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This Is Only a Commercial

My patience level doesn’t often allow me to get terribly engaged in online video of much length. That said, this fun little production piece, designed to showcase a bit of video editing software, didn’t lose me for even a second. For those trying to enjoy the holiday weekend without an excess of online distraction, I still think it’s worth the time investment. And for those hiding from a family picnic in an upstairs bedroom, it’s entertaining enough to watch twice! Be sure not to miss the extra scene after the credits. Some moments of the plotline stereotyping work better than others, but the “hipster flirting” @ 5:30 is so pitch perfect it could carry the entire video if it had to. Gha! They even hit the soundtrack dead center.

[via]

Plus, it’s tightly edited, free to watch, and (if what I’ve been reading is true) better than what’s on screen at the cineplex right now. Why go see a summer blockbuster when you could make your own this holiday weekend?

Comments

  1. How *do* you manage to find this kinda stuff?

    Actually, I don’t really care. Just wanted to thank you for a nifty 10 minutes break.

    ACD

    • Well, my Google Reader overfloweth.

      But seriously, I don’t mean to be shifty about my sources! I put a [via] link in these when I find them thanks to someone else. Most of my re-posts are actually from pretty mainstream (for the internet) sources (Mashable, BoingBoing), but I just pick and choose the ones I a) think are awesome and b) think have a performing arts comment in them somewhere. Those sites are pretty high volume, and I appreciate that most readers may not want to wade through all that stuff for themselves.

  2. I notice in the demo that all of the stereo-typical plots seem oriented toward the entertainment of young males (except perhaps the brief flirt scene at 5:30 you mention.) So why do women go to the movies?

    • I’m not sure a love of popcorn, ridiculously cold AC, gun battles, and massive explosions is so gender specific. Then again, I’ve never really been an “Eat, Pray, Love” kinda girl.

      • It does look like girls enjoy all that shoot’em up stuff. Perhaps that explains the market for all those Angelina Jolie movies. I wonder what the gender demographic is for shooter video games. A 2007 study showed that male characters were significantly more likely to be portrayed as aggressive (83% versus 62% of female characters) while female characters were much more likely to be portrayed in a sexualized way (60% versus just 1% of male characters.) Does Laura Croft represent the future of women? The old T n’ A formula moved to T n’ A + guns.

        I also thought gamers were kids, but apparently that isn’t true. According to a recent survey by the Entertainment Software Association, the average gamer is 34 years old. The most frequent purchaser is 40. The ESA found that 40% of players are women (though it doesn’t say what kind of games they are playing.) There are a lot of very interesting stats about media consumption here:

        http://www.frankwbaker.com/mediause.htm

        It looks like orchestras could reach the elusive middle age demographic by programming video game music (assuming the purpose of high culture is to celebrate our idiocy.)

  3. Ryan Sheridan says:

    I wish I could buy a Plot Device button off Amazon :(

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