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Does he know what it’s worth?

Alex Ross in his new collection, Listen to This, makes reference to ‘a secondhand LP of Leonard Bernstein’s Eroica Symphony (which) ignited my love of classical music.’

As I read that paragraph, an email dropped from an archivist friend in Vienna, informing me that some of his old Bernstein vinyls fetch thousands on ebay. Apparently, they never pressed that many, especially of Lenny with the European orchestras. Thomas Hampson singing Mahler’s Kindertotenlieder with Bernstein and the Vienna Phil went for well over $2,500. The so-called Concert of the Century at Carnegie Hall is presently offered on www.abebooks.com for the same amount.
In pristine condition an old LP can be a thing of beauty, an artwork for the wall. But I can’t quite see its unique collectible value – except, perhaps, to those trufflers who amass old beer cans and cigarette packs to satisfy a hunter-gatherer need. Like most music lovers, I got rid of my vinyl for next to nothing 25 years ago when CDs took over. Don’t regret it, never will.
But if Alex has still got his Lenny Eroica, he might like to test the market. 
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Comments

  1. I, too, don’t regret discarding those old vinyls — but I sure as hell regret getting rid of those old classic (Superman) comic books! :)
    Great to see you on you recent US book-promo tour in Syracuse…
    DA
    Twitter: cnycafamomus

  2. I’ve still got some 500 vinyls, but no Beatles, Rolling Stones or for that matter Berstein. There is, however, some (relatively) early Maazel and Brendel.
    Have finished “Why Mahler” and hope to do a review at some stage.
    Best,
    AY
    Twitter: @alanayu

  3. M.Villeger says:

    Anyone who appreciate sound quality as a testimony to the art of music making and the vast dynamic superiority of vinyls, especially in 45 rpm packaging can only treasure “old” vinyls. On professional quality equipment I regularly play my father’s collection and I defy anyone and any CD to come even close to the quality and musicality of some 1960s pressed Decca or Mercury Living Presence recordings. In fact why do you think labels and manufacturers have created SACD if not to try to approach this quality of yesteryears?

  4. I still have some 500 vinyls, but no Beatles, Rolling Stones, or Bernstein. Some early Maazel and Brendel, though.
    Just finished “Why Mahler”. May do a review.
    Best,
    AY
    Twitter: @alanayu

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