Results tagged “act ii playhouse” from Drama Queen

I preface this entry by saying that aside from being elected the first African-American president, there is probably no greater feat in my mind than pulling off a one-person show. It takes such chutzpah that even the act of not completely pulling it off is still a triumph of the spirit, of the timeless human drive to make meaning of our lives, to show that among the millions of people across several millenia who have lived and died, this story also matters. And that's a noble effort, indeed.

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But when all things are equal, as they mostly are in the following two reviews of recent one-person shows, what makes one float and the other take on water? In the case of Tony Braithwaite's Look Mom, I'm Swell vs. Judy Gold's 25 Questions for a Jewish Mother, there are plenty of parallels. Both shows, obviously, explore their creators' relationships with their mothers. Both grew up as awkward, drama-loving outsiders. Both use impressions in their act, I guess to diffuse the cumulative effect of watching one person talk about him/herself for an hour-and-a-half. And both were professional pieces performed in major area houses (Gold's house was a bit more major than Braithwaite's but I suppose major is in the eye of the beholder anyway). So why did I like one so much more than the other?

I guess the difference here is partly due to the intangible charisma factor--Braithwaite is just slightly more humble and self-effacing--but I think it also helps that he's just plain more honest about what he's trying to achieve. Tony Braithwaite wants to talk about Tony Braithwaite, pure and simple, and in this honest (internal) declaration, he makes it his business to convince the audience he's worth watching. Gold is less honest about her goals, and though what she really wants to discuss is her relationship with her mother, she builds a complicated structure that not only distracts from her own story, but might just have been a better idea on its own. Or at least an entirely worthwhile--but separate idea. If someone invites you over for a dinner party and during the hors d'oeuvres whips out their Amway catalogue (or whatever Jewish women sell, say, Pampered Chef housewares), you're going to spend the rest of the evening feeling at least a little taken aback. Gold isn't selling Amway with her act, but it's not exactly the dinner party she promised, either.

Anyway, you can judge for yourself. Here's my review of Tony Braithwaite's Look Mom, I'm Swell. Here's my review of Judy Gold's 25 Questions for a Jewish Mother. Both are from the Philadelphia Inquirer.

December 16, 2008 12:44 PM | | Comments (4)
One of the best things about being a reviewer is watching new talent grow. The worst? Losing them. Every once in a while an actor comes along who makes you think, "Okay, I'll be watching him/her a whole lot over the next few years--if they stay." As every regional theater hub besides, maybe, Chicago can attest (and probably Chicago too), that's the problem with not being New York or L.A. 

If you ask some of the fine actors who have made Philly their home why they stayed, they all give the same reasons: there's enough quality work to be had, and they can buy a house and raise a family here on an actor's pay. Not too shabby.

But who can blame the ones that go? Actors don't get into this because they have dreams of becoming Philly-famous. There are some exciting new faces in Philadelphia theater this year--as local drama schools have been turning out top shelf talent at a rate I haven't seen before--but since raising a family and buying an affordable house probably isn't at the top of their list of priorities just yet, who knows if they plan to stick around?

I, for one, will cross my fingers and hope that if they leave, they don't drown in the CSI franchise's lower depths. And if they stay? Well, Fishtown and the Italian Market are a whole lot cheaper than Brooklyn, a Barrymore is a lot more accessible than a Tony, and If you take SEPTA to Trenton and pick up NJ Transit, it's like, what, 20 bucks total to get to Penn Station? I'm just saying.

This season, there have been a couple of young'uns who made my job really, really easy. Here's one of them in my review of Magnetic North from Monday's Inquirer
October 29, 2008 8:59 AM | | Comments (6)
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