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Now they’re saying Kafka was gay…. among other weekend thoughts

1 First Stravinsky, now Kafka? Click here.

2 When Beethoven met Goethe, 201 years ago today, it was not like when Harry met Sally. Click here (auf Deutsch).

beethoven and goethe - carl roehling

3 Fifty years ago…

4 How to make a musical cup of tea

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Comments

  1. Franz Kafka felt persecuted throughout much of his life. Is there to be no respite even after this length of time? Franz Kafka wanted his writings burned, instead they were published and much of the translation by the Muirs does incomplete justice to the original material.

    Please, let us respect the concept of R.I.P..

    • you seem to believe that suggesting Kafka may’ve had homosexual tendencies is further persecution…a sort of tarnishing of his reputation.

    • Circiter says:

      Would it feel like further prosecution to you if someone were to bring forth that he might have been left-handed?

  2. Let’s start a rumour that Oscar Wilde was straight. The man was married with two children, after all.

  3. Beethoven’s 6th Symphony. His greatest work!

  4. Bob Love says:

    After an eternity of suppressing basic information about historical figures’ sexuality, historians are rightfully exploring the formerly taboo subject of homosexuality. This is perfectly legitimate. Sadly, the “they” in your lede indicates the subject is still a bit touchy for you.

  5. R. James Tobin says:

    Milena Jesenska, journalist and girlfriend of Kafka might well have disagreed.

    • PR Deltoid says:

      Not just Milena but Dora Dymant (who he lived with in the last year of his life), and the various prostitutes and “shop girls” he consorted with.

  6. Svenski says:

    The idea that he might have been gay is no insult to his work or his reputation.

    • PR Deltoid says:

      It isn’t, but for some reason Kafka is like a Rorschach blot, he attracts all kinds of interpretations, often with the slimmest of justifications.

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