an blog | AJBlog Central | Contact me | Advertise | Follow me:

Opera Australia slashes more singers

We’ve received this message from a principal artist at OA, one of many whose livelihood is threatened by the incursion of commercial musicals. The informant has requested anonymity.

Opera Australia has reneged on its policy, for 2014 only so far, of no 52 week contracts for the majority of ensemble principal artists who had a reasonable expectation of receiving one. This information comes from today’s meeting of Opera Australia management and Union officials. The company has committed to just sixteen 52 week contracts for 2014. The next step is to secure the future of the ensemble. The principal artists are grateful for the support of all those who have rallied behind them.

The future for singers in the Lucky Country is looking very dry.

opera australia

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Comments

  1. Hang on – this sounds like good news. Well, moderately good.

    Your correspondent says that OA has reneged on the policy of no 52-week contracts and has decided to issue 16 of them. One may not think it enough, but zero contracts to 16 contracts is at least a move in the right direction, no?

    Did I miss something?

  2. Theodore McGuiver says:

    “Opera Australia has reneged on its policy, for 2014 only so far, of no 52 week contracts for the majority of ensemble principal artists who had a reasonable expectation of receiving one.”

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but surely that means the majority of ensemble principals will, in fact, be receiving 52-week contracts.

  3. With only sixteen fulltime jobs in the industry for soloists, remind me again how many young singers our tertiary institutions are turning out a year?

    It is time we looked at the ethics of allowing so many young people to studying solo singing.

    • Ethics of allowing people to study singing? How ridiculous. Just because not everyone will have a future in professional performance doesn’t mean the skills are useless in other contexts. Not to mention that in a free society we should be able to pursue education for education’s sake.

    • Jenny, I could say that the singers who were really serious about pursuing a singing career generally leave the “lucky country” to do it elsewhere, but I won’t, for fear of the storms of protest that will probably ensue.

      • Theodore McGuiver says:

        Not from me or from many others, I’d imagine. Lucky and few are those who are able to earn a living exclusively in their home countries. Training is training. If it were a matter of direct relevance we’d be better off closing down sociology departments than music colleges.

        • O Theodor, welch eine Wendung!
          After reading here what the OA singers have to put up with, do you really think that they consider themselves “lucky”?

    • Jenny, I think a society tried that, it was called the Soviet Union. Not all students go to music school just for the gig.

      • Theodore McGuiver says:

        The Soviet arts system was fabulous. Apart from anything else, the ambient cultural education music students received was phenomenal.

  4. ILoveOpera says:

    Did Dr John O’Brien get an answer to his very pertinent letter to OA (reprinted on your blog on 14 May in ‘Opera Australia adds smugness to injury)’?

an ArtsJournal blog