Pat head, rub tummy

Within solo piano music, it happens that the individual must play two very differing things at the same time. In Beethoven’s Opus 110, the right and left hands have different patterns of articulation and emphasis.

B110AJ2.jpg

For me, it would be best if the heavy, syncopated comic accents in the left-hand music do not in any way effect the folk simplicity of the paired-note articulation above, in the highest voice in the right hand part.

In doing these two emphasis-patterns, perhaps the solo pianist is called upon to be two (or three) people, to summon two feelings?

Making certain music, I am a duo, or a band. I’m a schizophrenic? Or in the nuanced possession of a capacity to be, or do for two.

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Comments

  1. says

    “Making certain music, I am a duo, or a band. I’m a schizophrenic? Or in the nuanced possession of a capacity to be, or do for two.”
    You obviously know far more about the piano repertoire than I do, but I always thought sections like these were intended to be unified as different aspects of one performer. For instance, if you were to record both hands separately, so that they were entirely independent, the effect would (I think) sound wrong. Or even use two pianists, so that the resonances within the piano were correct, it would still not sound right.

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