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Video: playing my cello on American Airlines at 39,000 feet

After all the horror stories about airlines and precious musical instruments, here’s one happy cellist, Ian Maksin, who got asked by the flight crew to play for them in mid-air between Chicago and Fort Lauderdale. Looks like it earned him an upgrade.

ian maskin

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Comments

  1. Thanks to Ian for playing for the crew. Perhaps this gesture will count towards reducing the latent hostility that airlines have for musicians and their instruments. Imagine a world of people who liked and respected musicians to the degree that they would be allowed flexibility for their precious and expensive instruments.

    • I could not agree more with you Andy! With all the uncertainty and dangers of traveling by air with the cello, I must take my hat down for the Chicago based American Airlines ground personnel and flight crews who have been nothing but supportive throughout the years, and I fly a lot!! I usually end up inviting all of them to my performances and there are probably several dozen American employees who have been coming regularly to my concerts in Chicago…. I know it doesn’t resolve the instrument issue, but hopefully it is just one step towards the long-sought-after resolution of the cello on the plane issue!

  2. I travelled United Airlines to the US from India and back, and within the US too. One of our group was actually reading the book “United breaks guitars” on the flight in!

    I have to say that my violin was very well looked after by the crew. They took great trouble to find an overhead locker that it would fit in, and made small talk with me about the instrument, how long I’d been playing, etc. Maybe they had been primed to be nice to musicians, or maybe they were just being nice. But no complaints.

    They must have guessed I wasn’t that good though. No requests for me to play, even though it was a long flight back to India!

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