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Dreadful news: Concertmasters executed in North Korea

Reports in South Korean media say that a dozen well-known musicians were executed in the North on August 20, supposedly for possessing pornography. Among them was an ex-girlfriend of the country’s leader, Kim Jong-un, and two concertmasters of the Unhasu Orchestra.They were named as Moon, Gyeong-Jin, Jung, Sun-Young.

Moon took part last year in a peace performance at the Salle Pleyel in Paris conducted by Myung Whun Chung. He was the country’s foremost violinist.

Please let us know if you can confirm these horrendous reports.

And can we make our voices heard? Call a Senator. Do something.

 

chung

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Comments

  1. Mark Stratford says:

    According to this report, all families have been sent to prison camps :

    http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2013/08/29/2013082901412.html

    • Dee mulford says:

      This is exactly how it was in Germany 1938. Citizens ignored what was starting up, then when it was too late, accepted what their new leadership dictated because, it was impolite to question authority.

      • That an incredibly gross oversimplification of both events. Both countries went through radical periods of change brought on by horrible economies, incredible debt, etc., in times when other countries were just getting over huge political and economical restructures (Spain, Russia, England (to a lesser extent), anyone?) Nobody had any real solutions in these countries, so the most radical parties with the biggest promises got the desperate support of the people. And if you didn’t support them, you disappeared, as this article talks about. Impolite? How incredibly ignorant of you. If you try to escape from North Korea, and if you actually make it out, the family you left behind disappears. And how many Germans fled Germany and/or tried to assassinate Hitler? Sure, the people have a responsibility to the government that controls them. But when that government has the support of the military, the police, the loudest citizens… nobody just “ignored” what happened in these countries. The people have power in countries like the US. The people had no real power in Germany post-World War I and the people of North Korea can barely get enough food to eat, much less acquire the resources to rise up against the government. The people in this article were courageous and deserve to be honored and remembered, but they got what happens to people who are courageous in North Korea. Unfortunately, that’s the unbelievable reality of North Korea. The people are kept down so thoroughly so that they simply cannot rise up and the only way to change that is with a foreign invasion and China wouldn’t allow South Korea, the US, or Japan to make that happen.

        My God, go read a book.

      • Harry Sihan says:

        North Korea cannot be compared to the rise of the nazi’s. Hitler was elected and the German people as a whole supported him. In North Korea – and until recently in South Korea as well – the population never had a say. Korea has been the victim of power games between major powers resulting in the present situation. First it was thrown to the wolves. The allies (read the US) decided that the Soviet Union could have it after the war and then, under influence of the developing cold war and communist phobia, the decision was partly reversed. An elected and widely supported governing body in the south was summarily dismissed by the US and those who collaborated with the Japanese were put back in power. Any dissent was ruthlessly put down. The north was, as agreed, occupied by the Soviets facilitating the rise of the present Kim dynasty. A brutal civil war followed. A war in which there were no good and bad guys. Although the north attacked first, Bruce Cumings convincingly showed that the south also played a part in causing this war.

        As long as it is to the advantage of China the regime in the north continues to exist. Any attempt to end it will lead to a confrontation with China and perhaps another major war. No one is willing to risk that

  2. Basia Jaworski says:
    • “They were accused of videotaping themselves having sex and selling the videos. The tapes have apparently gone on sale in China as well.”

      Could this possibly be true? If yes, why would they do that? Because they needed the money? Or is it some kind of false accusation because someone wanted them out of the way? As usual, nothing is known for certain when it comes to North Korea.

  3. I agree we should “do something.” But we should do something because of the last 50+ years, not just because these people are musicians. Small point, but an important one.

    Self-directed research is a great place to start, since most people don’t have the slightest idea about N Korea. The consensus is that “those people are crazy” for “letting themselves be ruled by idiots”.

    This is a good book, The Two Koreas, by Don Oberdorfer:
    http://www.amazon.com/The-Two-Koreas-Revised-Contemporary/dp/0465051626/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1377784857&sr=8-1&keywords=oberdorfer+korea

    • i urge you to read work of Bruce Cumings, the Chair of the History Department at the University of Chicago, and also listen to his lectures moderated by the Dean of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst Law School that are on Youtube. He is the premier expert on Korean and Korean War History. You might start with
      “The Korean War: A History”. (See: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=bruce+cumings for a list of some his books.)

      The facts in the article are so horrendous that it is critical that they be independently confirmed with solid sources before arriving at a conclusion. The article may be true, but we have been inundated so often with so much fabricated and/or unsubstantiated information to serve political agendas (e.g., to invade iraq, attack Libya and now Syria) that we must get it right to avoid doing wrong.

  4. Theodore McGuiver says:

    I’ve just received confirmation from a friend that he knew one of the executed.

  5. William Barnewitz says:

    Please tell me that the horrible nature of this story is not coming to our attention because of artists being executed. What is horrible is that executions like this take place daily. Take the time to call your Senator when this happens to anybody. Being an artist does not make you special, being a human being does.

    • Agree. But, as artists, we are moved by the fate of our own.

    • Casey Grimm says:

      William, you’re right that every one of these atrocities is one too many. In this case, the professional connection between the victims might be just as relevant as the political cesspit that produced this horrific event.

      According to the Chosun Ilbo, the victims were accused of producing pornography. In the 16 hours since this was first reported, not a single frame of this sex video has emerged online, despite the claim that it had gone on sale in China. China is not exactly a beacon of intellectual property protection, so if it had been sold anywhere in that country, I would expect bootlegged copies in every dark crevice of the internet.

      One of the victims, Hyon Song-wol, was romantically involved with Kim Jong Un before his father, Kim Jong Il, forced him to stop the relationship, and she went on to marry a soldier. Lithianian news agency balsas.lt reported that he has been seen in public with Hyon since her marriage, fuelling rumors that their affair had continued.

      Taken as a whole, these rumors and circumstantial hints combine to form as clear a picture as can emerge from North Korea’s black hole of public information: Kim Jong Un sensed a threat to his public pretense of unimpeachable respectability, and eliminated that threat in a way that he hoped would draw attention away from his former mistress. If this is true, then the other eleven victims were chosen specifically for their close professional connection to Hyon.

      Thus, while virtually no conclusive evidence has emerged one way or the other, it is plausible that those eleven people were executed, and their families forever imprisoned, simply because they were musicians.

  6. Given that the New York Philharmonic appeared there a couple of years ago -
    is there any reaction from them?

    (http://www.amazon.com/The-Pyongyang-Concert-Philharmonic-Maazel/dp/B001DELX1W/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1377790506&sr=8-2&keywords=maazel+new+york+philharmonic+north+korea)

  7. Theodore McGuiver says:

    A good friend of mine, Christophe Talmont, has sent me the following message. I’ve decided not to translate it into English as I feel that would betray a good deal of what he’s feeling at the moment:

    “Cette annonce me glace et me laisse sans voix….car je suis un des très rares Chefs d’orchestre occidentaux à avoir diriger cet orchestre UNHASU, à deux reprises et à Pyong Yang! Mun Kyong Jin, le konzertmeister, ancien élève du prestigieux conservatoire de Moscou avait un talent fou et s’est comporté avec moi d’une manière exceptionnelle, presque tendre et ce, en dépit de nos problèmes de communication linguistique! Je garde un souvenir de ces deux séjours d’une émotion inqualifiable, car nullement dupe de la manipulation à laquelle je participais sciemment. Malgré les problèmes de traduction ( non littérale loin s’en faut…) et du contexte totalement surréaliste de l’ aventure, j’ai eu une relation extraordinaire avec cet orchestre, me sentant, ô comble du paradoxe, entièrement libre!

    Mais la Musique reste un art décidément bien complexe, qui nous force, en tant qu’artiste, à réflechir pour ne rester jamais naif…Bien qu’elle soit cette langue merveilleuse et universelle qui permet de partager entre tous nos Frères et soeurs de la planète des émotions d’une indicible profondeur, révélant ainsi l’incommensurable richesse humaine, elle est aussi cette arme incroyablement perverse que se plaisent à entretenir d’infâmes dictateurs, manipulant grâce à ce délicieux poison invisible les abymes de nos consciences…..”

  8. Christophe Talmont, Chef d'orchestre, Conductor. says:

    Cette annonce me glace et me laisse sans voix….car je suis un des très rares Chefs d’orchestre occidentaux à avoir diriger cet orchestre UNHASU, à deux reprises et à Pyong Yang! Mun Kyong Jin, le konzertmeister, ancien élève du prestigieux conservatoire de Moscou avait un talent fou et s’est comporté avec moi d’une manière exceptionnelle, presque tendre et ce, en dépit de nos problèmes de communication linguistique! Je garde un souvenir de ces deux séjours d’une émotion inqualifiable, car nullement dupe de la manipulation à laquelle je participais sciemment. Malgré les problèmes de traduction ( non littérale loin s’en faut…) et du contexte totalement surréaliste de l’ aventure, j’ai eu une relation extraordinaire avec cet orchestre, me sentant, ô comble du paradoxe, entièrement libre!

    Mais la Musique reste un art décidément bien complexe, qui nous force, en tant qu’artiste, à réflechir pour ne rester jamais naif…Bien qu’elle soit cette langue merveilleuse et universelle qui permet de partager entre tous nos Frères et Soeurs de la planète des émotions d’une indicible profondeur, révélant ainsi l’incommensurable richesse humaine, elle est aussi cette arme incroyablement perverse que se plaisent à entretenir d’infâmes dictateurs, manipulant grâce à ce délicieux poison invisible les abymes de nos consciences…..”

    • Modified Google translation:
      This announcement and leaves me frozen speechless …. for I am one of the Western conductors to have directed the orchestra Unhasu, twice and Pyongyang! Mun Kyong Jin, the concertmaster, a former student of the prestigious Moscow Conservatory had an incredible talent and behaved with me in a unique way, almost tender, despite our linguistic communication problems! I keep a memory of these two stays of unspeakable emotion. Despite the problems of translation (not literal … far from it) and totally surreal context of the adventure, I had a special relationship with this orchestra, it felt completely free.
      But the music is decidedly a complex art, which forces us, as artists, never to remain naive … Although this wonderful and universal language that can be shared between all our Brothers and Sisters of planet of the emotions of unspeakable depth, revealing the immeasurable human wealth, it is also this incredibly perverse weapon like to discuss infamous dictators, handling with this delicious invisible poison the abyss of our minds ….. “

      • Sarah Downs says:

        One phrase missing : After “Je garde un souvenir de ces deux séjours d’une émotion inqualifiable ” are the words ” car nullement dupe de la manipulation à laquelle je participais sciemment” – Google is giving me a literal translations “I keep a memory of these two stays of unspeakable emotion, because no manipulation tricks that I knowingly participated” –

        I thnk M. Talmont means that he felt neither duped nor manipulated, meaning his experience and bond with Mun Kyong Jin were authentic.

      • Christophe Talmont, Chef d'orchestre, Conductor. says:

        thanks very much for your translation…

    • Merci pour ce touchant témoignage, Monsieur Talmont. Pour ma part, je crois que nous, les musiciens, tous autant que nous sommes, et chacun selon son aptitude, avons une responsabilité d’opposer à la triste froideur de ce monde, la chaleur de nos musicales émotions, la vibration de nos instruments respectifs apportant le réconfort et le changement nécessaire à la continuation de la vie sur cette terre.

      Malheureusement, certains ne tolèrent pas cette présence musicale et artistique. Combien de nos collègues souffrent de ne pouvoir exprimer la charge qu’ils portent de par leur talent? Souvenons-nous de nos collègues nord-coréens, victimes de bourreaux intolérants à la Vie. Et mobilisons-nous pour que cette tendresse que vous avez ressentie en côtoyant ce konzertmeister devienne enfin la force prédominante de notre monde.

      Bonne continuation.
      Mes plus profondes sympathies.
      Lucie, au Québec.

  9. I’ve never heard of such a thing sibce the days of Soviet repression. I simply assumed we were beyond this. What a fool I am. And how terrible is this.

    • “Soviet repression”? I don’t know what you are refering to but if it is to do with USSR as far as I know even a single executions never was carried out on famous musisians on such a short notice, let alone the group ones. This does sound like a medieval news. I’m horrified.

      • Stalin destroyed thousands and thousands of the greatest people. Musicians, artists, scientists, actors etc etc etc… North Korea is hardly near soviet repression but they have terrible example to learn

  10. Sarah Downs says:

    I cannot speak I am so horrified. As a singer and as a human being I am appalled and devastated at this news. I mean, can’t North Koreans get a break, God? Haven’t they been through enough? Rid them of this horrible dictator and let freedom — musical, political, personal — heal our friends across the globe. I am so sad. So sad.

  11. Our impotence in the face of such events is beyond frustrating. Yet, what exactly can we do? Call our senators, protest in front of some consulate… and then what? It’s not like North Korea pays much attention to what we think or do. If anything, they use any such action on our part as fodder for their “Western aggression” propaganda.

  12. As a retired professional violinist, my heart aches along with the others’ on this blog. DO SOMETHING? DO WHAT? Since America and its allies have little to no influence on this isolated country, I doubt anything will happen in this instance.

  13. Ion Sorin says:

    But what a wonderful music, such a deep nostalgia could find only in Chinese novels and in Japanese minimal arts… It’s miracle that a country, such very much oppressed could give birth to this poetical and profound harmony. I, myself, know the terror from inside and I know what is the fear and the weakness of so-called people’s dictatorship. Without a general (I mean global) rise and a resolute stand against the establishment, forbidding them the luxury to be feared by everybody, forbidding them those shiny cars and priceless holidays in Austrian spas and ski resorts, the will live forever, they will kill forever. And I know, because we thought till the last second, that Ceausescu is immortal. The revolution must be first revolt and revulsion.

  14. Giuseppe Marotta says:

    Trovo inqualificabile , sia quanto è accaduto a questi esseri umani….nostri fratelli in musica!
    che il silenzio delle nostre Autorità …
    Non mi meraviglio che ciò accada in un paese da anni in mano a uno delle ideologie che dopo il Nazifascismo è la più grande tragedia degli ultimi secoli…
    Il reato che ha determinato questa sentenza di morte è una bazzecola in rapporto a quanto
    ci fanno ingoiare ogni giorno in merito a delitti realmente efferati che sono giustificati da una strategia del perdono come atto di crescita sociale ipocrita e pseudo buonista!

    CHIUDIAMO I RAPPORTI CON QUESTO PAESE INCIVILE!!!

  15. Theodore McGuiver says:
  16. Evil exists in the world and it will flourish as long as decent, good people remain silent and pretend not to see it. What political leader anywhere has the stones to intervene? Obama? Not likely…he doesn’t want to ruin his legacy, or what’s left of it. In the US, if you’re a politician who will take decisive action to wipe out the evil dictators you immediately are branded a war-monger imperialist pig. Just as George W Bush, Don Rumsfeld, Dick Cheney or John McCain. The few countries that try to improve conditions in the world are not supported by all. They can’t afford it either. And too many run scared of terrorists to want to chance it. So it goes. This kind of thing will continue in the dark corners of the world sorry to say.

  17. From the accounts that I’ve read, the accusation was that the accused members themselves allegedly made home-made pornography. In addition, some of them were in possession of Bibles, which may have indicated the real reason could have been dissent against the regime of Kim Jong-Un. Furthermore, it seems that there was a professional (musical) connection between Kim Jong-Un’s current wife and one of the executed women, leaving a question of personal motives.

    I watched a couple youtube videos, and the music seemed reminiscent of the mid-20th century in the US, and overtly patriotic. The state of the arts in N. Korea thus seems to be quite regulated, as in Nazi Germany of the pre- and WWII era.

    These sorts of exectutions, as well as torture, are happening in N. Korea daily, regardless of occupation, and they do need to be stopped.

    • Luanne Ashe says:

      Exactly “whom” do you believe the “interventionist” ought to be? And what method do you propose to employ? It seems to me that the U.S. tried to intervene a generation or two ago, and what was the result? Think this through for us all.

      • Luanne Ashe says:

        I meant to add, “Upon what moral ground or standard do you propose said ‘intervention’?”

    • Bibles and pornography – a perverse, unlikely mix except if you happen to live in a la la workers’ paradise.
      I vote for the first being the real reason and also certain people having been corrupted by being out of the country, which is rare in itself. From the LA article:
      “Mun won first place in an international competition in Hungary in 2005.”
      This is clearly a message for anyone in DPRK to lay off anything Western, be it ideas, music or religion.
      I wonder what those hypocrites in the commie party over there do for recreation.
      Kim Jong Un apparently likes Western films…

    • I Agree with you Jesse, public execution without a fair trial goes against the majority of the civilized culture. What really bugs me in particular about this is that it demonstrates Kim jong inability to rule from a fair and personally detached manner. According to other sources on this mattter, Pornograhic offenses do not typical carry public executions with them, the only crimes that carry such punishments are political crimes such sedition or treason. since there was no evidence confirming such actions from the victims and where sentence only on the creation of pornography with the dictators ex girlfriend, the obvious conclusion is that he sentenced them to a political execution because he felt personally offended by it and not by what the law says. The reason this bugs me is that you have a tyrannical dictator who cant rule without using his personal feeling(or in a level headed manner for short) who owns nuclear warheads and is at work developing inter continental ranged missiles for those warheads.

      • Public execution of Fugu-face’s former girlfriend smacks of pathological projection. The Jerk- in-Charge didn’t know what to do with his own lack of blameless example which in a dictatorship often swings between severe puritanism and licentiousness. So what better way to discharge his psychological tension then to make her the scapegoat and in the process get rid of a few others?
        This act, unfortunately shows how SICK and dangerous this character is. He has been living in a bubble of his own self-importance and spoiled to the hilt. He, perhaps, should be feared more than the current Iranian leaders. He is a nuclear disaster waiting to happen.
        There are more similarities than differences in totalitarian dictatorships. They can only rely on brute force to sustain themselves.

  18. Given that on this homepage many commentators regularly chastise individuals and groups for not having done enough to resist barbarism in the late 1930s and 1940s, what is their reaction to an individual and a group playing the well-fed fools for an unspeakable tyrrany:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kP16fzM2_zs

    Mister Osborne – are you there?

    • We condemned this folly from the moment it was announced. Today, we asked Lorin Maazel for a reaction to the executions. Still waiting.

    • Of course we should do “something” about this North Korean situation, but shouldn’t we not all be more worried about the rising cost of Aleppo soaps and end the Syrian war first?

      What I’m trying to show with this question is how little we are affected by what is going on in North Korea, as they don’t even supply great soap. And this lack of economical connection, in addition to them having their own problems, is the main reason why John and Jane Doe don’t care or don’t have time to deal with what is happening in North Korea.

  19. Dennis Malfatti says:

    While this is indeed shocking and disturbing news, I take issue with the final line of this report: “And can we make our voices heard? Call a Senator. Do something.” While there is no doubt that, if true, the incident is extraordinarily horrific, the last line of the post suggests one of two things: 1) A lack of knowledge that this kind of thing has happened and likely continues to happen to countless ordinary citizens in North Korea all the time or 2) A lack of sensitivity to that fact, implying that because they are musicians, it’s somehow worse. Why should we wait until musicians are executed before we “make our voices heard” or “call a senator?” As a classical musician myself, I have often been annoyed by the way musicians appear to know about the world only via the music world. Now we can only feel empathy and compassion and be moved to fight for social justice and human rights when it happens to one of us? Any informed person should know about the horrors of North Korea. If we want to be true agents of social just and human rights, we should have “made our voices heard” and “done something” a long time ago. Otherwise, simply share the news, but cut the delusion of heroics for having done so.

  20. Greg Hlatky says:

    Then again, there’s good reason to regard stories coming from North Korea with a measure of skepticism: http://www.businessinsider.com/did-kim-jong-un-execute-his-ex-girlfriend-2013-8

  21. Where did you find the list of names of the executed?

  22. The first duty we have is what Norman is doing – making sure that the truth is recorded and published. But what then? Of course our elected leaders know how horrific things are in North Korea, which has actual nuclear weapons, has tested them in violation of international rules, and has repeatedly threatened to rain them upon the US. They know of North Korea’s literally underground slave-labor camps. What exactly are they to do? What carrots or sticks do they have to change the behavior of this regime? If a regime does not want anything the West could offer (e.g. trade or capital) or fear any sanctions (e.g. being bombed to smithereens), then the West has no leverage. Second, a small point that must be commented on: yes, Stalin killed his own citizens, by the millions, and musicians lived in terror of becoming the next random target of his psychopathy. He is the closest analogy for Dear Leader and North Korea’s militarist/ totalitarian/ terror autocracy, in that one could be disappeared for no reason at all, just the leader’s whim.

  23. Luanne Ashe says:

    What makes us believe the North Korean regime cares a RODENT’S RECTUM about what the rest of us think about Social Justice or any other matter. If people would STOP applying Arrogant Liberal Western worldviews on the situation, there might actually be some progress made.

    North Korea has been a tyrannical dictatorship for longer than most of us have been breathing. The son is worse than the father, and his people are starved and terrorized into his worship. Children there inform on parents for a bowl of rice and vice versa. You think it is a nice, and civilized place to be? Think again.

    I read “Escape from Camp 14″ last summer, and extrapolated a horrible truth the Main Stream Media will not touch.

    http://www.ebook3000.com/Biographies/Escape-from-Camp-14–One-Man-s-Remarkable-Odyssey-from-North-Korea-to-Freedom-in-the-West_160850.html

  24. Mark Stratford says:

    By all accounts the Pyongyang concerts by Maazel and NYPO were only for dignitaries and the purple prose reports were totally overblown. Seems it was the first time that part of the city had had consistent electricity for several weeks. All in all a bit of a publicity stunt.

  25. Riber Dominique says:

    This is just unacceptable and horrible ! Internationaly it cannot be allowed ! Something needs to be done to stop such a dictator or have him respected the Human rIghts !

    • 1st you need to verfiy, if the story is even true. As Eddie McGuire has pointed out below.

      I’m unsure if Kim-boy’s regime is any worse than other regimes who are untouched elsewhere. We know (or could if we’d want to know) some super democratic “Western” governments who are responsible for many deaths among their own folk, so we shouldn’t point the finger at others without having proof.

  26. Before believing such reports we should ask if they are part of the ongoing dis-information campaign aimed at DPRK (‘North Korea’). Despite the Syria crisis, the main thrust of US foreign policy remains the ‘pivot to Asia’ which could include a war with DPRK. False stories are part of winning public support in the West for such a scenario. It is worth considering such comments as those by Adam Taylor at http://www.businessinsider.comhttp://www.businessinsider.com/did-kim-jong-un-execute-his-ex-girlfriend-2013-8

  27. Raymond Hope says:

    Being in the music profession I am especially saddened at this alleged atrocity to members of ‘our family’. A desk colleague suggested that perhaps for a week (or whatever period of time is agreed as deemed appropriate), that every orchestra worldwide play a short passage of a fitting North Korean folk song that expresses the sentiments of this terrible event (after it has been establishes as being true) before every performance. And this tribute being repeated thereafter for a week or whatever at every anniversary marking this event. But I do agree with those that say we have to beware of any disinformation smear campaigns against the North. We must first of all establish that this has in fact happened.

  28. Eddie: Very sensible comments. The articles you cite are very helpful, especially the second one in which a number of journalists are quoted as calling into question the unconfirmed Chosun Ilbo report. Best to wait for confirmation before finalizing one’s judgment.

  29. Who needs confirmation?

    The atrocities of the North Korean regime have been well documented by the accounts of the lucky few who have escaped from the country’s notorious labour camps, as horrific as any dreamt up by Stalin. The Committee for Human Rights in NK (http://www.hrnk.org) has undertaken the research and publication of much of these, including “The Hidden Gulag” by David Hawk, a dispassionate and meticulous analysis. Arbitrary executions, lifetime incarcerations of generations of entire families of “undesirables”, forced miscarriages, infanticide – alongside this, the execution of a handful of musicians is, sadly, a sideshow.

    It is shocking that our press devotes so little space to NK, so much so that most people (including some of the contributors to this thread) seem to have little or no idea of the crimes against humanity that the regime have been perpetrating there for over half a century. Please, if you don’t already know, learn about it (read “Escape from Camp 14″ if you can bear) and spread the word.

  30. Alejandro Cao de Benós said that the news were false and the orchestra will perform on September 9, 2013. But untill now, there is no report about the so-called September 9, 2013 performance on North Korean websites. If this disater is true, I think, we, the people live in this world, really should do something for these North Korean musicians.

  31. I thought it was a false news, but now, I more and more tend to believe that it is a real disaster.
    Let’s have a look what Kim Jong Un said on September 1, 2013 ( KCNA news):

    Pyongyang, September 1 (KCNA) — Kim Jong Un, first secretary of the Workers’ Party of Korea, first chairman of the National Defence Commission of the DPRK and supreme commander of the Korean People’s Army, enjoyed together with Ri Sol Ju a performance “My Motherland of Songun” given by the Korean People’s Internal Security Forces (KPISF) Song and Dance Ensemble.
    … … … …

    Kim Jong Un congratulated the performers on their successful performance.
    He expressed great satisfaction over the fact that the artistes presented a splendid performance peculiar to their organization.

    He said that ideological education should not be stopped even a moment at present when the imperialists’ ideological and cultural poisoning is getting evermore frantic, adding that it is impossible to defend socialism when a concession is made in ideology.

    He said that watching the performance, he heard not mere songs reflecting the pledges of the artistes of the Ensemble but the true voices representing the resolution of the servicepersons of the KPISF to defend the socialist system by tightly holding the swords of the revolution. He also said the performance greatly encouraged him.

    He assigned the Ensemble a task to prepare well a performance celebrating the 65th anniversary of the DPRK.

    _______________________________________

    “He said that ideological education should not be stopped even a moment at present when the imperialists’ ideological and cultural poisoning is getting evermore frantic, adding that it is impossible to defend socialism when a concession is made in ideology.”

    I grew up in an Asian country. At that sensitive moment he said this, I am sure: this is very important sentense. It gave a lots of information… …

    The Unhasu Orchestra did not appear on 09.09, North Korean National Day. The Korean People’s Internal Security Forces (KPISF) Song and Dance Ensemble replaced them.

    I more and more tend to believe the tragedy really happened.
    I do not know the reason, maybe some musicians have different opinion with Kim Jong Un about how to make performances, because in May, he suggested (or ordered) Unhasu Orchestra to cooperate with a Pop music group of North Korean in July, but Unhasu Orchestra didn’t do according to what he suggested; Or, maybe just because some musicians can not bear to waste their lives and their talent in North Korean anymore and want to leave.
    I do not know the reason, but I really have very sad and bad feeling about this now.

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