsewhere: 20 performances (according to wiki) in 3 years. Wiki again: “Mahler’s friend Guido Adler calculated that at the time of the composer’s death in 1911 there had been more than 260 performances of the symphonies in Europe, Russia and America.”

            Anyway, Beethoven and Mahler were writing their own works, not making themselves a name manipulating works of others.

            “Or remember the “revolution” against the Centenary Ring production in 1976 when people would have liked to KILL Patrice Chereau. Now it has been accepted as one of the best productions ever on stage and has won a cult status.”

            Chéreau’s Ring is a another classical example here. It happened 37 years ago. The original “scandal” survived barely one year, during the next festival (1977) the reception was already much better. By 1980 it was already a classic. But there is more: Chéreau worked with Boulez for months. He knew the work inside out and made a faithful (sometimes literal!), if very original, representation of the piece. It was different from Wieland, it LOOKED different, but it was coherent, true to the drama, the libretto and the score. It’s not what one would say of Mr Castorp’s Ring.

          • “Beethoven has been opposed for five minutes. Mahler have been opposed for fifteen minutes.”

            Did you measure the time with your stop watch??? I think that Mahler had much longer opposition than 15 minutes. And the Eigth symphony was mostly acclaimed for because of the mere impact of force and the cost of human resources at the premiere. Nowadays the majority (including me) keeps certain distance to this symphony and values other works much higher.

            “Chéreau worked with Boulez for months. He knew the work inside out and made a faithful (sometimes literal!), if very original, representation of the piece. It was different from Wieland, it LOOKED different, but it was coherent, true to the drama, the libretto and the score. It’s not what one would say of Mr Castorp’s Ring.”

            I fully agree with you and I also doubt that Castorf’s ring (not Castorp’s – that’s the young man in Thomas Mann’s “Magic Mountain” !!) is a masterpiece.

            What me makes wonder is that you answered all my statements except the last one:

            “I just advocate mitigation and I hate generalization….”

            How about a comment ???

            By the way, talking of Thomas Mann: He was forced to exile through the publication of that absurd “Protest der Wagnerstadt München”, initiated by Knappertsbusch, Strauss, Pfitzner and other reactionary people (no Nazi members !!!!). They claimed that TM had besmirched the “great master”, although it was just a non pathetic modern point of view (of that time)…

          • Gonout Backson says:

            Well observed : I just wanted to signal, through this kind of subliminal message disguised as a typo, that I’m a well-read man.

            But you’re right, of course: it’s much too much honour to Mr CastorF.

            Otherwise, the Modigliani inspired story of the obscure genius in the attic, dying under a leaking roof of hunger and tuberculosis, to be discovered post mortem by posterity, is a post-romantic legend with scarcely any truth in it, and a priceless alibi for every Hochstapler born ever since. Many among the persecuted artists you so selflessly advocate eat well, sleep in comfortable beds, have social security – and laugh us in the face, just as Mr CastorF did in Bayreuth.

            ““I just advocate mitigation and I hate generalization….” How about a comment ???”

            How could I comment that? It’s not an argument, but a general statement that doesn’t call for any comment. Either I believe you, and say “Good for you, congratulations”, or I don’t, and I say “No, you don’t, you’re lying”. Both would be absurd and useless.

        • Gonout Backson says:

          Since you mention your personal experience, let me say that I have exactly your age, but have lived in a regime where very ugly things were happening on a daily basis. And, still, when a exceptional artist with some temperament says something everyone has said lightly at least once in a lifetime (“this baker should be put in jail…”), without ever meaning it literally, I don’t shudder. Take it easy.

          • Willem Bruls says:

            Mahler edited and re-orchestrated entire Beethoven symphonies, adapted operas at the Vienna Opera, and made extremely modern stagings with designer Alfred Roller, all to let them sound more modern and look more contemporary. The anti-semitc, bigoted and conservative Viennese audience threw him out of the house. Somewhere in the course of pre war Europe artistic freedom became limited by old fashioned opinions and bigotry. Later they were put in prison, as Mrs Berganza would like to happen again, and gassed. What happens in modern opera stagings now is merely reconquering the freedom that has been part of opera until the 20th century…

          • Gonout Backson says:

            You do realize, I presume, that you have just compared Teresa Berganza to Stalin and Hitler?

            If that’s what it takes to defend the Regietheater…

  20. Gonout Backson says:

    It’s fantastic : each and every time someone touches this subject, we get, from the “modern” side, an avalanche of old and worn arguments, that had been refuted a hundred times.

    If you don’t want rats in Lohengrin (Neuenfels), you want gilded Zeffirelli.
    If you don’t want a typewriter on “Canzonetta sull’aria” (Marthaler), you want old Bolshoi productions.
    If you don’t want Osmin pissing in a jar (Bieito, serious case of wee-wee and poo-poo obsession), you want go back to the times “where walls waived in the wind, all furniture was red velvet, acting was unknown, wigs moved during a performance and, whenever an aria occurred, the action stopped and the singer came to the edge of the proscenium”.

    No, Mr Frank (thanks for insulting one of the great artists of our time, gives you credibility), no one asks for productions “faithful to the epoch” – only “faithful to the work’s letter and spirit”, something that can be done in many diferent ways.

    Absolutely, Mr Bruls, “one object of art is very different from the reproductive and recreational arts (music, literature, opera etc). For me one can cut, change, adapt as one likes… As long as the original work of art is available for the next generations.” Just one question: would you say the same if a conductor announced “Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony”, took the money, and then played it backwards? Or does a stage director, in your opinion, deserve a special treatment and exceptional privileges?

    “What does that say about the state of mind of those people who are against modern stagings??”. Dear Mr Bruls, for me it means that they can tell a joke when they see one. Because, Dear Musicasola, Dear Mr Bruls, please: Teresa Berganza “totalitarian”? preaching “Soviet or fascist art”? Teresa Berganza in khakis arresting Calixto Bieito? Maybe you should change your theatrical diet, because this reeks of Regietheater.

    P.S. Dear Fred, if I understand you well, before taking down a tyrant, we should first find an oppositional force of flawless democratic and moral credentials?

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  22. Sanford Rothenberg says:

    WANTED-Stage Directors/Operatic Productions.Prerequisites include musical illiteracy,ignorance of operatic tradition,and absolute contempt of audiences.Never having seen or heard an opera is a plus,as is having a “concept” diametrically opposed to the stated wishes of the composers and librettists.Preference given to graduates of the Peter Gelb Institute of Misguided Productions.Equal opportunity employer.Hopelessly unqualified cretins of all nationalities,ethnicities,and sexual orientations are encouraged to apply.

    • I wonder how this stupid and discriminating comment could be published here. So you think of people as cretins, especially when having special sexual orientations or stemming from other ethnicities. This is just a revilement from the bottom of the deck.

    • harold braun says:

      Bravo!Mr.Rothenberg!I Those productions are very often nothing more than a lame excuse for people who are at a loss to do things properly but neverthelees want to make headlines in papers run by people who are musical illiterates as well.There are some brillant exceptions like Stefan Herheim,Achim Freyer or some great choreographers who did very fine opera productions,like Mark Morris or Christian Spuck.But,overall,far too many charlatans at work.

      • Sanford Rothenberg says:

        You are clearly someone of intellect and discernment.Thank you for your rousing endorsement.This tongue-in-cheek “want ad” has appeared on several websites,and has been viewed by Lorin Maazel during his crusade against bad directors.Perhaps the general dissatisfaction among performers and audiences will lead to more “traditional” productions.

  23. Instead of adding red and or bright yellow to the Tintoretto:

    hang it askew in a neon frame on a mirrored wall
    flank it with motorized oil derrick parts
    build a five foot high wall in front of it
    have the guards wear suits of armor and carry halberds
    light it using moving patterns of red and yellow stripes
    and don’t forget the fog machines

  24. Monica Rivers says:

    So Berganza is saying that anyone who does not subscribe to her religious beliefs should be imprisoned? Now that’s what I call Spanish!

    • Gonout Backson says:

      After Berganza=Stalin and Berganza= Hitler, now we have Berganza=Torquemada.

      It’s getting better all the time.

  25. Gonout Backson says:

    No need for you to speak in the name of Europe. “Brulsian perspective” might be sufficiently scary for Lorin Maazel.

  26. She’s still a lovely lady!!!

  27. brava signora Berganza!!!i totally agree with you!!You are ABSOLUTELY RIGHT!!!All those shicky mickey artsy fartsys got it all wrong….and they know it!!!They’ll just never admit it!!big hug,polly.

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