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Maestro moves: Riccardo’s not going anywhere soon

Riccardo Chailly signed on today for five more years in Leipzig. The town’s not pretty but he’s got a great team.

R. Chailly, B. Jung besiegeln Vertragsverlängerung bis 2020

Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren,

 

Gewandhauskapellmeister Riccardo Chailly und Gewandhausdirektor Andreas Schulz sollen bis 2020 beim Leipziger Gewandhaus bleiben.
Details zu dieser Nachricht und Fotos finden Sie in angehängter Presseinformation.

 

Mit freundlichen Grüßen,

Dirk Steiner

 

 

 

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen

 

Riccardo Chailly will remain at the helm of the Gewandhausorchester for a further five years beyond the duration of his current contract.

 

Please find more details in the attached press release.

 

With best regards

Dirk Steiner

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Comments

  1. Riccardo, congratulations. How nice it would be for us to work together again? How about the two Brahms? If ever you have a chance of doing a Cycle, please remember that these are my best bets, these days in my mature career! I miss working with you. Since that great Prok 3 .. and or Griegs… sooo long too long ago. Un grande abbraccio, sempre C* Ortiz

  2. Alexander Hall says:

    Leipzig “not pretty”? Has Norman actually been in the centre of Leipzig with its mediaeval buildings and great sense of civic pride?

  3. Hasbeen says:

    Norman, agreed ! for a change…

  4. Frankly, the city I live in (Paris) is considered to be pretty (or whatever), but I wouldn’t mind if it was less pretty and it had an orchestra of the class of the Gewandhaus….

    • Un orchestre de la classe du Gewandhaus à Paris ! Ah bon lequel ?

      • Mathieu says:

        Aucun! C’est précisément ce que dit mon commentaire précédent. Ma dernière phrase se traduit : “ça ne me dérangerait pas que Paris soit un peu moins jolie, mais possède un orchestre de la classe du Gewandhaus….”

    • Michael Schaffer says:

      Few cities do, and I don’t think that ” ranking” orchestras makes sense to begin with, but the last time I heard the Orchestre National de France live (with ex-Gewandhaus-Kapellmeister Masur), they were pretty fabulous. Very refined sound, highly engaged playing and flexible ensemble. What more can one ask for?

      • Mathieu says:

        I quite agree with you about the ineptness of ranking orchestras. I admit that in the beginning of Masur’s tenure, the ONF has done a number of great concerts (under Masur, but also under Sir Colin Davis; I remember an astounding Romeo et Juliette under Davis). However the orchestra rapidly went back to its usual sloppiness. Do not get me wrong. They are excellent musicians, but as an orchestra, the result is very often uneven.

        My initial remark was intended to be humoristic. However I still believe there is a grain of truth in it. The French musical education is focused on training future soloists. Orchestral practice is utterly despised in French conservatoires. Then, when one purses an orchestral career, and even when one belongs to a world-class orchestra such as the ONF, there is always an aftertaste of personal faliure. No such thing of course in German schools. It explains that Germany has so many excellent orchestras, and France, well, only has orchestras with excellent musicians.

        This is a generalization of course, but I think there is some truth in it.

  5. Michael Schaffer says:

    “The French musical education is focused on training future soloists. Orchestral practice is utterly despised in French conservatoires. Then, when one purses an orchestral career, and even when one belongs to a world-class orchestra such as the ONF, there is always an aftertaste of personal faliure.”

    Really? I find that surprising because for most instruments, making a career as a soloist is hardly an option to begin with. Full time soloists of any of the wind instruments are extremely rare and the few there are typically operate from the safety of a teaching position at a music academy. And even when it comes to the more typical solo instruments like the violin or the cello, very few make it that far. Students who enter a conservatory must be aware that they are very likely to head for a job in an orchestra – if they can get one – rather than a solo career in most cases, and if someone has that potential, it is typically already evident by the time they are old enough to enter the music academy.
    I heard that the French conservatoire system is very rigid, with a catalog of pieces and studies for each year from beginner’s level on which must be strictly followed and worked through, requiring the students to learn and play these exam pieces in the prescribed order and that also makes it a little difficult for students who are a little behind the course. I knew a girl from Paris who studied the oboe in Berlin and she told me she couldn’t study at the Conservatoire because she was a year too old to be admitted at her level.

    • I agree with you, and my formulation was somewhat clumsy. When I say that “The French musical education is focused on training future soloists”, I never said it always succeeds doing so ! My point is only that when you study music at a high level in a French conservatoire, you do not really see an orchestral career as a fulfilling perspective. I do not say everybody has high hopes (there are some realistic teachers, thank God), but still: orchestral practice is not well looked on. French musicians are excellent as far as their instrumental practice is concerned (really : think of the new generation of French cellists; they are the best in the world); but they do not make for excellent orchestra players.
      Hence the spirit of “fonctionnaires” (public servants) that is common among French orchestras (due also to a range of other factors).

      PS I’m sorry, this thread and the previous ones are a tad off-topic!

      • Thomas P says:

        Don’t apologize. Your comments were most thought provoking and rendered the topic as secondary fluff.

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