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‘I dropped my flute and rushed the guy’

Church musician Gerald Madrid is the toast of New Mexico today after stopping a knife attack towards the end of the service in Albuquerque Westside church by pinioning the assailant with his body. Mr Madrid suffered five stab wounds.

‘I instinctively just dropped my flute and I rushed the guy,’ Madrid said from a hospital bed. ‘I rushed him. I never saw a knife, but I just rushed him. I bear-hugged him. We were chest on chest. I was wrapping about to take him down to ground, but I didn’t have his arms. I had just my arms around his chest, so his arms were free. So that’s when he started stabbing me.’

Madrid said he thought the suspect was punching him. It wasn’t until other parishioners rushed the man, that Madrid realized he had been stabbed five times. ‘I was fading in and out. I really thought I was going to die. But if I’m going to die there’s no other place I’d rather be at than my church.’

The knifeman is in custody. Here’s an AP report.

 

Nominations for Flute Player of the Year are now closed.

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Comments

  1. Time for the president of the National Flute Association to release a statement that “The only thing that can stop a bad man with a knife is a good man with a flute.”

  2. I love that, too.

  3. That should dispel this image of the flute as an instrument for girls and sissies.

    My 14 year old son will be pleased to know that it is an instrument for heroes too.

    Wishing Gerald Madrid a speedy recovery following his courageous and selfless act,

  4. Here’s a link to an NFA article on this amazing player:
    https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=10151769608315116&id=105342625115

  5. Patricia the Terse says:

    Careful. If this gets out, the Obama adminstration will try to license people who purchase flutes, demand background checks and demand waiting periods before the flute can actually be taken home. Not to mention the ‘license to carry a concealed flute’ movement.

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