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Oh, no! Now Lords bans classical trumpet

England narrowly won the First Test against Australia despite the absence of their greatest cheerleader, Billy The Trumpet Cooper. Bill, an orchestra pro, was banned by the ground authorities in Nottingham, on some petty by-law. Today, Lords – the headquarters of cricket – announced that it will permit no music at all in the Second Test, starting Thursday, except for the two national anthems at start of play.

How do they expect cricketers and fans to get in the groove without music to cheer them on? I might have to sing very loudly as I pass the ground, two or three times a day. Oy, Lords! You have been warned.
billy cooper

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Comments

  1. It’s very sad – one of the great things about cricket in the Caribbean for example is the music you get in the crowd. It adds atmosphere and far from distracting the players, probably inspires and encorages them. Shame on Lords and Trent Bridge.

  2. John Summers says:

    Don’t think he’s ever ben allowed to play at Lords Norman – and as his uncle I should know!

    • Tim Walton says:

      You are correct.

      Music has never been allowed at Lord’s. Perhaps to avoid waking up the geriatric old farts (excuse the French) asleep in the Long Room.

    • People are there to have a laugh with thier friends and family. The Barmy Army is something that wants to be heard and watched. It’s very boring now. Let people enjoy the day without the constant, monotonous, boring chanting and noise from a select few that nobody cares about anymore! I pass this message on from a load of cricket fans who thought Trent Bridge was a whole lot better without the LOOK AT ME idiots!

  3. Michael says:

    As a passionate lover of both classical music and cricket, I feel it is a great shame that those who tolerate a virtual free-for-all of music at cricket matches (whether a solo trumpet or group of instruments, drums, not to mention the dreaded vuvuzela (see http://www.aolnews.com/2010/06/15/how-loud-are-those-world-cup-vuvuzela-horns/ for information on the damaging sound levels)), obviously have no idea how incredibly frustrating and annoying it is to have to sit in front of or even close to someone selfishly creating this level of noise throughout a playing day of seven-and-a-half hours.

    The Ashes Tests are sold out, so spectators do not have the option to move elsewhere in the ground. NL may feel “Billy is a popular figure at England matches”, but not with anyone sitting close to him.

  4. I’d rather listen to Billy playing his trumpet than the mindless junk many cricket (and rugby) venues play through their loudspeaker systems when there is the slightest pause in the games. It’s as though they think nobody can tolerate a moment’s silence! As for the vuvuzelas blown during the Football World Cup in South Africa – definitely not!!

  5. Will Duffay says:

    The bit I could do without is the naff and over-loud rendition of Jerusalem before each day’s play. When did we become such a vulgar nationalistic country that we feel it necessary to yell like a drunken footballer before a day’s Ashes cricket?

  6. Minnesota Orchestra principal Manny Laureano got his trumpet confiscated at a Twin’s game 25 years ago but it got so much press coverage the team ended up having a game in his honor.:http://www.csmonitor.com/1983/0804/080446.html/(page)/2

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