Results tagged “o'neill critics institute” from Drama Queen

Several of my colleagues--including this year's KCACTF winner Mark Costello--have already begun the two-week-long O'Neill Critics Institute (OCI), and I'm very excited to be headed up there in the morning. This year, from July 14-18, the American Theatre Critics Association (ATCA) hosts its national conference alongside the OCI, and I'll be speaking on a panel about theater criticism and new media. 

For me, it's been an interesting and frustrating e-year--interesting because there are so many more potential ways to disseminate arts coverage than there were even as recently as last year, and frustrating because instead of being mandatory, they're still overlooked by nearly every theater reviewing outlet in Philadelphia. While I'd like to see every print-based arts-covering journalist in this city get together with their bosses to discuss a multi-platform approach and create content wherein what appears online complements and/or supplements what appears on paper (including freelancers who, though we have largely replaced staffers, don't get the idea-tossing benefits of regular staff meetings), it hasn't happened yet. 

So here's what I can do something about: the comments section. Although the comments section is generally regarded as the exclusive province of trolls and there's a general rule that you don't feed them, this hasn't been my experience. Perhaps it's because the audience that cares enough to comment on theater is different (*cough* better *cough*) than the audience for stories about sports or politics. And while I occasionally get the reader who just plain calls me a hack WITHOUT USING A SPECIFIC EXAMPLE (note to you, dear reader: I am always specific in my critiques), there are far more people who leave a mini-review or call me out with a differing opinion. I also find that when I jump into the fray, it makes for a far livelier conversation with more commenters, and remains active far longer than the usual review.

I've gotten varying opinions on this practice from colleagues. Some say it's a great way to make the review come to life. Others say once a review appears, it's time to let readers do the talking. I've heard from readers grateful that I'm still engaged with the work, and still others who say it's just poor form to get down there in the muck. 

So what do you think? If you're a critic, do you like to engage in discussion with your readers? If you're a reader, do you want to hear from a critic, or would you rather continue the conversation on your own? 
July 13, 2010 4:18 PM | | Comments (7)
The 2010 Region II Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival O'Neill Critics Institute winner is...

Villanova University graduate Student Mark J. Costello (From now on, he'd like to be referred to by his professional name, "SarcMark").
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Our alternate is Muhlenberg College freshman Amy Asendorf.
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But really, all the students are winners. Under ordinary circumstances that might sound pretty trite. However, these weren't ordinary circumstances. The class' late nights, early mornings, dedication to the work, and support for one another was remarkable. The night they wrote their final reviews, they also critiqued a group speed-writing exercise, tweeted with me about the assignment at 3 a.m., and still showed up early for our 9:30 a.m. class. I mean, I took writing workshops in college, and I guess we must have worked, but I sure don't recall anyone working like that.

Much thanks and deep respect to this year's critics, and also to over 2,000 people who followed the critics' progress on this blog; it was really helpful and motivating for these new, young writers to know they had a built-in audience. 
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Also, special thanks to Clarion College English professor Ralph Leary, tireless organizer of the OCI and one of the few people on earth who every year spends a week with a room full of critics and still walks away with glowing reviews.
January 17, 2010 8:00 PM | | Comments (1)
Today was the critics' first day of critic class and I felt it was important to make one thing abundantly clear before we even met: critics aren't just critics anymore. That's why, upon entering our classroom, each student opened a Twitter account (fellow tweeters can follow #kcactf2 to see what they're up to), hitched it to their Facebook accounts, and pitched me a feature story related to the festival. Along the way, we lost one student (Meredith Young) and an e-mail (Michael Cook didn't get the query request, so you'll have to wait until tomorrow to see his work) and gained another student. Also, I apologize in advance for the inconsistent formatting; I can't seem to get this post to appear in a single font.

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So without further interference from me, here's Amy Asendorf. Born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland, Amy is currently a Dana Scholar freshman at Muhlenberg College. As a junior and senior at Hereford High School, Amy participated as a critic for the Baltimore chapter of the Cappies Critics and Awards Program, serving as lead critic her senior year. Her review for Atholton High School's The Diary of Anne Frank was selected for publication in The View newspaper in 2007. Amy was also heavily involved with the International Thespian Society, acting in a number of productions, choreographing, and serving as president her senior year. Additionally, in 2009, she won first prize in the Hunt Valley Rotary Four-Way Speech contest for her original speech entitled, "Childhood: Going Once, Going Twice." Most recently, Amy has been hired by the Muhlenberg Writing Center and will begin her work in the fall of 2010. 


Now that all the formalities are out of the way, editors, journalists, and those with an interest in reading about theater are welcome to tell the students which article (or articles) wins them a paycheck and a clip, and why.

Query 1:
Dear Editor,

The Kennedy Center American College Theater Regional Festival is a massive event, consisting of dozens of shows put on by hundreds of students from a vast variety of different colleges, all descending upon one place at one time. What does it take to organize a conference of this size and scope? How does one handle that much information and corroborate with so many people successfully? 

I would like to present an 800 word article that tackles this question through an interview with one of the organizers - Elizabeth van den Berg, the Region II Vice-chair. Ms. van den Berg is responsible for a large amount of the organization behind the event, and an interview would provide a more personal lens through which to view the underlying structure of the event. 

The article is a behind-the-scenes look at KCACTF, examining how the event is organized from an insider's perspective, looking at the nitty-gritty behind the process. I look specifically at how one balances so many varied factors with the pressures of real life and teaching theater, as well as what the festival itself means to the people working on it.

As an English major specializing in creative nonfiction, I have a strong grasp of the English language and knowledge of how to write for magazines. Furthermore, I have worked personally with Ms. van den Berg for over four years on projects both in school and out, and am familiar with her and her work process. I thus have easy access to my interview source.

I feel that this article is an ideal subject for your magazine, and I hope that it piques your interest. Thank you for your time.

- B. Jensen Toperzer

Query 2:
The Indiana Metropolitan Times

"Pennsylvania's #3 metropolitan newspaper."

1239 Reality Road

Indiana Pa, 15705

www.isweartogodthisisarealnewspaper.com

Dear Editor,

The theater world has a new and exciting craze that's popping up in small drama companies all across the country. It's an incredible movement called "24 hour theater." This new twist on drama involves paring down the usually lengthy and exhausting process of writing, workshopping  and producing a fully staged show from  what could be several years to just a single day. This bold new form of expression is usually done in a festival setting where a rag-tag group of writers, directors, actors and designers are frantically thrown together into teams. They are then given a concept and (you guessed it) 24 hours to write, produce and perform a ten minute play. These festivals are usually teeming with the theater scene's amateurs, all of them desperate for that first chance to express their vision on the stage.

This sounds lovely, but do the theater-goers of your readers really want to go see a play (or series of plays) that have been haphazardly built over the course of a single day? What's the appeal of 24-hour theater to an audience?

I would like to offer your publication a 1,200-1,500 word feature article entitled "The Fringe Challenge--a look inside the new form of spontaneous theater" that answers that very question.  The article will take a very in-depth look at one of the many spontaneous  theater festivals that has popped up in the region--The Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival's Fringe Challenge. While the Fringe Challenge is technically 48 hour theater, it's still got all the aspects one would expect from a 24 hour theater fest. Best of all, this year's challenge is held at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, located in the back yard of most of your publication's reader base.

The article will go in depth into the conceptual side of this new art form, opening up with the Fringe Challenge's long-time director, Len Kelly. It will then feature interviews with several of the Challenge's participants--where they will share their background in theater and their passion for this fun new way of looking at the performance arts. The article will be a collage of different stories from a wild and maddening 48 hour period that leaves its participants and audience members forever transformed. It will show amateurs pull off stunning theatrical feats that--given the circumstances--seem almost impossible.

The article can also have several aspects on your publications website if desired. Full audio interviews with participants are available and several groups involved have agreed to have their chaotic writing and rehearsal sessions filmed for internet publication--giving further breadth to this experience.

The Fringe Challenge begins on January 12th , and goes live on the night of the 14th.  The article and online aspects can be available to you by as early as the 15th.

Sincerely,

Peter Starr Northrop

Query 3:

Dear Editor,

How many times have you driven down an unknown street in Philadelphia, and had a chill run down your spine? Did you immediately lock your doors, and accelerate your car to escape the block? If you have then the Temple University theater department's production of Shot! wants to have a brief word with you.


I'd like to offer you a 1,200-word article entitled "Song of the Street". The theater department of Temple University has conceived a brand newperformance piece entitled Shot! The piece gives audience members an inside look at Beirut, a Northern Philadelphia urban community, whose image has been tarnished from the 1964 riots.


My article will examine the process that the production team of Shot! went through and give an inside look at the process that goes into putting a piece of this nature together. Temple University uses poetry, monologues, songs, and documentary footage to create an authentic narrative and perspective of a neighborhood that has been. 


Through interviews with writer Kimmika Williams-Witherspoon, director Doug Wager, and a few members of the ensemble members I will give readers an insight into the process. I will also have video recordings of the interview to place on your website. As a theater artist and scholar I believe that it is important to highlight this production and highlight the Docudrama performance style. I believe that through this production, Philadelphia citizens will get an insider's perspective into the real story of their community and an insight in the process that goes into putting a piece of this nature together. 


I would like to thank you for your time, and I look forward to hearing back from you! 


Connor Davis


Query 4:

Dear Editor,

Is there really such a drastic gap between entertainment for children versus entertainment for adults?  And do basic instincts and values change over time or are the morals instilled in us as children timeless?  Actors and adult audience members alike tend to look at children's productions as a "dumbed-down" version of stereotypical theatre.  On the contrary, children's theatre explores a different aspect of creative expression, taking a script and interpreting the text to be universally relatable. 

I would like to offer you a 1,000 word article entitled, "Rediscovering Childhood in a World of Professionalism."  The article would explore the importance of well rounded theatrical exposure, the connection between a mature and elementary script style as well as Indiana University of Pennsylvania's effect on the youth of the community.  IUP's presentation of A Year with Frog and Toad by Willie and Robert Reale opened my eyes to the lack of children's style shows in production, especially at the collegiate level.  These specific points are supported with interview quotes of the cast and director, Rob Gretta, as well as video clips of recent productions. 

The lack of children's theatre workshops and events at KCACTF further proves the reasoning behind this article.  According to the Children's Theatre Company in Minneapolis, children's theatre is a completely different focus for the performing arts that has consistently increased in both revenue and popularity over the last decade.  Shouldn't professors, actors, directors and theatre goers alike place more weight and interest on this steadily growing field? 

Children's theatre can be thought of as the foundation of theatrical experience.  If an actor or director can interpret a script and convey its message to a sea of children, then they can take the basics of a mature script and convey its ideas to a sea of educated adults. 

As an actor, newly evolving director, and avid writer I feel that I have an extremely diverse and multi-faceted viewpoint and would therefore be the best candidate to write for your journal.  I am a junior musical theatre major and nonprofit studies minor at James Madison University and have recently worked with JMU's Professional Children's Playshop in the summer of 2009.  I have a passion for children and the importance of theatre in their ever-changing development as productive and artistic citizens.

I thank you for taking the time to review and consider my proposal and I look forward to hearing your response.  If you are interested in the details of my research or this unconventional perspective, I would be glad to have my article, "Rediscovering Childhood in a World of Professionalism" on your desk within two weeks of hearing your response.  Thank you again.

Sincerely,

Kelly Wetherald

Query 5:

Dear Editor,

Many people are fascinated by the survival stories of the men and women who endured life in concentration camps during the Holocaust, but how often do we really stop and think about how hard and grueling their lives must have been?  There are plenty of books and documentaries on this subject, but few have ventured to take these stories to the stage.  A Comb and a Prayer Book: A Survivor's Story, by Pamela Hendrick, is the story of Elizabeth Blum, who, by the age of nineteen, had endured life in six concentration camps.  It is based on personal interviews and the book written by her granddaughter, Shana Fogarty.

I would like to offer you a 1000-word article title "Staging the Holocaust," which examines the long process of transforming the book and interviews of this Holocaust survivor into a theatrical production.  Specifically, I will examine the process of the show performed by The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey at the 42nd Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival held in Indiana, Pennsylvania.

The stage is a place where we see stories brought to life, made into a reality.  This article will explain exactly how that is made possible.  It will follow the show's development from a simple interview, to the writing of the book, and finally, to the stage.  It will not only present the difficulties in putting such an emotional event under the lights, but it will explain the effect that doing so can hold.  Staging historical events is different from creating a movie on the subject in that the action is experienced right before our very eyes; the audience is in the moment, and is able to relive a bit of history.  This not only creates a bridge to the past, but it furthers one's appreciation of the present.

As a Theatre major at James Madison University, I have had the privilege to work on various shows and see exactly how they come into existence on the stage.  This story is unique, however, and travels far beyond the stage curtain. 

I hope that you sense my passion for this subject and if interested, I can have my full article to you within two weeks of your approval.  I am looking forward to hearing from you.  

Thank you for your time,

Valerie Gibbs

Query 6:

Dear Editor,

The other day I saw a four-year-old teach her father how to use his I-Phone to take a picture.  Generations in this country find it difficult to communicate because they do not communicate through the same media.  Temple University's theatrical production of Shot! at the Kennedy Center's American College Theatre Festival held at IUP mixes the formal medium of theatre with the technological medium of film to form a multi-generational, live-technology medium and  discuss racial issues in past and present Philadelphia.

I want to offer you a 1000 word article entitled "Snap-Shot!:  Temple University's Shot! Discusses the Role of Race in Past and Present Northern Philadelphia."  Shot! utilizes live and prerecorded interviews with our city's citizens of past and present to shed a new light on racial prejudice from 1964 to today.

"Snap-Shot!" addresses how the fuse of theatre and film made a new medium for addressing race in Shot!  Interviews from old and new generations of Northern-Philadelphian audience members explore how Shot! acts a gateway to new racial frontiers.  The article concludes with the idea that interlocking technology and race in Shot! helps two generations of Philadelphians share accounts of racial strife.

This article is important to Philadelphians because it demonstrates how multi-media performance in Shot! starts a new discussion that is accessible to all generations and races.

As a Native-American critic and a product of today's technology codependency, I offer insight into how using a timeless medium to fuse generations and discuss racial tension.  Additionally, "A Night at the KCACTF Drive-In," my runner-up critique in last year's American College Theatre Festival, provides insight into my exploration of the use of live-technology in Shot!

I hope that I can interest you in sharing this discussion with the city of Philadelphia.  If you are interested in publishing this article in your upcoming edition, then I can have it on your desk within 24 hours.  If you would like to propose any other topics for me to write on, please contact me.  Thank you for your time and interest.

Sincerely,

Robby Bassler

Query 7:

Dear Editor,


It's always wonderful when we get to celebrate ambassadors of the City of Brotherly Love going forth and accomplishing great things, especially when our community was able to watch that group develop its talent. One such moment is quickly approaching and attention must be paid: the Arcadia University Theater has been selected to attend the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival in January. There, Arcadia will be presenting their production of Samm Art-Williams' Home which ran in late October 2009. KCACTF recognizes and awards the best and brightest theater talent nationwide. Arcadia's student theater group has already received a number of merit certificates from the festival and now, they will have the chance to perform a full-length show in competition for celebrated theater professionals.

For your publication, I would like to write an 800 - 1,000 word article tentatively entitled: "Taking Home With Them." The piece will detail the production's path from stunning hometown show to successful, recognized opus as follows:

·      Back story. By interviewing Mark Wade (director), Taysha Canales, Brianna McBride Pope, and Jamal Douglas (all of them ensemble actors and KCACTF merit certificate winners), I will provide a look at the driving personalities behind the work's hometown success. I will also detail their connection to the Philadelphia area in depth.

·      Outcome. After establishing the group's path to the festival, the remainder of the piece will be devoted to detailing the students' current preparation for performance, the outcome of the competition, and the students' reaction to it.

I am a master's candidate in theater at Villanova University, a program I entered after spending four undergraduate years performing on a college stage. I have worked in various positions in two prominent Philadelphia theater companies (PTC and Theatre Exile). As such, I
am highly concerned with rising college theater companies that are making the Philadelphia cultural scene proud, such as Arcadia. I hope that a piece with as rich a connection to Philadelphia as this can find a home with your publication; if so, I can have it to you by January 20th. I thank you for reading my correspondence, and hope to hear from you!

Best,

Mark J. Costello

Query 8:

Dear Editor,

Beads of sweat dot the furrowed brow of the twentysomething actor. They gently cascade down his nose while the butterflies in his stomach do choreographed air shows. Throw on top of this the fact that he is competing against 200 other students for a chance at a scholarship. Thus is a case of one student who is taking part in the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival (KCACTF) Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship.

I would like to offer you a 1000 word article on the journey of local college students who take part in the KCACTF Region II scholarship program (tentative title- Going for Granny: Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship).

In the article I would specifically like to track the progress of three to four students who take part in the process. Here I hope to examine their feelings about auditions, acting, and what the scholarship would mean to them.

To begin with, the article will briefly introduce the reader to exactly how students are selected. I will then follow the stories of three to four local college students who are competing in the competition. This will paint a picture of the experience of each actor's time in the Ryan audition process. Following the festival I will sit down with each student and conduct a formal interview. Here I will gets the reflections of each student after all is said and done.

As a former Irene Ryan partner and actor I know the strife auditions can cause and the journey students go through academically while honing their craft. These students are the future of theatrical arts, and they are products of this paper's base. I hope you find interest in this topic, and I am looking forward to your response. I can have a copy of it to you 3 weeks following the regional competition and your approval. Again thank you for your time!

Sincerely,

Shawn Arnold

Query 9:

Dear Editor,

Angry shouts are heard in the distance.  You walk around the corner and down a street.  The sound grows louder.  You continue around yet another corner and find the source:  a large group of political activists spreading a message.  What might be the most intriguing aspect of the group is that they are made up of college students.  The college student body has traditionally been a political force to be reckoned with and the theatre has proven to be an excellent venue to send a message.

I am offering to write an article entitled something to the affect of "Political College Theatre - You Cannot Stop It!" that would be some 3,000 - 4,000 words in length on the political nature of college theatre and how it is bound to continue to be a natural choice of medium and venue through which a political message may be conveyed using the shows featured at this year's American College Theatre Festival in region two as examples. 

The article will include commentaries on the festival's productions of A Comb and a Prayer Book:  A Survivor's Story, Increased Difficulty of Concentration, and Widows Each have a political or social issue behind them (genocide, sexual morality in the workplace, and repressive government, respectively).  I will also include interviews with the cast and director of A Comb and a Prayer Book in my article, to gain a better demonstrate the potency of the political college theatre scene.  What's more, if you should chose to pursue the publication of this article, I will provide the full audio to the interviews I will be conducting.

My article would focus on the political and social aspects of each play and how college theatre groups will use plays like the ones that will be seen at the festival to make their own charged statement as well as how colleges are an ideal place to present a political play.

I hope to hear from you soon and that the topic of my article might be of interest to your publication. Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

Nicholas Barilar

Query 10:

Dear Editor,

You find yourself at an audition, receive a cold reading, and are told to go with no time to prepare.  The casting director vaguely asks you to try something "different."  Your scene partner drops their line and everyone stands around awkwardly, now unsure of both themselves and the scene.  Whatever the scenario, there is one solution accessible to all - improv.  With some sort of improvisational training, actors will never find themselves stumped in any sort of circumstance.

I would like to offer you an 800 word article titled "The Importance of Improv: Imagination in Action."  The article would discuss the significance of actors attending improv classes and workshops, and provide an evaluation of several workshops, informing readers about various teachers and their methods.

Take Gail Winar's workshop "Theatre Games," being taught at the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival this week.  It describes itself as a way to "explore theater games and improvisational exercises to wake up your creativity, imagination, and awareness during the rehearsal process."  In my own experience, there are several types of directors, and a number of them have no problem with an actor bringing their own ideas to the table - some, in fact, encourage it.  Through improv, one can open themselves up, becoming more extroverted and willing to share their ideas.

Another area improv can help an actor explore is physicality; with enough creativity and a willingness to explore their environment and their body, actors can discover mannerisms unique to their character that they might never have dared to try before.  Improv is no simple chocolate or vanilla but rather the Neapolitan, where no one bite is exactly the same as the last.  Improv is a tasty gift that changes in every new situation.

The great American improvist Viola Spolin once wrote in her book "Improvisation for the Theatre" that "everyone can improvise."  Whether or not every person has the ability to travel to Second City or star on "Saturday Night Live" is of no matter; the mere introduction of improv can enhance an actor's innate skills.  My article will show the influence of improv by interviewing those who attend these workshops, and asking them how each class heightened the skills they already had.

I was not only involved in improv in high school, but also at my college (James Madison University's "New and Improv.'d").  The value of the practices, the conferences we visit, and the myriad of classes we attend is unfathomable, so I speak from experience when I say that improv is an inestimable tool that should be utilized by every actor.

Please let me know if you have any interest in this article or its subject matter, and I can have a finalized copy of the article delivered to you within a week.  Thank you for your time. 

Sincerely,
Nathan Taylor

That's all for the pitches; the students are waiting to hear if any of these result in a home run. Tomorrow I'll post their first reviews, and appropriately enough, the two shows they saw today run the emotional gamut from comedy to tragedy. Both have literary roots, but A Year with Frog and Toad, based on Arnold Lobel's children's stories, and A Comb and a Prayer Book, based on Elizabeth Blum Goldstein's Holocaust memoir, couldn't be more different. I'm really looking forward to seeing how they handle this analytical mood swing, and I hope you are too.

January 13, 2010 8:31 PM | | Comments (1)
The Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival's Region II O'Neill Critics Institute starts at Indiana University of Pennsylvania on Tuesday. I know that's a lot of qualifiers, but I, for one, am unqualified in my excitement about this year's event. Thus far, we're set to have the largest enrollment ever in this region, plus, two of last year's contenders will return to try again for their chance at the golden ticket. This is a big deal because, as you may have heard, the profession is in a bit of a holding pattern (cough, nosedive, cough) right now. But it does my heart good to see this many students undeterred; the more young, creative, tech-savvy minds willing to give arts journalism a go, the likelier it is that someone will grab the controls and steer us in a new direction. That would be nice, since spending so long preparing for impact really has me cramped up. 

As was the case last year, readers of this blog (and especially KCACTF participants) are invited to chime in with feedback for our writers. Ready to meet them? 

Shawn Arnold.jpgShawn Arnold is a senior at Clarion University and theater fanatic! He is currently pursing a B.F.A in acting, B. A. in history, and B. S. in secondary social studies education. His most recent stage appearance was in Clarion's production of David Mamet's one man show, Mr. Happiness. Some of his other theater appearances on the Clarion stage include a company member in the neo-futurist play 43 Plays for 43 Presidents, George in the dark one-act Shel Silverstein play Wash and Dry, and Mark Twain in Hauptman and Miller's musical Big River. Aside from theater and history, Shawn is also obsessed with the silly dead-pan antics of The Office and It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia. He is excited to join Wendy and the institute again in its new incarnation following last year. He cannot wait for another chance to do it again . . . "That's what she said." [Ed. Note: Assuming here Mr. Arnold isn't referring to his teacher.]

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Nic Barilar is a southern California native who fell in love with theatre at the Pantages in Los Angeles. He currently resides in the tundra of western Pennsylvania where he is a BFA acting major with technical theater and English literature minors at Clarion University of Pennsylvania. As an actor, he has been seen in such productions as Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor DreamcoatPsycho Beach PartyMuch Ado About Nothing, and Brigadoon. Theatrically speaking, Nic also is interested in playwrighting, set design, and improvisation. Nic is an avid fan of the work of Stephen Sondheim. Apart from theatre, he enjoys reading the works of Stephen KingVictor Hugo, and Voltaire as well as playing piano, singing, and waxing humorous with his chums. Nic hopes to learn about a vital aspect of the theatrical world as well as improve his analytical abilities.

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Robby Apple Bassler is currently enrolled as a senior in his last semester at James Madison University where he studies theater and English. This is his second time participating in the Kennedy Center's Critic's Institute; he received the runner up award during last year's competition in Region IV. Robby is also a playwright, director, actor, and technician but enjoys the potential of combining his knowledge of all of these elements in the world of critiquing. In his near future, Robby hopes to join Teach For America teaching theater in New York City and pass down what he has learned at the Kennedy Center's Critic's Institute.

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Michael Antonio Cook has been practicing theater in some form for almost half of his life. From an early age he has developed the ability to quickly form opinions and impressions on things and has an incredible memory. Because of this he has decided to try his hand at being a critic to share these insights he has with the world.

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Mark Costello is a second-year Master's student in the theater program at Villanova University where he focuses primarily on dramaturgy and playwriting. Most recently, he has served as the production dramaturg for Villanova's 2009 run of The Zoo Story; he is currently serving as the assistant dramaturg for the Philadelphia Theatre Company's world premiere of Terrence McNally's Golden Age. As a dramaturg, he believes that an easy and free flow of culturally relevant information helps a production inform both itself and its audience; as such, he's excited to begin doing critical work with the O'Neill Critics Institute so that he can engage with audiences instructionally through print and internet media.

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Connor Davis: I am a junior theatre major at James Madison University. At JMU I worked extensively as a stage manager and director. In high school, I directed an "abridged" 30-minute version of The Compleat Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged). The show competed in the Bucks County Playhouse Secondary School Festival, where I was named Best Director. This February I will direct Adam Rapp's Red Light Winter, and stage manage CharlesMee's bobrauschenbergamerica in May. After attending multiple productions in and outside of New York, I started to write down things I liked and disliked. This began as an exercise to help my directing, but has evolved into something I enjoy. I have never considered myself to be a great writer, but this is something I think I could be good at.  Through this workshop I hope to begin developing and working on the technique of writing critiques.

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Valerie Gibbs: I am currently a junior theater major at James Madison University. I have been interested in theater practically my entire life, but most of my interest was in the performing aspect of it all. It was not until college that I started exploring the other aspects as well.  In college, we have to write papers on the various shows we see, and through the now two-and-a-half years of doing this, I have gained a greater appreciation for theatrical critiques. I have never been extremely confident in my writing capabilities, but I have improved and I want to continue learning how to master this trade. One of my professors suggested the Critics Institute at KCACTF to me, and upon further thought, I decided it would be a great learning experience. It might be tough for me at times, but I am definitely up for the challenge.

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Peter Starr Northrop is a Memphis-born, Pennsylvania-based writer with no style and an awkward sense of humor to match. He is currently a junior at Elizabethtown College, where he is frantically throwing together a double-major in English and theater. Mostly he divides his time between working as the head features editor for his school newspaper--The Etownian, heading the writers of a sketch comedy group, and attending the occasional class. When it comes to theater, Peter has recently stuck to the directing side of things. He just wrapped up a production of David Ives' English made Simple and is currently assistant-directing Elizabethtown College's production of Five Women Wearing the Same Dress.


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Nathan Taylor is a junior at James Madison University, currently working on a double major in theater and English. He has been involved with theater since he was a young boy, appearing in several shows in the Washington D.C. area during his childhood. It was not long before Nathan realized that he had to be involved in some facet of theater for the rest of his life. Coincidentally, he has also been involved with the English language since he was a young boy, attending elementary school and learning the alphabet during his childhood. It was not long before Nathan realized that he had to both be able to speak and read the English language if he was going to be successful in his adulthood. With the love of both writing and watching a production, he naturally has a passion for critiquing shows of all types.


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Barbara Toperzer: I first became involved with the theater at the age of two as a baby in The King and I. The trauma of the experience meant that I've not been on the stage much since, but it seems like I just can't get away from it completely, no matter how hard I try to pretend I want nothing to do with it. I've been involved on the edges of the theater at McDaniel College since my freshman year, mostly by helping out with tech and somehow always ending up in housing with theater people. I have a huge respect for the process and everything that goes into it, and I do love to watch live theater whenever I can. Learning to do reviews seems like a great way to combine my love of theater with my love of writing. 

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Kelly Wetherald: I am a junior musical theater major and nonprofit studies minor at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, VA. I got involved with theatre in eighth grade and my passion for the arts has grown exponentially from there. Over the past few years at JMU I have explored multiple aspects of theater including performance, directing and criticism. With support from my parents and professors, I have learned that there are a variety of ways to express one's creativity in the realm of theatre. Theatrical criticism is honestly a foreign avenue for me, but I think that my love for the written word as well as my passion for theater will blossom with this program. I look forward to exploring and improving my criticism skills as well as opening up new possibilities for the future. 

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Meredith Young: I'm a senior theater major at James Madison University. My life of crime started about 10 years ago in community theater productions. I loved performing, so I decided to parlay that enthusiasm into a bachelor's degree. At JMU, I got involved with other production areas like costuming and directing until landing in nerd heaven with dramaturgy. One of my favorite things about experiencing a show is listening to others discuss it and piece together meanings for themselves. Theater criticism affords me the opportunity to be a part of that dialogue. I could talk about a show until the cows come home, but as I understand it, the difficulty lies in having the vocabulary to do more than slam or laud (as well as in finding a balance between reviewing and analyzing). This puts the onus on a critic to be as informed as possible. I look forward to stretching and learning at KCACTF this year.

A few of the students haven't sent their bios yet, so if they show up on registration day, you'll meet them too. Hopefully, you'll also show up on registration day and throughout the festival to check in with our participants, chart their progress, scan the multiple platforms we'll be using, and help us pick a winner. 
January 10, 2010 10:09 PM | | Comments (1)
Thumbnail image for 500full-irene-ryan.jpgNext week marks the start of Region II's Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF), and with it comes the convergence of hundreds of drama students on Indiana University of Pennsylvania's (IUP) campus. Plenty of actors, directors and writers saw their first moments of glory at this festival--say auditioning for (or even better, winning) an Irene Ryan Award (that's Ryan at left, as "The Beverly Hillbillies'" Granny), maybe making it to the big event in D.C. The shows chosen to participate in the festival represent the finest college productions in each region, and this year they range from the delightful and much-lauded A Year with Frog and Toad, performed by IUP, to SHOT!, Temple University's follow-up to In Conflict, its successful original docu-drama about the Iraq War.

But just as every ocean liner collects barnacles, so the KCACTF arrives with a little something called the O'Neill Critics Institute (OCI) attached to its underside. The OCI, like the festival's other segments, awards one outstanding writer not only a trip to the Kennedy Center shebang, but also a spot at the two-week-long summer Eugene O'Neill Critics Institute

I taught at KCACTF's OCI last year, when it was held at Philly's UArts (acronyms, anyone?). In order to get the students used to having their work read by an audience of strangers, I posted their reviews here, (scroll to the bottom) and ran the thing reality-competition-style, like a really boring version of "Project Runway," with a proscenium standing in for the runway and laser focus standing in for bitching and backbiting. (Where were the divas? The slackers? Damned well-behaved, hard-working kids!) 

This year, we're at it again, but stepping the action up a notch. It's just not fair to send these babes into the woods with old-school bread crumbs, because the woods have been clearcut, and home, it seems, is wherever you hang your RSS feed. I hope to arm them with a GPS and some of the tools they'll need to set up their own shops out there in the ether. 

Please comment on their work, offer suggestions, help us pick a winner, and let them know people still care deeply about theater criticism. Love critics? Great, tell them why. Hate critics? Tell them why. Indifferent? Tell them how they can convince you. Assuming all deadlines are met (lesson #1), you'll see the students here on Monday and every day after that until January 16, when everyone's still a critic, but only one gets the comp.


January 5, 2010 10:05 PM | | Comments (0)
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