Results tagged “philadelphia theatre company” from Drama Queen

I preface this entry by saying that aside from being elected the first African-American president, there is probably no greater feat in my mind than pulling off a one-person show. It takes such chutzpah that even the act of not completely pulling it off is still a triumph of the spirit, of the timeless human drive to make meaning of our lives, to show that among the millions of people across several millenia who have lived and died, this story also matters. And that's a noble effort, indeed.

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But when all things are equal, as they mostly are in the following two reviews of recent one-person shows, what makes one float and the other take on water? In the case of Tony Braithwaite's Look Mom, I'm Swell vs. Judy Gold's 25 Questions for a Jewish Mother, there are plenty of parallels. Both shows, obviously, explore their creators' relationships with their mothers. Both grew up as awkward, drama-loving outsiders. Both use impressions in their act, I guess to diffuse the cumulative effect of watching one person talk about him/herself for an hour-and-a-half. And both were professional pieces performed in major area houses (Gold's house was a bit more major than Braithwaite's but I suppose major is in the eye of the beholder anyway). So why did I like one so much more than the other?

I guess the difference here is partly due to the intangible charisma factor--Braithwaite is just slightly more humble and self-effacing--but I think it also helps that he's just plain more honest about what he's trying to achieve. Tony Braithwaite wants to talk about Tony Braithwaite, pure and simple, and in this honest (internal) declaration, he makes it his business to convince the audience he's worth watching. Gold is less honest about her goals, and though what she really wants to discuss is her relationship with her mother, she builds a complicated structure that not only distracts from her own story, but might just have been a better idea on its own. Or at least an entirely worthwhile--but separate idea. If someone invites you over for a dinner party and during the hors d'oeuvres whips out their Amway catalogue (or whatever Jewish women sell, say, Pampered Chef housewares), you're going to spend the rest of the evening feeling at least a little taken aback. Gold isn't selling Amway with her act, but it's not exactly the dinner party she promised, either.

Anyway, you can judge for yourself. Here's my review of Tony Braithwaite's Look Mom, I'm Swell. Here's my review of Judy Gold's 25 Questions for a Jewish Mother. Both are from the Philadelphia Inquirer.

December 16, 2008 12:44 PM | | Comments (4)
My most recent review, Delaware Theatre Company's Master Harold... And the Boys, got me thinking. It seems like there's a burst of African-American issues-related shows in Philly this season--Driving Miss Daisy, Gee's Bend (which, if anyone cares, I thought had a really clunky script but some excellent acting by Kala Moses Baxter and one of my new favorites on the scene, Kes Khemnu), Sizwe Bansi Is Dead, Resurrection, Day of the Picnic--just about every major theater has one show in its season with this theme.*

I suppose part of the reason for the change is that everyone's capitalizing on the election, but really, it started with a recent thrust of nontraditional casting before Obama became the clear presidential candidate and has just sort of snowballed. And while this mass shift in programming focus is certainly long overdue and welcome, well, it begs the real question: why can't Philadelphia, a city whose population is 45% African American, support a dedicated professional African American theater? Since Walter Dallas' departure and Freedom Repertory Theatre's demise (and that's a whole 'nother long story) no one has stepped in to fill the void, and I'm going to guess it's not because Philadelphians are okay with leaving the issue of inclusion to the whims of the city's various white artistic directors, or catching the random touring urban theater production. 

Mind you, I'm not knocking the efforts at diversity being made by any of these other companies. I think it's great for the city and even better for expanding everyone's audience base. But honestly, what is going on here, and why? 


*By the way Philly folks, I'm omitting InterAct from inclusion and discussion on this post, as their commitment to programming diversity has been part of their mission since the company's inception.


October 23, 2008 10:51 AM | | Comments (5)
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