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Delaware Museum Sells More Art

Homer-MilkingTime

The Delaware Art Museum issued a statement late yesterday saying that it had sold its beautiful Winslow Homer, Milking Time (at right), and a painting by Andrew Wyeth,  Arthur Cleveland, to pay off its debts. That makes four art works sold to pay for bad mistakes (overexpansion, imo) by the museum's board and administration. You'll remember that the museum has already auctioned off William Holman Hunt’s Isabella and the Pot of Basil, which fetched £2.5 million in London, and Alexander Calder's Black Crescent. The Calder was sold privately, … [Read more...]

The Broad Museum Answers Back

Robert-Longo-Untitled-Fer-010

Several days ago, I asked here if any other art museums in the U.S. were spending as much money buying art as the Crystal Bridges Museum. I had added up the announced purchases over the past year or so by Crystal Bridges and it came to more than $150 million. I could think of only the Broad, which hasn't opened yet, as a contender. This morning, I received an email from the Broad announcing "more than 50 new artworks added to the Broad collection in anticipation of the September 20 opening." But I still think CB is spending more. That's … [Read more...]

Crystal Bridges Makes A Few Announcments

d4913730x

When it come to art purchases, there could  be a "Crystal Bridges" watch--it seems to me that the museum in Bentonville built largely with Alice Walton's and the Walton Family Foundation's money is spending more money buying art than another other U.S. museum currently open to the public. For a short item in tomorrow's New York Times that is now online (and is a better, longer version than what will be in the print version), I disclose five more big purchases: two sculptures (including Quarantania, at left) and two paintings by Louise … [Read more...]

The Brooklyn, The Whitney…Oh My! (Or, While I Was Away…)

Donna de Salvo

I didn't actually post here at RCA that I would be away for about a week around the Memorial Day weekend, so I am sure that it looked as if I was perhaps speechless last week when major announcements came out from the Brooklyn Museum* and the Whitney Museum. I was simply AWOL--in Spain, actually, taking advantage of the strong dollar. I had a marvelous time viewing art in Madrid and nearby towns, and one visit is pertinent to those two aforementioned announcements. Not the Brooklyn release, which named Anne Pasternak as successor to … [Read more...]

The Shocking Cooper Hewitt, Part Two

CHM7

Aside from the maltreatment of its beautiful historic building, which I wrote about here nearly three weeks ago, something else is deeply wrong with the new incarnation of the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum: the display and the contextualization of the objects in the displays simply don't measure up to minimal standards. To be sure, visually they are often attractive. But frequently they are very dumbed down, witless and perhaps even misleading. I think the museum's leadership meant well; I really do. But I think they misjudged their … [Read more...]

The Shocking Cooper Hewitt

photo 3

Many curtain-raisers for and reviews of the newly renovated and reconceived Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum have focused on its use of technology to make the museum interactive, participatory and therefore supposedly of more interest to young generations who are not satisfied with just looking. One recent Saturday, I finally made it to this new incarnation to see for myself. I didn't mind the interactive technology. I liked much of it. Some of it was fun to play with. At one station, I designed a lovely outdoor sculpture. I did not get … [Read more...]

A Giant Step Forward At The Met

ghost dance

When I visited The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky at the Metropolitan Museum on Saturday afternoon, I was prepared to be delighted--and I was, in more ways than one. The Nelson-Atkins Museum, which co-curated the show with the Musee du Quai Branly in Paris, had primed me for how beautiful it was going to be, sending along the catalogue as evidence when the show opened in Kansas City last fall. At the Met, the exhibit lived up to my great expectations. So many of these objects are stunningly beautiful. But from the very first … [Read more...]

The Coke Bottle And The High: Too Close For Comfort?

coca-cola

The commercialization and entertainmentization of art museums continues. The High Museum in Atlanta just stooped to mounting an exhibit titled The Coca-Cola Bottle: An American Icon at 100.  Atlanta is the birthplace of Coca-Cola and the company is probably a major benefactor of many organizations, including the High, in Atlanta. But still. I could not find, in a fairly quick search, how much money Coke gives to the High. But it may be substantial. Interestingly, the "vice chair-exhibitions" of the High's board of trustees is Michael Keough, … [Read more...]

“Provocative Intervention” In Dulwich’s Galleries

Made in China

The other day, the Dulwich Picture Gallery announced a 2015 program with "an intervention in the Gallery’s permanent collection offering a provocative challenge to the public." And what could that be? Rather provocatively, it's an exhibition called Made in China, and it's described this way in the press release, as ...a unique intervention that questions the significance and value of the ‘original’ work of art. ‘Made in China: A Doug Fishbone Project’ (10 February–26 July 2015), will see one of the paintings in Dulwich’s collection removed … [Read more...]

Walters’ Founding Story: Good, Except…

Hoarfrost-Rousseau

I really enjoyed my visit to the Walters Art Museum early this year. However, it is suffering a malady that must be discussed--because it is far from the only museum afflicted by this disease. I went to see From Rye to Raphael: The Walters Story, a new installation that is intended to inform (or remind) people of William and Henry Walters, the father-and-son founders who amassed the original collection. That's a good idea not only because what they bought comprises 70 percent of the collection today but also because 1)  viewing art through … [Read more...]

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