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Watch sacked conductor address his massed supporters

The conflict at the Rochester Philharmonic, in upstate New York, between the chief executive and the chief conductor led to the dismissal of the Norwegian maestro, Arild Remmereit. But his supporters are fighting back. Last night, Remmereit (l.) addressed a packed meeting.

arild

Watch him:

Read more here.¬†And here’s the full text of Arild’s speech.

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Comments

  1. Liane Curtis says:

    The latest petition to reinstate Remmereit insists that CEO Charles Owens needs to be fired, since he is the source of the poisonous management attitude that has undermined the popular music director’s leadership. http://tinyurl.com/FIRE-C-OWENS The previous petition http://tinyurl.com/petition-RPO offers a very wide range of the reasons that Remmereit’s supporters are so upset about the termination of his contract. The blog http://rpocommunity.wordpress.com/ offers letters from a range of community supporters as well.

  2. Norman, the article to which your link was directed was removed. Here is a web address for an article by Stuart Low about the conflict: http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2013301070032

  3. Rochester, we have a Maestro

    Yes, our situation in Rochester, NY is not that different from Houston’s; we have secured an outstanding maestro whose performances have electrified regional audiences since Fall, 2011.

    The comparison ends there, since we have a CEO dead-set from the start against this conductor who programs creatively, offering little-known pieces by women composers, and involving the arts community by incorporating painting and poetry into his performances.

    This manager and his hand-picked board have terminated Maestro Remmereit’s contract 2 years early. The audience loves him, as do many of his musicians, and we are fighting back against this unenlightened management disaster. This is not over – the fight goes on!

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