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MODERN ART NOTES
Tyler Green's modern and contemporary art blog



    December 16-31, 2002

    12.31.2002

    Aside from Drawings Now and Vija Celmins, if anyone has NYC shows you think I shouldn't miss when I'm in NYC on Friday, please comment board 'em!

    12.30.2002

    Just the other day MAN and the MANbabe were discussing how there appeared to be a lot of recent attention on Vietnam. Given that we're in DC the impetus for the conversation was the Vietnam: Now and Then show at Hemphill. Other recent (and upcoming) Vietnam shows at museums and galleries worldwide include:

    * Under Fire: Images From Vietnam @ LA's Piece Unique Gallery. Here's a feature story from the LA Times. (Funny, I didn't see a feature about the Hemphill show in the Washington Post...)

    * Vietnam Behind the Lines @ The British Museum.

    * Vietnam: Journeys of Body, Mind and Spirit @ NYC's American Museum of Natural History.

    * VietnamArtBooks.com


    Admin update: Apologies about the speed (or lack thereof) of the message boards of late. I hope it improves soon or I'll look into switching again.


    This is the official MAN press release of the month. Here's a tease: "Akron will be just a little like Paris when..."


    The Washington Post should be completely embarassed by Sunday's Arts section (not yet online). The big lead story? An article on reality TV. What does that have to do with the arts? (Meanwhile, important and quality shows such as those now at Hemphill, Fusebox/Swedish Embassy, G, etc. go mostly uncovered by the Style/Arts section.)

    I just about needed Zantac after all of those ten best lists on Sunday. Here's the better idea: the LA Times did an arts 'people to watch in 2003' set of lists. Here's Christopher Knight's.

    12.27.2002

    Speaking of Dan Steinhilber, Post Weekend arts critic Michael O'Sullivan includes him on his 2002 Top Ten list. It would have been nice if O'Sullivan had called Art Basel Miami Beach by its actual name though. Just another example of the myopia of the DC arts scene -- a WP critic can't accurately name 2002's broadest display of DC-bred contemporary art.


    Imagine my joy, my glee, my pride at being described in this week’s CityPaper as one of Art-O-Matic’s “most outspoken opponents.” Glenn Dixon, who writes about the visual arts and more for CP, was kind enough to use my Washington Post letter as part of his diatribe against the sub-mediocrity that was AOM (which was part of his year-in-review). I’m rather flattered. Bonus points to Glenn for mentioning MAN.

    Glenn pointed out something else I figure I should get around to addressing: he describes me as a “Fusebox partisan.” Given that about half the letters I received in response to the Post letter (which seems to be getting much more attention than I ever would have guessed) accused me of same, I suppose I should describe how I think of myself in regards to Fusebox and other local spaces/artists.

    A word on favorites and preferences: having them is not a bad thing. One of the themes in the AOM letters I received (25 was the final count and that doesn’t include the dirty looks I got in the city’s artsy bars) was that all visual arts should be appreciated equally, that there was something “wrong” in picking out favorites and in singling out some work as particularly good or in singling out other work as particularly atrocious. This is complete, total, and utter horsecrap. Guess what: Gerhard Richter’s work is better than Jason Gubbiotti’s. Pipilotti Rist’s work is better than Susan Smith-Pinelo’s. If viewers and critics don’t differentiate then what’s the point of growing and maturing as an artist?

    Fusebox is my favorite local gallery and it should be. It has the most ambitious, earnest and aggressive contemporary arts program of any DC gallery. It is committed to supporting and promoting local artists at home and in NYC, Europe and beyond. Did you see G at Art Basel Miami Beach? Hemphill? Numark? Conner? Nope. Only Fusebox’s owners and crue were willing to go without sleep for most of a week just to have the opportunity to share DC artists with the world. (Side note: David Adamson wasn’t at Miami either, but I hear local artists talk SO much about how he helps them out that he’s not in this group.) Fusebox deserves all the credit (Glenn Dixon and) I can give them for having a vision that has its stable of artists at its core. While I cop to being a Fusebox partisan, I haven’t been shy about calling out shows I don’t like: recent solos of Vincent Szarek and Siemon Allen are two good examples.

    That’s not to say I’m not a fan of other galleries. Truth be told I’d probably describe myself as a Conner and Hemphill partisan too. Two of DC’s best shows of the year were at Conner: DC old-schooler Tom Downing and NYC new-schooler Leo Villareal. Hemphill Fine Arts deserves oodles of credit for having a program that goes beyond the art they hang on their walls. Hemphill’s symposium/speaker series is a model for other local galleries to follow. (Or it would be if any of them paid attention to it – I didn’t see any other local gallery owners at the tear-provoking Vietnam panel a couple weeks back.) Could I be a bigger Conner or Hemphill partisan? Sure. Conner doesn’t spend much time on local contemporary artists. I find it somewhat unfortunate that the last three shows to feature Colby Caldwell have all been at Hemphill – is the gallery working to spread the Caldwell gospel beyond Georgetown?

    And I think I’m pretty good at spotlighting local artists I like, regardless of gallery. Maggie Michael (G Fine Art) has gotten lots of pixels here, as has Signal 66/Gallery Four’s Dan Steinhilber (look for a MANessay on Steinhilber sometime in the next few days).

    One last note: I know pretty much all of the people I mention on this website. DC’s arts community is of such a size that everyone knows everyone. I wouldn’t say anything here that I wouldn’t discuss with them over a drink. I love it when people walk up to me at the Blue Room or at Greenwood and challenge me over something I’ve written here. I have comment boards here so people can take shots at me if they so choose. Over the next week I’m sure I’ll see Leigh Conner or George Hemphill somewhere in town. I’d love it if they took issue with something I wrote here. And I bet they will.


    Prediction: The GuggEnron will announce a Herb Ritts retro sometime in the next six weeks.

    12.26.2002

    Someone calls this collecting. I call it collecting as list-making.


    The LA Times has a stunning account (especially if you read between the lines) of how LACMA went from launching a $400 million campaign to rebuild itself as a Koolhaus Destination Museum to giving up 364 days later. The headline should have been, 'From Zero to Zero in 364 Days.'

    The piece reveals that on the day LACMA decided to move forward with the project, only 23 of the 50 trustees were present. Left unsaid in the story: not only did a minority of LACMA trustees commit the institution to a $400 million campaign, but probably only about a third of the trustees were on board. Also clear from the story: There was no fundraising plan. LACMA made it up as they went along.




    From the Thoroughly Odd Confluence Dept.: Jeffrey Binstock, brother of Corcoran curator Jonathan Binstock, reviews the Corcoran Biennial for artnet.com. Oh, by the way, Jo. Binstock curated the Corcoran show and Je. Binstock is the COO of artnet.com. Not surprisingly, the 'review' reads as a promo piece, which I think does neither artnet nor the Corcoran any favors.

    Witness one odd section: Je. Binstock defines the show's combining of "theater, video, technology, art and craft" as a theme. No, that's what's in the show, medium alone does not a show make.

    12.24.2002

    In case it wasn't obvious from yesterday's activity, MAN is on Christmas break. Back on Thursday.

    12.23.2002

    ArtsJournal has links to three or four great art theft stories. Guilty pleasure. (Memo to self: bad choice of words.)

    12.22.2002

    Sunday Highlights:

    * It's in the guise of a year-end Top Ten, but Christopher Knight goes off on LA-area museum trustees for their lack of vision and commitment. That's two or three times the LAT has gone after area cultural boards in recent weeks. Love it.

    * Blake Gopnik praises some artists but questions (big time) a curator in his review of the Corcoran Biennial. (Nota bene: For reasons not at all clear, the Corcoran review isn't on the Post website. Here's the Sunday Arts front -- maybe the Post will add the review on Monday.) As I read the piece with a friend this morning, we were both surprised by the tone, but couldn't find anything with which to disagree. Gopnik returns to his game after his puzzling, virtually sex-free Cecily Brown review.

    * Christine Temin examines the Wolfgang Tillmans exhibition @ Harvard's Busch Reisinger Museum in the Boston Globe.

    * Wanna know what it's like to premiere a film @ a MOMA film festival? Greg Allen's weekend posts are a better look at an opening than the vapid Laurel Nakadate was able to churn out for much-admired ArtKrush.


    Everyone does top ten lists because they're easy. But I always enjoy reading them, so I thought I'd do one of my own. In no particular order, the top ten art bits of the year:

    1.) The Richter retro @ MOMA: Despite an occasionally clumsy installation (perhaps because of MOMA's remodeling/expansion), the show confirmed that Richter is in the upper echelon of the 20th century pantheon.

    2.) The Newman retro @ Philly: Everything about this show was beautiful... except the attendance numbers.

    3.) Art Basel Miami Beach: For me it was the most enjoyable four days of art of the entire year. I think that the quality and depth of what was on display (and for sale) in Miami surprised most of us.

    4.) Urgent Painting @ the Paris City Museum of Modern Art: People who like to talk about the death of painting must not be going to shows such as this or...

    5.) Drawing @ MOMA: OK, confession: I won't see the show for a couple of weeks. But I've paged through the catalog and it's refreshing to see people get so exhuasted with the umpteenth video installation that some artists have returned to making art by hand.

    6.) The NYT's Sunday Magazine on Rebuilding Ground Zero: The NYT put the Lower Manhattan Development Corp. to shame and paid a key role in sparing us from a crony-dominated boondoggle.

    7.) Bonnard @ the Phillips: This is a beautiful show in the traditional sense. Beauty dominates. But for those willing to look deeper and work harder, there's much more to enjoy here.

    8.) The Barnes Escape: The decision by the Barnes Foundation to flee a bad situation is both bold and overdue.

    9.) Tadao Ando comes back to the US: In 2001 Ando's first public building in the US -- the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts in St. Louis opened. This year Ando's Fort Worth Museum of Modern Art expansion opened. I'm going in March.

    10.) Jason Falchook, Gently Scratching a Trajectory @ DC's Fusebox: Disclaimers galore: I didn't see as many NYC gallery shows as usual this year because I spent February through July traveling my butt off. So I'm sure I missed some shows in NYC that deserve mentioning. Falchook's show was the best show I saw in DC this year. Discussed previously.

    12.20.2002

    It's MAN's First Art World Christmas Wish List!

    For Thomas Krens: A Frank Gehry-designed silver parachute out of his job.
    For the National Gallery of Art: A Robert Ryman retro.
    For Gregory Crewdson: Fewer celebrities.
    For Catherine Opie: A mid-career retro at SF MOMA.
    For Fusebox: The first major museum show of one of their artists.
    For the Hirshhorn: An exhibition endowment that would provide $3M a year.
    For middle America: Increased recognition for some its art spaces. I'm thinking primarily about the Wexner, the Pulitzer, the Kemper, the Birmingham Art Museum, and the Walker.
    For DC galleries and artists: More DC writers placing more reviews of DC shows -- both praising and critical -- in art magazines.
    For MAN: Catherine Opie's 'O' portfolio.
    For MAN, Part II: A sense of reality!
    For MOMA: The money to keep MOMA QNS open as an exhibition space after MOMA moves back to Manhattan.

    More to come... or post your own on the comment boards!



    Five Things is new. James Huckenpahler had some nice things to say about my Art Basel Miami Beach writings here, so I thought I'd provide some E-Z links:

    Overview Thoughts
    The Main Fair, Part One
    The Main Fair, Part Two
    artpoint & the Containers
    Margulies & Rubell Collections: Soon to come.

    12.19.2002

    Good dirt about what sold, who sold and for how much at Miami Basel.


    Forget newspaper accounts of yesterday's WTC site architectural unveiling yesterday (though Benjamin Forgey's is an easy read), just go right to MANpal Greg Allen, who was on the scene and even has pictures.


    MAN has been quiet in the last day or two because of a high and sudden workload and because every once and a while it's good to bask in the joie de vivre. We're back, and so is ArtKrush!

    Hilton Kramer says that the Guggenheim should can Thomas Krens. Someone should give Hilty Peter Lewis' phone number.

    12.18.2002

    ArtKrush appears to be down. Anyone have news? Comment boards, please, if you do!


    Sorry, my real job is temporarily overwhelming. Posting resumes Thursday.

    12.17.2002

    Greg Allen, keeper of MANfave greg.org, has a film showing at the MOMA Documentary Fortnight. Here's the info:

    What: Souvenir (November 2001) is written and directed by Gregory Allen. It features the screen debut of performer Rebecca Chamberlain, cinematography by photographer/video/installation artist Jonah Freeman. The associate producer is Alice Bertay and international production was handled by Thomas Bertay and Sycomore
    Films, Paris. Souvenir (November 2001) will screen in a program of four Septmember 11-related films, which also includes works by directors Kristin Lucas, Etienne Sauret, and Norman Cowie. The entire running time is 62 minutes.

    When: Thursday, Dec. 19, @ 2pm.

    Where: MoMA @ Gramercy Theater, 127 East 23rd Street (Lexington Ave.), NYC.

    How: Contact MoMA @ 212-708-9480 or www.moma.org for ticket and schedule information.


    Miami is considering inviting the Whitney to open a branch in their fair city. This has been whispered for a while, but it made it into the Miami Herald this morning. Most interesting to me is that the mayor of Miami is taking a personal interest in bring more arts-related projects (and tourism) to his city. (He probably astutely noticed that the attendance at Basel is being reported as double what organizers were expecting.) So that's one American mayor who is prioritizing the arts, what about the rest?


    The New Yorker jumps on the Tadao Ando in Fort Worth bandwagon.

    12.16.2002

    The Corcoran Gallery of Art's Homeland show will feature MANfave Jason Falchook. The website is up and the invites are out. Jan. 2 is the opening night.


    LA Times arts writer (writer, not critic) Suzanne Muchnic has a good look at the somewhat surprising success of the Getty. Naturally I find nothing wrong with their being an elitist temple to art up on an elitist hill, but elitism is a dirty word.

    I was at the Getty about a year ago. Muchnic misses one thing: overall, the collection is pretty average but does have some great pieces.


    MAN hears that the Sarah Whitfield Bonnard lecture @ the Phillips has been cancelled due to family reasons.
    posted by mclennan @ Tuesday, December 31, 2002 | Permanent link

    December 1-15, 2002

    12.13.2002

    Back to the Miami Basel!

    First, I left the Inter.play catalog at a friend's house so those thoughts will have to wait. Let's start with artpoint. I apologize in advance for the sketchiness of some of these thoughts but there were generally fewer works by each artist in the non-fair spaces than in the fair.

    As the only explicitly commercial gallery in the space, it's probably not a big surprise that Fusebox's offerings were the most mature at artpoint. I've written a good bit about Fusebox's artpoint space so I'll move on to...

    * ... Dan Steinhilber's work shown by Baltimore's Gallery Four. Steinhilber's work, which got attention in artnet this week, was similar to work currently on display at DC's Signal 66. The coathanger sculpture in Miami, however, was more tornadic and energy-infused. It may have been the most arresting piece on artpoint's third floor.

    The other two noteworthy spaces @ artpoint were Phoenix's LoDo and Minnesota's Soap Factory.

    * LoDo featured the work of Jon Haddock (whose 2000 show at the Arizona State University Art Museum can be seen here). Haddock displayed eight small acrylic drawings on panels, each of a surreal moment that mixes pop culture references. One featured Shaggy and Velma from Scooby Doo being held at gunpoint by Scully and Mulder of X-Files fame. The representations are clever, knowing and are just far away from cartoonish to work.


    * At Soap Factory, Harvey Opgenorth's (again, apologies on the previous misspelling) photos were a good example of the honest, non-ironic humor that permeated much of the artpoint space. Opgenorth wore clothing that closely matched a famous work of art and then was photographed standing in front of it. Picture him wearing a t-shirt and pants that closely match a Rothko behind him. Or an Ellsworth Kelly.

    Also at Soap Factory, Kirk McCall's Proposal for a Girlfriend, rendered as a series of architectural blueprints hanging on the wall, was another good example of the cheeky humor throughout artpoint.

    The exhibition space closest in spirit to artpoint was the Art Positions show, more popularly known as the Containers. This was a grouping of 20 shipping containers set up on the beach by the Basel folk, rented out to 20 galleries for $5000 each. Basel made much of these containers being a juried place for younger, up-and-coming galleries to be seen, but the main show was also juried and the per-square-foot price for the main show and the shipping containers was almost the same.

    * Daniel Roth's large-format drawing (@ Germany's Meyer-Riegger Galerie) showed a gnarled, stark, bare forest that contained dark and intriguing surprises. Perhaps as a response to the prevalence of video, installations, etc. in contemporary art in recent years, drawing and more hand-borne artwork seemed to be making a comeback at Basel. Hooray.

    Roth has an exhibit up now at Meyer-Riegger and the JPEGs of the images aren't great, but they're better than nothing.

    * Jonathan Monk's primitive film (also @ Meyer-Riegger) shows a film loop of pieces of A4 paper with a circle drawn on them. The paper and the circle are different, solid colors. As the film rolls, the colors and circles dance around in an oddly engaging way. Not only are the images projected, but they're easy to see on the film as it feeds through the projector. Monk's work is simple and almost minimalist, but with a clever nod to art history and the details of better-known works.

    * Simon Evans' drawings/collages of life events (@ Jack Hanley)and circumstances have more in common with New Yorker cartoons than with artists such as Twombly, but the mixed lineage is evident. One written-word collage is entitled Diagram of Love (featuring a colored bar chart and hand-written notes and explanations) and another is All That's Wrong With Sex. Another piece, The Universe, is a skychart with some... new constellations drawn out (such as The Ripped Rubber). I can't find any links to Evans, but if a MANreader can, please post.


    Yesterday I had a conversation with a friend about how we feel lucky if one or two shows a year leave us weak in the knees. Here are my knee-wobblers for the year and my near-knee-wobblers:

    Knee-Wobblers: Richter @ MOMA, Newman @ Philly.

    Near Knee-Wobblers: Urgent Painting @ Museum of Modern Art of the City of Paris, Bonnard @ Phillips.


    On the intellectual heels of the Hirshhorn's Open Cities exhibit (featuring photography of... cities!), the Orlando Museum of Art is hosting a diametrical exhibition: staged photography, a la Crewdson, Wall, Simmons, etc. They're calling it Constructed Realities. It opens next March and it might just be enough to get me down to that child-infested part of Florida.


    So far no comments from anyone on the Miami Basel posts. I can tell from my hit stats that some of those artists are driving traffic and that some of the artpoint crowd have been checking out the site. I'd love some comments, agreements, disagreements on what I've posted so far, so use the comment board under this post. More later today... I promise to stay undistracted til 6.

    12.12.2002

    I lied. Next Basel installment on Friday.


    The Museum of Modern Art of Fort Worth celebrates its new building by publishing a book of seven interviews with architect Tadao Ando. Must-own.


    A WSJ rehash of the mess at the GuggEnron.

    12.11.2002

    Yesterday I left off about halfway through the Art Basel Miami Beach main fair. Today I’ll finish it up.

    * Jana Sterbak’s photographs (@ Spain’s Galerie Toni Tapies) of realistic chairs made of ice that had been broken apart, ostensibly by human action. How were they made? How were they destroyed?

    * Xiaoze Xie's paintings (@ Charles Cowles) of newspapers, permanent, painterly manifestations of a daily disposable. Time is static in Xie's paintings but a stack of papers implies days and weeks moving by.

    * Chiho Aoshima's mural (@ Paris' Emmanuel Perrotin) that filed an entire 12X12 wall. Colorful and moving beyond superflat, Aoshima's mural finally moves his cloying adolescent girls beyond puberty. He pours them into bikinis, puts them in cars with boys, inevitably resulting in car crashes. Springsteen after Born to Run and before Darkness on the Edge of Town.

    * Naoya Hatakeyama's photographs (@ Germany's LA Galerie) of moments of drama such as falling rock. Hatakeyama's (apologies for the misspelling in a post from Miami Beach) lit-tunnel photographs also fascinate me. So often in photography we identify the light source as coming from outside the frame, outside the presented image. Hatakeyama turns that photographic assumption around by placing his artifical light source near the middle of his photographs. The result is an image that has an unusual level of possibility: is someone approaching? what could I see with a little more light? The reflections in the water almost deceive the viewer into thinking that Hatakeyama has created a photographic set. (He hasn't.)

    * Sven Pahlsson's architecturally rendered video (@ Brownstone) leads the viewer on a repeating ride through a bland computerized neighborhood, complete with soundtrack. The images fall fascinatingly short of banal in the same way a 20-year subdivision just misses banality: there is just enough post-consumer variation to give the neighborhood a hint of discontinuity. His work will be featured in a group show at the Corcoran later this winter. Note: the first link in this paragraph loads slowly but is worth it.

    * Brend & Hilla Becher's watertowers (@ Gladstone) are images I've seen before, but they're just so statuesque and so filled with presence that they're a delight to look at.

    * Ann Lislegaard's photographs (@ Spain's Galeria Elba Benitez) are Falchookian in that they feature layers of depth within the image. In the foreground is a window covered with drops of rain. (It's the fourth image.) In the distance, three opquely discernable layers of buildings recede from the window and each other, finally yielding into sky. There were a lot of rain-covered windows photographs in Miami (including a set by Hatakeyama), but Lislegaard's were the best.

    Tomorrow night (no earlier than 9pm): the non-fair spaces.


    The LA Times has had a number of fascinating stories over the last couple days. To herald the opening of the new Tadao Ando-designed Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, they provide both an architecture review of the building and a review of the art in the building and its presentation.

    An LA Times magazine writer had lunch with Dave Hickey.

    Also, two major galleries in two of America's top four art cities both have photo exhibits that look back at Vietnam. Hemphill Fine Arts in Georgetown has one exhibit and the LA Times discusses another exhibit in LA.

    In related news, ArtsJournal is live with a re-design.

    12.10.2002

    Miami Basel (continued): The Main Fair

    In yesterday’s post I touched on some of the big picture things I/we noticed. Keeping with the (hopefully) easy-to-read-and-digest notes format, today I’ll begin to focus on the main fair. Tomorrow I’ll finish up the main fair. Later in the week/weekend I’ll discuss Inter.play, artpoint and the containers show (aka Art Positions, for some reason unclear to me) and the day after that I’ll discuss the Margulies and Rubell collections.

    Quick clarification: The containers were not offered to the 20 galleries for free. The galleries in the containers, which were invited by Art Basel, paid $5,000 for their space. I know that the main fair was $34 per square foot, for an average of $25,000 per gallery. I would guess that the container space came out to near $34/square foot.
    On to the fair!

    * Artists whose work I didn’t see: Ryman, Marden, Park, Bischoff, Celmins. (To be fair, many dealers changed up their displays daily. I was in the hall for walk-throughs on Thursday and Sunday and did a thorough look on Friday.)

    * Artists of whose work I saw too much of: Struth, Ruff, Sarmento, Halley.

    * Artist whose work was everywhere and held up: Neshat.

    I enjoyed being introduced to lots of artists, especially @ the booths of galleries that are outside the US. Some individual shout-outs:

    * Edward Burtynsky’s three photographs (@ Charles Cowles) of the impact of the energy industry on nature. One work featured an oil or gas pipeline running through a forest, another featured a refugee camp-style mess of oil derricks on an arid plain. In the current political climate it’s hard not to view Burtynsky’s work as political, as near-documentary evidence of man’s ability to impact a landscape. However Burtynsky presents his images so neutrally that if we were under a Gore Administration I’m not sure I’d think about them that way. The pipeline cutting through the forest is almost beautiful. The image of an oil tanker is taken from the ground, looking up at the ship in admiration. Burtynsky’s work doesn’t so much reveal scars as much as it simply reveals.

    * William Cordova’s drawings (@ Ambrosino and in the Inter.play exhibit) are not much bigger than a 5x7 index card and are full of detail, color and narrative. Cordova’s titles are sly hints that not only explain the works but are part of them (they’re written in pencil at the bottom of each work).

    * Catherine Yass’ photos and videos (@ aspreyjacques) are painterly, lush and create new ways of seeing. Her video Descent was the best video work of the fair. Yass went up an 800-foot crane on a foggy London morning, hung the camera upside down, and slowly descended. Throughout the descent, her camera remains steady: on the left there’s a building under construction with 18-20 feet per floor, on the right there’s a building under construction with 9-12 feet per floor. The viewer knows that the camera is moving past each building at the same speed, but the difference in floor height creates a tension that holds the entire screen together, framing fog, pedestrians and workers in the distance below and the rising, fog-obscured sun. Yass’ two lightboxes featuring photos taken in a similar manner with shutter openings of as long as a second are spectacular. In the video work, Yass makes us see a city by moving through it in a unique way. In the photo work, Yass makes us see a city by holding it still for us in a unique way.

    * Rosangela Renno’s Bookcases wall sculpture (@ Brazil’s Galeria Fortes Vilaca) puts a digital photograph of about 20 books on an acrylic panel that hung at a 90-degree angle from the wall, at eye level (OK, I’m 6-foot-3). Many people have bookcases and books exist in their homes in a passive way, tucked into a wall. Renno’s ‘books’ don’t recede into the wall where they can be ignored until one of them is taken off a shelf. Instead, they protrude into a room, occupying physical space and become a more active part of a room.

    * Sergio Belinchon’s nine-photograph installation of open roads receding into landscapes (@ Spain’s Galeria Luis Adelantado) takes a photo cliché and transforms it into an experiential piece. It seemed like every gallery had a photo series hung in a 3x3 grid, but Belinchon’s is one of the few grid installations that had a reason for being a grid installation. The nine roads and landscapes are transportive, inviting and promising, ultimately pulling the viewer’s thoughts beyond the room. His other work explores architecture, synthetic construction and form in images that I prefer to Struth's.

    More tomorrow!



    The world's major museums decide not to return artifacts. The Chinese government seems to have begun a program to purchase Chinese artifacts and art in an effort to recover national treasures.


    Next Basel post to come this afternoon. In the meantime, a few interesting big-picture art stories from around the web:

    *The LA Times' architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff eviscerates the LACMA board and its donors for failing to move forward on their new space. That's cool. (At ArtKrush, Christopher Elam nails it too: "cold feet.")

    * The SF Chronicle makes the case for SF moving toward becoming America's Second City of the arts. Here's the discussion of SF MOMA. The second story is the thorough one.

    * Laurel Nakadate's diary @ ArtKrush is over. (Use the AK link I gave above -- for some reason Blogger isn't letting me reprise it here.) I love AK and I love the idea, but Nakadate's narcissism doesn't thrill me. I referred to her as an American Emin last week. Sam Taylor-Wood would have been a less stupid comparison.


    The LA Times has the only coherent Basel wrap-up story I've read or heard.

    12.9.2002

    Why hasn't the Washington Post done the DC version of this story?

    P.S. The LoDo space was one of the best at artpoint.


    From the cool arguments department: The Washington Post printed a letter in response to my letter to the editor from a week ago.

    I'm thrilled the letter ran, but I never said that AOM cheapens the quality of art in DC. Not even close. Still, I agree with Ms. Ruppert on one point: it would be cool if people who went to AOM used it as their gateway to (better) visual arts events and shows in DC.


    MAN’s intent was to do a post each day from Art Basel Miami Beach. However, a bevy of, er, distractions managed to scuttle that plan. Aside from the sheer density of the schedule (art viewing at three different locations on South Beach and several others all over greater Miami), MAN had lots of other things to see and do. These included fine meals, fine libations and exceptionally fine time spent with MANpals. Sure the art rocked, but the MANpals were the highlight of the trip. Getting to spend 15 hours a day (or more) around cool people and cool art is about as good as it gets.

    So MAN is finally catching up. Because it’s hard to find web links to artists and galleries @ 37,000 feet, I’ll start with a thematic overview today and I’ll talk more about specific artists and spaces tomorrow and Wednesday. As is often the case, I’m flagrantly stealing the good thoughts of those with whom I gallery-gazed. They kick ass.

    * For decades the female nude and breasts have been more featured in contemporary art than penises. By contrast, Basel was a phallus-fest. MAN looks forward to reading an essay on how the penis is superceding breasts as central to much contemporary art. Furthermore, work by female artists claiming the female form their own continues to impress, notably Yuskavage, Naomi Fisher and others I’ll have to talk about tomorrow.

    * As a backlash against years of stand-offish installation art, video work as much about technology as about creativity and the assembly line approaches of Koons and Halley, the personal presence of the artist is returning. In the main fair hall hands-on works such as drawings received a surprising amount of wall space (a surprise because you’d expect a $45K painting to receive first crack at wall space over a $7K drawing). In the up-and-comer spaces where promising mostly 20something artists were on display, this was more evident, perhaps indicating that a Kant-ian antithesis to installation/video/tech is underway.

    The best examples of this: the independently curated (but Basel-sanctioned) artpoint show, the Basel-created Art Positions show (which was shown in 20 shipping containers on the beach) and to a lesser extent the Inter.play show, which was in the Design District. As part of MAN’s ongoing effort to take a whack at more thoughtful art writing and not just an art noting, MAN will attempt to discuss this trend in semi-essay form later this week.

    * As I rabble-roused a week or so ago, Miami Basel was an exciting place to see what’s new in contemporary art created by DC-area artists. The show highlighted the continued emergence of DC-based artists and featured several indications that work from DC artists will be flowing out of DC and into NYC and curated contemporary art spaces around the country. At this rate it will become a bigger and bigger embarrassment to DC’s arts scene that we have no ICA/MOCA space to show local artists. Perhaps when DC realizes that you have to go to New York or Massachusetts or Minneapolis to see shows by DC artists that will change.

    Two DC-based artists created new work for the show. Fuseboxian Jason Gubbiotti’s so-called ‘corner painting’ was the most inventive painting on display at any of the up-and-coming spaces. The painting’s stretcher is built out both along the gallery wall and at a right angle from it, resulting in the painting being stretched into a 90-degree curve. Look for it in the Situation Room show that opens @ St. Mary’s College during the third weekend of January and a more thorough discussion of the work in the show catalog.

    Gallery Four-ian Dan Steinhilber (who lives about six blocks from MAN Global HQ) also created some pieces that transformed mundane everyday objects (coat hangers, bubble wrap and more) into elegant compositions. MAN complains oft about bland installations that go to lengths to hide the hand of the artist. Steinhilber’s installations celebrate the way the artist can transform dull, pedestrian objects into something beautiful by discovering potential in the most random materials. Three words: bubble wrap painting.

    On a sad note, DC photographer Jason “Ali” Falchook had gone to Florida well before the Basel show in order to create some new work. The work, his camera and his recent notes about his work were stolen from his hotel room on the second night of the fair. MAN hopes Falchook is back creating again soon.

    12.6.2002

    Greetings from Miami!

    MAN has been having a total blast with the DC crew. Some highlights:

    * The semi-affiliated Inter.play exhibit in the Miami Design Center was much fun. The fair is pretty serious -- money, money, money. Inter.play succeeds at bringing much whimsy into the scene, especially in the video work of Luis Gispert (who was in the Whitney), the precious and precocious drawings of William Cordova, and the eroticism of Fernando Palomar. Even 20-month old Clay (he's the Dan-let Steinhilber and Maggie-let Michael) seemed to enjoy Inter.play.

    * As I mentioned yesterday, artpoint holds up exceptionally well in comparison to the better-known work in the hall. From Gallery Four in Baltimore, Matthew Paulson's cut-up maps were intriguing. Check out LoDo from Phoenix, where Jon Haddock's acrylic drawings on panels mix pop culture references with surrealistic situations. Also notable: Harvey Ongenorth's photos from the Soap Factory, unsigned Miami artist Ivan Toth Depena's painterly iris prints (on watercolor paper!) and the dirty little hands of Michael Salter from Lump. Links to come on Monday night.

    * From the main hall... so much! But quickly... the paintings of Vernon Fisher student Xioze Xie were arresting, as were more drawings from William Cordova (represented by Ambrosino). Perhaps the most beautiful photography and video work in the main show is from Catherine Yass, whose lightboxes imply brushstrokes and whose video work is tense and sculptural. She shows at London's aspreyjacques.

    * Many of the most interesting booths were those of foreign galleries. Of note: Brazil's Galeria Fortes Villaca (especiallyt he work of Rosangela Renno), Sergio Belinchon's work from Spain's Galeria Luis Adelantado, the photography of Naoya Hatakyama @ Germany's LA Galerie, and the recent work by Ann Lislegaard from Spain's Galeria Elba Benitez.

    * Michael Kimmelman hits a home run today on GuggEnron. (I know, it's a cliche but I'm exhuasted!)

    * Links for everything on Monday. Or Google.


    Greetings from Miami!

    MAN has been having a total blast with the DC crew. Some highlights:

    * The semi-affiliated Inter.play exhibit in the Miami Design Center was much fun. The fair is pretty serious -- money, money, money. Inter.play succeeds at bringing much whimsy into the scene, especially in the video work of Luis Gispert (who was in the Whitney), the precious and precocious drawings of William Cordova, and the eroticism of Fernando Palomar. Even 20-month old Clay (he's the Dan-let Steinhilber and Maggie-let Michael) seemed to enjoy Inter.play.

    * As I mentioned yesterday, artpoint holds up exceptionally well in comparison to the better-known work in the hall. From Gallery Four in Baltimore, Matthew Paulson's cut-up maps were intriguing. Check out LoDo from Phoenix, where Jon Haddock's acrylic drawings on panels mix pop culture references with surrealistic situations. Also notable: Harvey Ongenorth's photos from the Soap Factory, unsigned Miami artist Ivan Toth Depena's painterly iris prints (on watercolor paper!) and the dirty little hands of Michael Salter from Lump. Links to come on Monday night.

    * From the main hall... so much! But quickly... the paintings of Vernon Fisher student Xioze Xie were arresting, as were more drawings from William Cordova (represented by Ambrosino). Perhaps the most beautiful photography and video work in the main show is from Catherine Yass, whose lightboxes imply brushstrokes and whose video work is tense and sculptural. She shows at London's aspreyjacques.

    * Many of the most interesting booths were those of foreign galleries. Of note: Brazil's Galeria Fortes Villaca (especiallyt he work of Rosangela Renno), Sergio Belinchon's work from Spain's Galeria Luis Adelantado, the photography of Naoya Hatakyama @ Germany's LA Galerie, and the recent work by Ann Lislegaard from Spain's Galeria Elba Benitez.

    * Michael Kimmelman hits a home run today on GuggEnron. (I know, it's a cliche but I'm exhuasted!)

    * Links for everything on Monday. Or Google.


    Greetings from Miami!

    MAN has been having a total blast with the DC crew. Some highlights:

    * The semi-affiliated Inter.play exhibit in the Miami Design Center was much fun. The fair is pretty serious -- money, money, money. Inter.play succeeds at bringing much whimsy into the scene, especially in the video work of Luis Gispert (who was in the Whitney), the precious and precocious drawings of William Cordova, and the eroticism of Fernando Palomar. Even 20-month old Clay (he's the Dan-let Steinhilber and Maggie-let Michael) seemed to enjoy Inter.play.

    * As I mentioned yesterday, artpoint holds up exceptionally well in comparison to the better-known work in the hall. From Gallery Four in Baltimore, Matthew Paulson's cut-up maps were intriguing. Check out LoDo from Phoenix, where Jon Haddock's acrylic drawings on panels mix pop culture references with surrealistic situations. Also notable: Harvey Ongenorth's photos from the Soap Factory, unsigned Miami artist Ivan Toth Depena's painterly iris prints (on watercolor paper!) and the dirty little hands of Michael Salter from Lump. Links to come on Monday night.

    * From the main hall... so much! But quickly... the paintings of Vernon Fisher student Xioze Xie were arresting, as were more drawings from William Cordova (represented by Ambrosino). Perhaps the most beautiful photography and video work in the main show is from Catherine Yass, whose lightboxes imply brushstrokes and whose video work is tense and sculptural. She shows at London's aspreyjacques.

    * Many of the most interesting booths were those of foreign galleries. Of note: Brazil's Galeria Fortes Villaca (especiallyt he work of Rosangela Renno), Sergio Belinchon's work from Spain's Galeria Luis Adelantado, the photography of Naoya Hatakyama @ Germany's LA Galerie, and the recent work by Ann Lislegaard from Spain's Galeria Elba Benitez.

    * Michael Kimmelman hits a home run today on GuggEnron. (I know, it's a cliche but I'm exhuasted!)

    * Links for everything on Monday. Or Google.


    Greetings from Miami!

    MAN has been having a total blast with the DC crew. Some highlights:

    * The semi-affiliated Inter.play exhibit in the Miami Design Center was much fun. The fair is pretty serious -- money, money, money. Inter.play succeeds at bringing much whimsy into the scene, especially in the video work of Luis Gispert (who was in the Whitney), the precious and precocious drawings of William Cordova, and the eroticism of Fernando Palomar. Even 20-month old Clay (he's the Dan-let Steinhilber and Maggie-let Michael) seemed to enjoy Inter.play.

    * As I mentioned yesterday, artpoint holds up exceptionally well in comparison to the better-known work in the hall. From Gallery Four in Baltimore, Matthew Paulson's cut-up maps were intriguing. Check out LoDo from Phoenix, where Jon Haddock's acrylic drawings on panels mix pop culture references with surrealistic situations. Also notable: Harvey Ongenorth's photos from the Soap Factory, unsigned Miami artist Ivan Toth Depena's painterly iris prints (on watercolor paper!) and the dirty little hands of Michael Salter from Lump. Links to come on Monday night.

    * From the main hall... so much! But quickly... the paintings of Vernon Fisher student Xioze Xie were arresting, as were more drawings from William Cordova (represented by Ambrosino). Perhaps the most beautiful photography and video work in the main show is from Catherine Yass, whose lightboxes imply brushstrokes and whose video work is tense and sculptural. She shows at London's aspreyjacques.

    * Many of the most interesting booths were those of foreign galleries. Of note: Brazil's Galeria Fortes Villaca (especiallyt he work of Rosangela Renno), Sergio Belinchon's work from Spain's Galeria Luis Adelantado, the photography of Naoya Hatakyama @ Germany's LA Galerie, and the recent work by Ann Lislegaard from Spain's Galeria Elba Benitez.

    * Michael Kimmelman hits a home run today on GuggEnron. (I know, it's a cliche but I'm exhuasted!)

    * Links for everything on Monday. Or Google.

    12.5.2002

    Greetings from Miami Beach!

    MAN's first news item of the week: DC's Jason Falchook is soon to be featured in a group show at DC's Corcoran. The other four artists will be Todd Hido, Susan Black, Sven Pahlsson and one other artist...

    * Artpoint, the exhibit feature Fusebox and Baltimore's Gallery Four is strong. Stronger than much of the oft-commercially oriented stuff in the main hall (too much Struth!). More tomorrow.


    Greetings from Miami Beach!

    MAN's first news item of the week: DC's Jason Falchook is soon to be featured in a group show at DC's Corcoran. The other four artists will be Todd Hido, Susan Black, Sven Pahlsson and one other artist...

    * Artpoint, the exhibit feature Fusebox and Baltimore's Gallery Four is strong. Stronger than much of the oft-commercially oriented stuff in the main hall (too much Struth!). More tomorrow.


    Greetings from Miami Beach!

    MAN's first news item of the week: DC's Jason Falchook is soon to be featured in a group show at DC's Corcoran. The other four artists will be Todd Hido, Susan Black, Sven Pahlsson and one other artist...

    * Artpoint, the exhibit feature Fusebox and Baltimore's Gallery Four is strong. Stronger than much of the oft-commercially oriented stuff in the main hall (too much Struth!). More tomorrow.


    Greetings from Miami Beach!

    MAN's first news item of the week: DC's Jason Falchook is soon to be featured in a group show at DC's Corcoran. The other four artists will be Todd Hido, Susan Black, Sven Pahlsson and one other artist...

    * Artpoint, the exhibit feature Fusebox and Baltimore's Gallery Four is strong. Stronger than much of the oft-commercially oriented stuff in the main hall (too much Struth!). More tomorrow.

    12.4.2002

    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN continues!

    Pre-opening parties got started last night. And the Miami Herald's critic gives us a walk through the main convention hall.

    MAN and several MANpals will brave the DC snowstorm to catch a dawn flight to Florida tomorrow!


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN continues!

    Pre-opening parties got started last night. And the Miami Herald's critic gives us a walk through the main convention hall.

    MAN and several MANpals will brave the DC snowstorm to catch a dawn flight to Florida tomorrow!


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN continues!

    Pre-opening parties got started last night. And the Miami Herald's critic gives us a walk through the main convention hall.

    MAN and several MANpals will brave the DC snowstorm to catch a dawn flight to Florida tomorrow!


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN continues!

    Pre-opening parties got started last night. And the Miami Herald's critic gives us a walk through the main convention hall.

    MAN and several MANpals will brave the DC snowstorm to catch a dawn flight to Florida tomorrow!


    ArtKrush continues with Day Three of its Laurel Nakadate diary. I think the project is a great idea and I wish I'd thought of it, but... here are a few highlights from Nakadate's lonely girl-on-the-road routine. From Day Two: "The number one question I'm asked about my work is: where do you find the men?" That's the top question?

    Nakadate seems to be aiming for being NYC's very own Tracey Emin. (From Day Three: Nakadate's press release "included a pair of little girls' underwear with my name silkscreened onto it.")


    ArtKrush continues with Day Three of its Laurel Nakadate diary. I think the project is a great idea and I wish I'd thought of it, but... here are a few highlights from Nakadate's lonely girl-on-the-road routine. From Day Two: "The number one question I'm asked about my work is: where do you find the men?" That's the top question?

    Nakadate seems to be aiming for being NYC's very own Tracey Emin. (From Day Three: Nakadate's press release "included a pair of little girls' underwear with my name silkscreened onto it.")


    ArtKrush continues with Day Three of its Laurel Nakadate diary. I think the project is a great idea and I wish I'd thought of it, but... here are a few highlights from Nakadate's lonely girl-on-the-road routine. From Day Two: "The number one question I'm asked about my work is: where do you find the men?" That's the top question?

    Nakadate seems to be aiming for being NYC's very own Tracey Emin. (From Day Three: Nakadate's press release "included a pair of little girls' underwear with my name silkscreened onto it.")


    ArtKrush continues with Day Three of its Laurel Nakadate diary. I think the project is a great idea and I wish I'd thought of it, but... here are a few highlights from Nakadate's lonely girl-on-the-road routine. From Day Two: "The number one question I'm asked about my work is: where do you find the men?" That's the top question?

    Nakadate seems to be aiming for being NYC's very own Tracey Emin. (From Day Three: Nakadate's press release "included a pair of little girls' underwear with my name silkscreened onto it.")


    LACMA, about $200M short, is delaying its rebuilding.


    LACMA, about $200M short, is delaying its rebuilding.


    LACMA, about $200M short, is delaying its rebuilding.


    LACMA, about $200M short, is delaying its rebuilding.

    12.3.2002

    Cool coincidence: ArtFORUM is having a discussion of the DC art scene on its message boards. (And if you think I'M venomous!)

    ASIDE: Excuse the odd posting today. Blogger's publishing was down all morning. I think everything is working now, but not totally sure.


    Cool coincidence: ArtFORUM is having a discussion of the DC art scene on its message boards. (And if you think I'M venomous!)

    ASIDE: Excuse the odd posting today. Blogger's publishing was down all morning. I think everything is working now, but not totally sure.


    Cool coincidence: ArtFORUM is having a discussion of the DC art scene on its message boards. (And if you think I'M venomous!)

    ASIDE: Excuse the odd posting today. Blogger's publishing was down all morning. I think everything is working now, but not totally sure.


    Cool coincidence: ArtFORUM is having a discussion of the DC art scene on its message boards. (And if you think I'M venomous!)

    ASIDE: Excuse the odd posting today. Blogger's publishing was down all morning. I think everything is working now, but not totally sure.


    2 Blowhards has a nice walk through "Modern Art 1851-1929" by Richard R. Brettell, which is part of the Oxford History of Art series.


    2 Blowhards has a nice walk through "Modern Art 1851-1929" by Richard R. Brettell, which is part of the Oxford History of Art series.


    2 Blowhards has a nice walk through "Modern Art 1851-1929" by Richard R. Brettell, which is part of the Oxford History of Art series.


    2 Blowhards has a nice walk through "Modern Art 1851-1929" by Richard R. Brettell, which is part of the Oxford History of Art series.


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN continues.

    The Miami Herald today gives us this gem of a story about Art Positions, an exhibit that will be on the beach and in shipping containers. Oddly, the writer insists on putting 'cutting edge' in quote marks because that's too weird a phrase to handle, or something.

    The precious line is from a gallery-owner who is clearly a little exasperated withthe writer: "'It's a [freaking] container,' observed Kavi Gupta, 33, director of the Vedanta Gallery of Chicago, which will show work by four of its artists in container number P-2. 'It's alternative by nature.'"


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN continues.

    The Miami Herald today gives us this gem of a story about Art Positions, an exhibit that will be on the beach and in shipping containers. Oddly, the writer insists on putting 'cutting edge' in quote marks because that's too weird a phrase to handle, or something.

    The precious line is from a gallery-owner who is clearly a little exasperated withthe writer: "'It's a [freaking] container,' observed Kavi Gupta, 33, director of the Vedanta Gallery of Chicago, which will show work by four of its artists in container number P-2. 'It's alternative by nature.'"


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN continues.

    The Miami Herald today gives us this gem of a story about Art Positions, an exhibit that will be on the beach and in shipping containers. Oddly, the writer insists on putting 'cutting edge' in quote marks because that's too weird a phrase to handle, or something.

    The precious line is from a gallery-owner who is clearly a little exasperated withthe writer: "'It's a [freaking] container,' observed Kavi Gupta, 33, director of the Vedanta Gallery of Chicago, which will show work by four of its artists in container number P-2. 'It's alternative by nature.'"


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN continues.

    The Miami Herald today gives us this gem of a story about Art Positions, an exhibit that will be on the beach and in shipping containers. Oddly, the writer insists on putting 'cutting edge' in quote marks because that's too weird a phrase to handle, or something.

    The precious line is from a gallery-owner who is clearly a little exasperated withthe writer: "'It's a [freaking] container,' observed Kavi Gupta, 33, director of the Vedanta Gallery of Chicago, which will show work by four of its artists in container number P-2. 'It's alternative by nature.'"

    12.2.2002

    MAN favorite ArtKrush is featuring a week-long diary by Laurel Nakadate, an artist whose first solo show opens this week @ Daniel Silverstein in NYC. The first installment is up now. I don't know if AK will archive each day's installment, so it's probably best to read daily.

    Nakadate's first entry reminds me of a play I saw this weekend @ Studio Theater here in DC. Both Nakadate's entry and The Shape of Things deal with relationships, sex and their relationship to art (this would make more sense if I spoiled the play for you, see below). The play is by Neil LaBute the director of Nurse Betty, Possession, and others. It's full of artist cliches and is an oft-cliched re-examination of "what is art," but it's interesting to have just seen it as Nakadate goes up on AK. (For a discussion of the play, with spoilers, click here and lots of reviews @ Google News.



    MAN favorite ArtKrush is featuring a week-long diary by Laurel Nakadate, an artist whose first solo show opens this week @ Daniel Silverstein in NYC. The first installment is up now. I don't know if AK will archive each day's installment, so it's probably best to read daily.

    Nakadate's first entry reminds me of a play I saw this weekend @ Studio Theater here in DC. Both Nakadate's entry and The Shape of Things deal with relationships, sex and their relationship to art (this would make more sense if I spoiled the play for you, see below). The play is by Neil LaBute the director of Nurse Betty, Possession, and others. It's full of artist cliches and is an oft-cliched re-examination of "what is art," but it's interesting to have just seen it as Nakadate goes up on AK. (For a discussion of the play, with spoilers, click here and lots of reviews @ Google News.



    MAN favorite ArtKrush is featuring a week-long diary by Laurel Nakadate, an artist whose first solo show opens this week @ Daniel Silverstein in NYC. The first installment is up now. I don't know if AK will archive each day's installment, so it's probably best to read daily.

    Nakadate's first entry reminds me of a play I saw this weekend @ Studio Theater here in DC. Both Nakadate's entry and The Shape of Things deal with relationships, sex and their relationship to art (this would make more sense if I spoiled the play for you, see below). The play is by Neil LaBute the director of Nurse Betty, Possession, and others. It's full of artist cliches and is an oft-cliched re-examination of "what is art," but it's interesting to have just seen it as Nakadate goes up on AK. (For a discussion of the play, with spoilers, click here and lots of reviews @ Google News.



    MAN favorite ArtKrush is featuring a week-long diary by Laurel Nakadate, an artist whose first solo show opens this week @ Daniel Silverstein in NYC. The first installment is up now. I don't know if AK will archive each day's installment, so it's probably best to read daily.

    Nakadate's first entry reminds me of a play I saw this weekend @ Studio Theater here in DC. Both Nakadate's entry and The Shape of Things deal with relationships, sex and their relationship to art (this would make more sense if I spoiled the play for you, see below). The play is by Neil LaBute the director of Nurse Betty, Possession, and others. It's full of artist cliches and is an oft-cliched re-examination of "what is art," but it's interesting to have just seen it as Nakadate goes up on AK. (For a discussion of the play, with spoilers, click here and lots of reviews @ Google News.



    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN continues.

    The Miami Herald has a bar/club-going column in which they mention some of the Art Basel-related events, including a David Byrne showcase at Mynt.


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN continues.

    The Miami Herald has a bar/club-going column in which they mention some of the Art Basel-related events, including a David Byrne showcase at Mynt.


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN continues.

    The Miami Herald has a bar/club-going column in which they mention some of the Art Basel-related events, including a David Byrne showcase at Mynt.


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN continues.

    The Miami Herald has a bar/club-going column in which they mention some of the Art Basel-related events, including a David Byrne showcase at Mynt.


    EDIT: MAN is getting lots of email about the Post letter. This is good. I'm happy to be disagreed with, thought I wish people would use the comment boards so that a wider dialog can happen (and that I can be flogged -- if you choose -- more publicly). However, I'd like to stress this: my letter addressed the visual arts component of AOM, and apparently that was clearer to me than it was to others. I am in no way qualified to engage in critical thought, etc. about music, film and such. I thought I was pretty clear on that in the first paragraph of the letter, but I guess not! Anyway, comment boards, please!

    (And I will do my best to reply to all the email I've received by tonight.)

    MAN is getting bombed with an abnormal number of hits for a Sunday (quintuple the norm). I can tell from my hit stats (search queries mostly through Google) that this is because of my letter in the Post. If you didn't contribute your two cents last week on the boards, use 'em here! Let 'er rip!


    EDIT: MAN is getting lots of email about the Post letter. This is good. I'm happy to be disagreed with, thought I wish people would use the comment boards so that a wider dialog can happen (and that I can be flogged -- if you choose -- more publicly). However, I'd like to stress this: my letter addressed the visual arts component of AOM, and apparently that was clearer to me than it was to others. I am in no way qualified to engage in critical thought, etc. about music, film and such. I thought I was pretty clear on that in the first paragraph of the letter, but I guess not! Anyway, comment boards, please!

    (And I will do my best to reply to all the email I've received by tonight.)

    MAN is getting bombed with an abnormal number of hits for a Sunday (quintuple the norm). I can tell from my hit stats (search queries mostly through Google) that this is because of my letter in the Post. If you didn't contribute your two cents last week on the boards, use 'em here! Let 'er rip!


    EDIT: MAN is getting lots of email about the Post letter. This is good. I'm happy to be disagreed with, thought I wish people would use the comment boards so that a wider dialog can happen (and that I can be flogged -- if you choose -- more publicly). However, I'd like to stress this: my letter addressed the visual arts component of AOM, and apparently that was clearer to me than it was to others. I am in no way qualified to engage in critical thought, etc. about music, film and such. I thought I was pretty clear on that in the first paragraph of the letter, but I guess not! Anyway, comment boards, please!

    (And I will do my best to reply to all the email I've received by tonight.)

    MAN is getting bombed with an abnormal number of hits for a Sunday (quintuple the norm). I can tell from my hit stats (search queries mostly through Google) that this is because of my letter in the Post. If you didn't contribute your two cents last week on the boards, use 'em here! Let 'er rip!


    EDIT: MAN is getting lots of email about the Post letter. This is good. I'm happy to be disagreed with, thought I wish people would use the comment boards so that a wider dialog can happen (and that I can be flogged -- if you choose -- more publicly). However, I'd like to stress this: my letter addressed the visual arts component of AOM, and apparently that was clearer to me than it was to others. I am in no way qualified to engage in critical thought, etc. about music, film and such. I thought I was pretty clear on that in the first paragraph of the letter, but I guess not! Anyway, comment boards, please!

    (And I will do my best to reply to all the email I've received by tonight.)

    MAN is getting bombed with an abnormal number of hits for a Sunday (quintuple the norm). I can tell from my hit stats (search queries mostly through Google) that this is because of my letter in the Post. If you didn't contribute your two cents last week on the boards, use 'em here! Let 'er rip!

    12.1.2002

    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN begins now!

    For the rest of the week, MAN will feature oodles of posts on Art Basel Miami Beach, which is also the best exhibit of DC contemporary art this season. As you likely know by now, MAN will head down to Florida (with a dozen of MAN's nearest and dearest pals) on Thursday and will return to DC on Monday morning.

    * The Miami Herald's Art Basel web central.

    * The Herald's site is useful for details, but is apparently tailored to ignoramuses. Witness this from their "tips" page: "Study modern and contemporary art for 30 minutes on the Internet. You'll at least be conversant with the names of the masters in the field and feel far more secure in asking questions of dealers."

    * Don't miss the artpoint exhibit, organized by Janet Phelps and curated by a number of bigwigs.

    * The Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach is home to the Elmer Bischoff retro that originated in Oakland last year. It's worth seeing.


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN begins now!

    For the rest of the week, MAN will feature oodles of posts on Art Basel Miami Beach, which is also the best exhibit of DC contemporary art this season. As you likely know by now, MAN will head down to Florida (with a dozen of MAN's nearest and dearest pals) on Thursday and will return to DC on Monday morning.

    * The Miami Herald's Art Basel web central.

    * The Herald's site is useful for details, but is apparently tailored to ignoramuses. Witness this from their "tips" page: "Study modern and contemporary art for 30 minutes on the Internet. You'll at least be conversant with the names of the masters in the field and feel far more secure in asking questions of dealers."

    * Don't miss the artpoint exhibit, organized by Janet Phelps and curated by a number of bigwigs.

    * The Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach is home to the Elmer Bischoff retro that originated in Oakland last year. It's worth seeing.


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN begins now!

    For the rest of the week, MAN will feature oodles of posts on Art Basel Miami Beach, which is also the best exhibit of DC contemporary art this season. As you likely know by now, MAN will head down to Florida (with a dozen of MAN's nearest and dearest pals) on Thursday and will return to DC on Monday morning.

    * The Miami Herald's Art Basel web central.

    * The Herald's site is useful for details, but is apparently tailored to ignoramuses. Witness this from their "tips" page: "Study modern and contemporary art for 30 minutes on the Internet. You'll at least be conversant with the names of the masters in the field and feel far more secure in asking questions of dealers."

    * Don't miss the artpoint exhibit, organized by Janet Phelps and curated by a number of bigwigs.

    * The Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach is home to the Elmer Bischoff retro that originated in Oakland last year. It's worth seeing.


    Art Basel Miami Beach week @ MAN begins now!

    For the rest of the week, MAN will feature oodles of posts on Art Basel Miami Beach, which is also the best exhibit of DC contemporary art this season. As you likely know by now, MAN will head down to Florida (with a dozen of MAN's nearest and dearest pals) on Thursday and will return to DC on Monday morning.

    * The Miami Herald's Art Basel web central.

    * The Herald's site is useful for details, but is apparently tailored to ignoramuses. Witness this from their "tips" page: "Study modern and contemporary art for 30 minutes on the Internet. You'll at least be conversant with the names of the masters in the field and feel far more secure in asking questions of dealers."

    * Don't miss the artpoint exhibit, organized by Janet Phelps and curated by a number of bigwigs.

    * The Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach is home to the Elmer Bischoff retro that originated in Oakland last year. It's worth seeing.


    WBUR's The Connection (an NPR show) did a show on Modigliani this week.


    WBUR's The Connection (an NPR show) did a show on Modigliani this week.


    WBUR's The Connection (an NPR show) did a show on Modigliani this week.


    WBUR's The Connection (an NPR show) did a show on Modigliani this week.
    posted by mclennan @ Sunday, December 15, 2002 | Permanent link

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