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Another Steinway is stolen

We have referred in the past to the two Steinways that were taken from London’s Royal Festival Hall – simply walked through the artists’ entrance on two separate occasions by a gang of bare-faced burglars.

Now, someone has repeated the crime at Toronto General Hospital.

The worst about it is that no-one noticed the baby grand was missing for four whole days.

steinway toronto

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Comments

  1. Cassandra Riis says:

    I thought all babies at hospitals had wrist bands to track them?? What happened?

  2. PK Miller says:

    How do you steal a piano? Would theater management not be aware of any orders to move a piano or other such instrument? Wouldn’t someone have issued a work order/contract w/a reputable piano mover? At least that’s how it’s done in the states. No one walks in and announces, “We’re here to move/take the piano!” Even in a hospital SOMEONE should have been aware. Or was this an inside job? And why does a HOSPITAL have a Steinway–baby grand or grown up?!

  3. John Sharpe says:

    The Steinway at Toronto General was played by local pianists and used as musical therapy for patient treatment.

    • I used to do that a local hospital but didn’t have as nice a piano. Everyone loved it.

  4. Naughty Nigel says:

    It’s easily done. All you need are the right clothes to appear plausible.

    Some years ago thieves wheeled all of the motorcycles away from the Honda stand at the London Motorcycle Show.

    It was the end of the show and these guys turned up wearing team jackets or whatever and just wheeled the bikes away into waiting vans. I don’t think they were ever recovered or anybody prosecuted.

    Other crimes have been committed by people wearing orange jackets or staff uniforms.

    • Stephen says:

      The appearance of normalcy, a dollop of chutzpah, a modicum of assurance, a clipboard with pen and away we go.
      If you look like you know what you’re doing, no one takes notice usually.
      Years ago, as a student, I attended a performance at Lincoln Center. From the ticket sales chart, I figured out where the conductor’s green room was, and went after the performance, walking right by many “keepers of the castle.” I know it’s a small thing- but it shows how easily things can be done when everyone is seeing normal activities.

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