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About That Stolen Guercino

StolenGuercino

This is just plain bad: Last week, a painting titled Madonna with the Saints John the Evangelist and Gregory Thaumaturgus (1639) was stolen from a church in Modena, Italy. Not only was the church alarm system in active, but also the Baroque masterpiece wasn't insured. It's a big painting -- 10 ft. by 6 ft. -- and reports say it was stolen in its frame, with speculation that the theft was "ordered" by a private collector because a work of this size and renown would be hard ever to resell openly. Unless, speculated the Telegraph in London, it … [Read more...]

Take Control of The Tate, With A Robot, After Dark

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If an interactive experience with art is all the rage these days -- and to some people it is -- the latest project (I don't know what else to call it) at the Tate in London is both in vogue and new. I think -- at least I've not heard of anything like this. It's called After Dark and it just won the inaugural IK Prize, which is going to be awarded annually by the Tate to a project that "celebrates digital creativity and seeks to widen access to art through the application of digital technology." (That's per the press release.) After … [Read more...]

Watching Art Be Made

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Many people love going behind the scenes -- and many art museums now offer some sort of occasion or event to do so. Next week, if you're in Washington, the Freer-Sackler will let us all in on the installation of Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota, who is representing her country at the Venice Biennale next year. I was struck by the photos the Freer* sent me, and so decided to share them here, along with some of the information in the press release announcing the Aug. 18-21 installation. For her installation, Shiota -- based in Berlin -- "will … [Read more...]

Fourth of July Post

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The Morgan Library & Museum has put on display a rare first edition of “The Star Spangled Banner,” marking the 200th anniversary in 2014 of the origination of the famous anthem. And the Morgan is open today, until 5 p.m., in case you're looking for something to do in the rain. Also, it has its regular hours this weekend. Since it's a holiday, I'll quote completely from the Morgan's press release: Francis Scott Key’s poem, inspired by the sight of the flag defiantly flying over Fort McHenry after the British attack in September 1814, was … [Read more...]

Public Art: The Video And The Cathedral

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They're excited in San Antonio about a new video installation in their town called The Saga by a French artist named Xavier de Richemont. (How do I know? The Visit San Antonio website calls it a "world class video art installation.")  I thought I'd write briefly about it here because the piece is cast onto the facade of the 18th century San Fernando Cathedral, which is the seat of the archdiocese of San Antonio and a working church. The Saga has nothing to do with religion, though -- it's about the city's history, "the historical … [Read more...]

Delaware Deaccession Strategy: Sell Just Two Works?

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The London auction offering William Holman Hunt's Isabella and the Pot of Basil  from the Delaware Art Museum is a month away (June 17) but the catalogue is set to be released only on Monday. It's pretty clear why: the museum wanted to sell it privately, but Christie's couldn't come up with a buyer who would pay the required price. The painting carries an estimate of £5 to £8 million, or $8.4 to $13.4 million at today's exchange rates, according to an article in the Wilmington News Journal.  It adds that the catalogue for the Victorian, … [Read more...]

Keep The Pre-Raphaelite, Sell Contemporary Art, Expert Says

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While inveighing against the Delaware Art Museum's planned deacccession of William Holman Hunt's Isabella and the Pot of Basil at Christie's in London next month,  Pre-Raphaelite expert Mark Samuels Lasner (below) brought up a very touchy subject: why not sell undistingished contemporary artworks instead? Lasner, who according to USA Today is "a senior research fellow at the University of Delaware Library and an expert on Victorian literature and art," called the planned sale "sacrilege." "Isabella and the Pot of Basil is "an … [Read more...]

The Word Is Out From Delaware Art Museum

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The first painting that Delaware Art Museum trustees have chosen to deaccession is not, as many expected, Winslow Homer's Milking Time. Rather, they've chosen a pre-Raphaelite painting by William Holman Hunt, Isabella and the Pot of Basil.  Christie's has placed it in its June 17 London sale of Victorian, Pre-Raphaelite & British Impressionist Art. But the catalogue is not yet online and the estimate has not been disclosed. Going against traditional museum ethics rules -- and some say without exploring all other options -- the museum … [Read more...]

174 LACMA Donors = $4.1 Million + 10 Varied Acquisitions

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This past weekend, collectors associated with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art set a record at their 29th annual Collectors Committee fundraiser -- contributing more than $4.1 million and deciding to buy 10 quite diverse works of art. Among the artworks: Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres’ Odalisque (below right); contemporary works by Roni Horn, Chinese artist Feng Mengbo and Iranian artist Mitra Tabrizian; an 18th-century Virgin of Guadalupe by Antonio de Torres; a pair of 9th century Japanese lions (below left) and a print -- Taureau et … [Read more...]

Can You Discern What Is A Caravaggio And What Isn’t?

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If experts can't agree, I probably can't tell (though I might have an opinion). Nonetheless, in this age of crowd-sourcing virtually everything that can be crowd-sourced, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston is asking its visitors to answer that question. Since Apr. 12, the museum has presented a small exhibit of four paintings by the artist in Visiting Masterpieces: Caravaggio and Connoisseurship. Two, Fortune Teller (c 1594–95) and Fra Antonio Martelli, Knight Grand Cross of the Order of Malta (c 1608), are accepted as by the master -- though … [Read more...]

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